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NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE RECORD 



964-1966 
GRADUATE 
CATALOG 



Ph 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

of The University of North Carolina at Raleigh 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE RECORD 

Published monthly by North Carolina State of the University of North 
Carolina at Raleigh, Office of Information Services, Holladay Hall, excepting 
in September and December. Second Class postage paid at the post office 
at Raleigh, North Carolina. 

VOLUME 63 NUMBER 5 MARCH, 1964 



1964-1966 

GRADUATE 
CATALOG 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

of The University of North Carolina at Raleigh 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduatecatalog1964nort 



North Carolina State is a land-grant institution, founded 
in 1887 in the tradition of the great public state colleges 
and universities then being founded throughout the na- 
tion. These institutions were created under the federal 
Morrill Act of 1862 and were dedicated to expanding the 
opportunities for higher education. Once primarily "agri- 
cultural and mechanic arts" institutions, they now con- 
stitute the major public universities of the nation, teach- 
ing all areas of learning and conducting work in every area 
of the world. This is an aerial view of the central part of 
the North Carolina State campus. 







CONTENTS 

Officers of Administration 5 

Calendar 7 

North Carolina State Today 11 

North Carolina State Division of the Graduate 

School of the University of North Carolina 13 

Admission 18 

Graduate Degrees 20 

Tuition and Fees 35 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 38 

Residence Facilities 39 

Fields of Instruction 40 

Graduate Faculty 209 

Index 229 

Campus Map 231 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT RALEIGH 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Donald B. Anderson, B.A., B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President for Academic 

Affairs 
Arnold Kimsey King, Ph.D., Vice President for Institutional Studies 
Frederick Henry Weaver, A.B., A.M., Vice President for Administration 
Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard, Jr., A.B., M.A., Business Officer and Treasurer 
John T. Caldwell, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Chancellor 
William L. Turner, B.S., M.S., D.P.A., Business Manager 
Harlan C. Brown, B.A., B.S., A.M., Librarian 
J. J. Stewart, B.S., M.A., Dean of Student Affairs 

Kenneth D. Raab, B.A., M.A., Director of Admissions and Registration 
Joseph J. Combs, M.D., College Physician 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Donald B. Anderson, B.A., B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President 
Walter J. Peterson, B.S. M.S., Ph.D., Dean, North Carolina State 
Frank E. Guthrie, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Research 
Patsy J. Haywood, B.S., Assistant to the Dean 
Sally Cloninger, Secretan 
Sybil B. Webb, Secretary 
Frances M. Emory, Secretary 

THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

The Executive Council is made up of members of the Advisory Boards of 
each of the three units of the Consolidated University. The President, the 
Vice President, the Chancellors and the Graduate Deans are ex-officio mem- 
bers of the Executive Council. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD AT 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT RALEIGH 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean 

Richard Loree Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Statistics and 

Graduate Administrator— Term expires October, 1964. 
David M. Cates, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry and Assistant 

Director, Chemical Research— Term expires July, 1964. 
George O. Doak, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry— Term expires September, 

1967. 
Arthur Kelman, Ph.D., William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Plant Pathology— Term expires November, 1966. 
Roy Lee Lovvorn, Ph.D., Professor of Field Crops and Director of Research 
in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences— Term expires March, 
1965. 



6 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Patrick H. McDonald, Ph.D., Professor of Engineering Mechanics and Head 
of Department— Term expires December, 1964. 

Howard G. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Head of Department- 
Term expires November, 1967. 

T. Ewald Maki, Ph.D., Head of Department of Forest Management— Term 
expires August, 1964. 

George W. Poland, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages and Head of 
Department— Term expires January, 1968. 

William D. Stevenson, Jr., M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering and 
Graduate Administrator— Term expires October, 1965. 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD AT 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 

C. Hugh Holman, Ph.D., Dean 

Charles Emert Bowerman, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology and Research Pro- 
fessor in the Institute for Research in Social Science 

Glen Haydon, Ph.D., Kenan Professor of Music 

Alan Keith-Lucas, Ph.D., Alumni Distinguished Professor of Social Work 

Arnold Kimsey King, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Director of the 
Summer Session 

Frank Wysor Klingberg, Ph.D., Professor of History 

George Sherman Lane, Ph.D., Kenan Professor of German 

John Edgar Larsh, M.C., Sc.D., Professor of Parasitology in the School of 
Public Health 

Harvey Eugene Lehman, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 

George Philip Manire, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

George Edward Nicholson, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Statistics and Research 
Professor in the Institute for Research in Social Science 

Ralph William Pfouts, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Research Affiliate 
in the Institute for Research in Social Science 

Ernest William Talbert, Ph.D., Professor of English 

THE ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD AT 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT GREENSBORO 

James S. Ferguson, Ph.D., Dean (ex officio) 

Richard Bardolph, Ph.D., Professor of History 

Joseph A. Bryant, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of English 

Elizabeth Duffy, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

Bruce Eberhart, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

Vance T. Littlejohn, Ph.D., Professor of Business Education 

Ethel L. Martus, M.S., Professor of Physical Education 

Mereb E. Mossman, M.A., L.H.D., Dean of the College and Professor of 

Sociology (ex officio) 
Lee Rigsby, Ph.D., Professor of Music 
Donald W. Russell, Ed.D., Professor of Education 
Irwin V. Sperry, Ed.D., Professor of Home Economics 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



SUMMER SESSIONS 



1964 




First Session 




June 9 

June 10 
June 15 


Tues. 
(9:00 a.m. 
1:00 p.m.) 
Wed. 
Mon. 


June 16 


Tues. 


June 18 


Thurs. 


June 19 
June 30 


Fri. 
Tues. 


July 2 


Thurs. 


July 15 
July 16 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


Second Session 




July 21 

July 22 
July 27 


Tues. 
(9:00 a.m.- 
12:00 noon) 

Wed. 

Mon. 



July 30 



Thurs. 



July 31 
August 13 


Fri. 
Thurs. 


August 26 
August 27 


Wed. 
Thurs 


FALL SEMESTER 


1964 




September 8 
September 9 


Tues. 
Wed. 


September 14 
September 16 


Mon. 
Wed. 


September 18 


Fri. 


September 25 
September 30 


Fri. 
Wed. 


November 2 


Mon. 


November 7 


Sat. 


November 24 


Tues. 


November 30 


Mon. 



THE CALENDAR 



Registration and fee payment. Late registration fee of 
$5 payable by all registering after 1:00 p.m. June 9. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 
refund less $7 registration fee and last day to drop any 
course with refund. 

Last day for filing application for admission to candi- 
dacy for students expecting to complete requirements 
for the master's degree in August. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in July. 
Last day to drop courses without grades. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in January, 1965. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration and fee payment. Late registration fee of 
$5 payable by all registering after 12:00 noon July 21. 

First day of classes. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 

refund less $7 registration fee and last day to drop any 

course with refund. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 

Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 

doctoral degrees in August. 

Last day to drop courses without grades. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 

degrees not requiring theses. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



General faculty meeting. 

Registration day for all new students and other stu- 
dents not preregistered. Late registration fee of $5 
payable by all who register after Sept. 9. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register. Last day for filing application for 
admission to candidacy for students expecting to com- 
plete requirements for the master's degree in January, 
1965. 

Last day to withdraw with refund less $7 registration 
fee. Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop courses without grades. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in May, 1965. 
Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of the 
University of North Carolina. 
Mid-term reports due. 
Thanksgiving holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



December 16 Wed. 



December 17 Thurs. 
January 4, 1965 Mon. 
January 8 Fri. 

January 13 Wed. 

Januarv 14 Thurs. 

January 15-22 Fri.-Fri. 

January 18 Mon. 

SPRING SEMESTER 
1965 

January 27 Wed. 



February 1 
February 3 


Mon. 
Wed. 


February 5 


Fri. 


February 12 
February 17 


Fri. 
Wed. 


March 20 


Sat. 


April 5 


Mon. 


April 14 
April 20 


Wed. 
Tues. 


April 30 


Fri. 



May 14 



Fri. 



May 19 
May 20 

May 21-28 


Wed. 

Thurs. 

Fri.-Fri. 


May 29 


Sat. 


SUMMER SESSIONS 


1965 




First Session 




June 14 


Mon. 




(9:00 a.m.- 




1:00 p.m.) 


June 15 


Tues. 


June 18 


Fri. 


June 21 


Mon. 


June 23 


Wed. 


July 5 


Mon. 


July 7 


Wed. 


July 20 
July 21 


Tues. 
Wed. 



Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 

Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 

doctoral degrees in January, 1965. 

Christmas holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 

degrees not requiring theses. 

Last day of classes. 

Reading day. 

Final examinatijns. 

Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of the 

University of North Carolina. 



Registration day. All new students and all other stu- 
dents not preregistered. Late registration fee of $5 
payable by all who register after Jan. 27. 
Classes begin. 

Last day to register. Last day for filing application for 
admission to candidacy for students expecting to com- 
plete requirements for the master's degree in May and 
July. 

Last day to withdraw with refund less $7 registration 
fee. Last day to add a course. 
Last day to drop courses without grades. 
Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in August, 1965. 
Mid-term reports due. 

Aleeting of Graduate Executive Council of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
Easter holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in May. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



Registration and payment of fees. Late registration fee 
of $5 payable by all who register after 1:00 p.m. June 
14. 

Classes begin. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 
refund less $7 registration fee and last day to drop 
courses without grades. 

Last day for filing application for admission to candi- 
dacy for students expecting to complete requirements 
for the master's degree in August. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in July. 

Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in January, 1965. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Second Session 

July 22 



July 23 
July 29 



Thurs. Registration and payment of fees. Late registration of 

(9:00 a.m.- $5 payable by all who register after 12:00 noon July 22. 
12:00 noon) 



July 30 



August 13 



Fri. 
Thurs. 



Fri. 



Fri. 



August 26 
August 27 


Thurs. 
Fri. 


FALL SEMESTER 


1965 




September 7 
September 8 


Tues. 
Wed. 


September 13 
September 15 


Mon. 
Wed. 



September 17 Fri. 
September 29 Wed. 



October 8 


Fri. 


November 1 


Mon. 


November 6 


Sat. 


November 15- 




December 1 


Mon.- 




Wed. 


November 23 


Tues. 


November 29 


Mon. 


December 17 


Fri. 



December 18 Sat. 
January 3, 1966 Mon. 
January 7 Fri. 

January 12 Wed. 

January 13 Thurs. 

January 14-21 Mon.-Fri. 

January 17 Mon. 

SPRING SEMESTER 
1966 

January 26 Wed. 



January 31 Mon. 



Classes begin. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 

refund less $7 registration fee and last day to drop 

courses without grades. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 

Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 

doctoral degrees in August. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 

degrees not requiring theses. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



General faculty meeting. 

Registration for all students who did not preregister 
and for all preregistered students changing courses. 
Late registration fee of $5 payable by all who register 
after September 8. 
Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day to register. Last day for filing application for 
admission to candidacy for students expecting to com- 
plete requirements for the master's degree in January, 
1966. 

Last day to withdraw with refund less $7 registration 
fee. Last day to add a course. 

Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in May, 1966. 
Last day to drop courses without grades. 
Meeting of Graduate Executive Council of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
Mid- term reports due. 

Preregistration. All students continuing in the spring 
semester must see advisors. 
Thanksgiving holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's end 
doctoral degrees in January, 1966. 
Christmas holidays begin at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Final examinations. 

Meeting of the Graduate Executive Council of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 



Registration for all students who did not preregister 
and for all preregistered students changing courses. 
Late registration fee of $5 payable by all who register 
after January 26. 
Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 



10 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



February 2 


Wed. 


February 4 


Fri. 


February 16 


Wed. 


February 25 
March 19 


Fri. 
Sat. 


March 28- 


Mon.- 


April 15 
April 4 


Mon. 


April 6 
April 12 
April 29 


Wed. 
Tues. 
Fri. 



Fri. 



May 13 



Fri. 



May 18 
May 19 
May 20-27 
May 28 


Wed. 
Thurs. 
Fri.-Fri. 
Sat. 


SUMMER SESSIONS 


1966 




June 7 


Tues. 




(9:00 a.m.- 




1:00 p.m.) 


June 8 


Wed. 


June 13 


Mon. 



June 14 

June 17 

June 28 

July 1 

July 4 
July 14 
July 15 

Second Session 

July 19 



Tues. 



Fri. 



Tues. 

Fri. 

Mon. 

Thurs. 

Fri. 



Last day to register. Last day for filing application for 
admission to candidacy for students expecting to com- 
plete requirements for the master's degree in May and 
July. 

Last day to withdraw with refund less $7 registration 
fee. Last day to add a course. 

Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in August, 1966. 
Last day to drop courses without grades. 
Mid-term reports due. 

Preregistration. All students continuing in the fall 
must see advisors. 

Meeting of Graduate Executive Council of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 
Easter holidays begin at 6:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in May. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations by candi- 
dates for master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Reading day. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



Registration and payment of fees. Late registration 
fee of $5 payable by all who register after 1:00 p.m., 
June 7. 

Classes begin. 

Last day for registration. Last day to withdraw with 
refund less $7 registration fee and last day to drop 
courses without grades. 

Last day for filing application for admission to candi- 
dacy for students expecting to complete requirements 
for the master's degree in August. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in July. 

Last day for taking qualifying examinations for stu- 
dents expecting to receive doctorate in January, 1966. 
Last day for taking final oral examinations by candi- 
dates for master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



July 20 
July 25 



July 28 



August 11 

August 24 
August 25 



Tues. 
(9:00 a.m.- 
12:00 noon) July 19. 
Wed. 
Mon. 



Registration and payment of fees. Late registration fee 
of $5 payable by all who register after 12:00 noon 



Thurs. 



Thurs. 

Wed. 
Thurs. 



Classes begin. 

Last day to register. Last day to withdraw with refund 
less $7 registration fee and last day to withdraw with- 
out grades. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final form to 
Graduate School by candidates for the master's and 
doctoral degrees in August. 

Last day for taking final oral examinations by candi- 
dates for master's degrees not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE TODAY 



North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at Raleigh 
entered the field of higher education in America in the late 1800's, the 
product of public demand for expansion of opportunity in higher education 
and for college curricula of modern character— chiefly in "the agricultural 
sciences and the mechanic arts." 

As North Carolina's land-grant university, "State" was founded under 
terms of the Federal Morrill Act of 1862, which provided for the establish- 
ment of at least one public college of this type in each state and territory. 
These institutions, sharing a common educational philosophy and nature, 
became known as "land-grant colleges" since public lands were used for 
their founding. 

North Carolina State opened in 1889 with 45 students. Enrollment now 
totals slightly more than 8,000, with over 1,200 students engaged in graduate 
study. 

"State's" name has been changed three times in its history, in each instance 
the result of the expansion of the college's programs or in connection with 
major legislation providing for the orderly development of higher education 
in North Carolina. The most recent change came in 1963 when North Caro- 
lina reaffirmed its intent to maintain the concept of one Consolidated State 
University composed of several campuses, and with exclusive jurisdiction to 
grant Ph.D. degrees and having primary responsibility for research. 

"State," as with its sister land-grant institutions, began as a state college 
of agriculture and mechanic arts and bore that name. It became North 
Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering in 1917. In 1931 
"of the University of North Carolina" was added when the concept of the 
Consolidated University was formalized by law. 

In the three-quarters of a century since its founding, the research, ex- 
tension and academic programs at the institution have grown to embrace 
the work of more than 1,000 professional staff members, 16 branch agricul- 
tural experiment stations, eight undergraduate schools, agents in each of the 
state's 100 counties, and a $10 million annual research expenditure. 

The main campus of 2,500 acres is valued at more than $50 million, and 
includes 75 major classroom, laboratory, and auxiliary facilities buildings. 

As the programs for research and study have grown and become more 
complex, special institutes and curricula have been established. Prominent at 
NCS are the Institutes of Statistics, Biological Sciences, Water Resources, 
and Agricultural Policy and the Sensory Physiology Laboratory. 

An interesting feature of the graduate program at State is the large 
number of international students. There are more than 350 foreign students 
—both graduate and undergraduate— studying at NCS. An International Stu- 
dent Center provides opportunity for students to become acquainted with 
future leaders of many countries. 




Holladay Hall, the main administrative office building, is the oldest building on campus. Erected In 
1889, two years after State was founded, the building is named in honor of Alexander Q. Holladay, first 
president of the college. 



There are eight undergraduate schools at "State": Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, Design, Education, Engineering, Forestry, Liberal Arts, Physical 
Sciences and Applied Mathematics, and Textiles. 

With its many concerts, lectures, and arts programs, its cosmopolitan 
character, and its broad research and educational commitments, North Caro- 
lina State provides an ideal academic and cultural climate for graduate study. 

Cast in the mold of the modern, complex state university, North Carolina 
State also has responsibilities of international dimension. In addition to an 
extensive technical assistance program in Peru, "State" faculty conduct spe- 
cialized projects throughout the world and host a continuing procession of 
international visitors. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 13 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE DIVISION 



Donald B. Anderson, Vice President, Academic Affairs, Chapel Hill 
Walter John Peterson, Dean, Raleigh 

The Graduate School of the Consolidated University of North Carolina is 
composed of three divisions, one at- each of the three units of the University 
System. Each branch of the Consolidated Graduate School is administered by 
a graduate dean who works in close association with the Vice President in 
Charge of Academic Affairs. The Graduate Council is composed of rep- 
resentatives of the Administrative Boards of each of the three units of 
the Consolidated University. At North Carolina State the graduate dean is 
assisted in all matters of policy by an Administrative Board of ten members. 
Seven are elected by the faculties of the degree-granting schools and three are 
appointed by the Chancellor after consultation with the Dean. 

Graduate instruction at North Carolina State is organized to provide oppor- 
tunity and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of agricul- 
ture and life sciences, engineering, forestry, physical sciences and applied 
mathematics, technological education, and textiles. The purpose of these 
graduate programs is to develop in advanced students a more adequate 
comprehension of the scope of knowledge in these special fields of learning 
and an understanding of the requirements and responsibilities essential for 
independent research investigations. In all of the graduate programs emphasis 
is placed upon a high level of scholarship rather than upon the satisfaction 
of specific course or credit requirements. 

The full resources of the Consolidated University of North Carolina are 
available to all graduate students enrolled at any of the three divisions of 
the Graduate School. Exceptional facilities for graduate study are provided 
at North Carolina State. New buildings furnish modern well equipped labora- 
tories for graduate study in specialized areas of agriculture and life sciences, 
engineering, forestry, physical sciences and applied mathematics, and textiles. 

The North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the Department 
of Engineering Research are integral parts of the University at Raleigh. The 
staff, research facilities, equipment, and field studies of these organizations 
contribute in a very important way to the graduate programs. The Institute 
of Statistics at North Carolina State makes available to graduate students 
unusual opportunities in this important phase of research study. 

The State of North Carolina, extending from the Atlantic Ocean westward 
about 500 miles to the Appalachian Mountains, possesses an exceptional 
range of climatic and topographic environments. The Coastal Plain, the 
Piedmont, and the mountains provide a rich pattern of agricultural and 
industrial activities which offer unusual opportunities for research study and 
employment. 



14 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

North Carolina State is located in Raleigh, situated on the boundary 
separating the broad coastal plains on the East from the rolling terrain of 
the Piedmont on the West, about midway between the northern and southern 
boundaries of the State. Raleigh is 29 miles from the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, and 26 miles from Durham, the home of Duke 
University. The libraries and other facilities of the three institutions make 
this area one of the important centers of research opportunity in the South. 

The D. H. Hill Library 

The D. H. Hill Library of North Carolina State has excellent holdings in 
materials essential for research study in the graduate curricula offered by the 
University. 

As of July 1, 1963, the Library held about 270,000 volumes of books and 
bound journals, including more than 12,000 bound volumes of documents. 
The books and journals reflect strongly the scientific and technological 
interests of the University, and the documents represent a most important 
increment of the whole collection. They include publications of the Federal 
Government, all publications of the various Agricultural Experiment Stations, 
most of the publications of the Engineering Experiment and Engineering 
Research Stations, and publications of the various research stations all over 
the world. 

The D. H. Hill Library holdings and other library holdings within a 30 
mile radius of North Carolina State constitute the greatest concentration of 
library resources south of Washington, D. C. These include the D. H. Hill 
Library, the Chemstrand Research Center Library, the Duke University 
Library, and the Louis Round Wilson Library at the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

An inter-library delivery service exchanges volumes among the three Uni- 
versity libraries three days a week. These three libraries have a total of more 
than 3,000,000 volumes. This loan service serves faculty and graduate students 
on the three campuses. Identification certificates enabling participation in the 
reciprocal arrangement may be secured at the D. H. Hill Library. 

The D. H. Hill Library is preparing a list of scientific periodicals which 
will list holdings of Duke University and the units of the Consolidated 
University. This will be available to faculty members and research scientists 
in the area and to other libraries throughout the Nation. 

The North Carolina State Library is a depository for all unclassified 
publications of the Federal Government that are available for distribution. 
They include publications of the United States Department of Agriculture, 
Geological Survey, National Bureau of Standards, Department of Interior 
and others. Since the Library was designated as a depository in 1923, its docu- 
ment holdings in the University's special interest fields are almost 100 per 
cent complete. 

The Library is a depository for the publications of the Carnegie Institu- 
tion of Washington and has excellent files of these valuable monographs. 

Also, the Library is a depository for all unclassified and declassified publi- 
cations of the Atomic Energy Commission. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 15 

Publications of many foreign countries— especially publications dealing 
with the agricultural sciences and with engineering— are received on ex- 
change by the Library. 

In July, 1960, the Library became a depository for the publications of the 
Food and Agriculture Administration of the United Nations. 

The Library, in July, 1959, acquired the Tippmann Collection of Ento- 
mology, the outstanding private collection of Dr. Friedrich F. Tippmann of 
Vienna. The collection contains 6,200 books and bound research journals 
in the field of entomology, many of them rare and unobtainable. 

A recent donation of $5,000 from the Alumni Association was used to 
purchase two outstanding sets of the rare 20-volume "Edizone Nazionale" of 
the works of Galileo and an almost complete file of the important German 
botanical periodical, "Bibliotheca Botanica," covering the years 1889 to 
1960. 

Funds ($3,501) from the estate of the late Chancellor J. W. Harrelson 
were allocated to purchase 118 rare volumes in mathematics and history of 
science. 

The research holdings of the Library are particularly strong in the fields 
of entomology, nuclear energy, genetics, aeronautics and space technology, 
engineering and physics, and include files of the major journals in these 
fields. A large and useful collection of books in the humanities and the social 
sciences is available for the use of undergraduate students. 

The Library's photocopy service is of great importance to faculty and 
graduate students in that it provides facilities for copying materials not per- 
mitted to leave the library. 

The Textile Library, an on-campus branch of the main library, contains 
outstanding holdings in textiles and textile chemistry. It is regarded as one of 
the best textile libraries in the country. The School of Design Library has a 
very fine collection of books, journals and slides in the fields of architecture, 
landscape architecture and product design. 

Institute of Statistics 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and 
the other at Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State, the Institute provides 
statistical consulting services to all branches of the Institution, sponsors re- 
search in statistical theory and methodology, and coordinates the teaching 
of statistics at the undergraduate and graduate level. The actual instructional 
and other academic functions are performed by the Department of Experi- 
mental Statistics, which forms a part of the Institute. 

The purpose of the Institute is to provide extra depth and strength in the 
development and use of modern statistical procedures throughout the Institu- 
tion. This involves cooperative efforts with many schools, departments, and 
agencies. The establishment of a nationally recognized program in quantita- 
tive genetics and recent developments in the field of biomathematics illu- 
strates the coordinating role the Institute plays in the quantitative sciences. 

In addition to these local activities, the Institute maintains close and 
continuing contact with statistics scholars, research programs, and graduate 



16 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

instruction programs throughout the world. It has helped develop an inter- 
national abstracting journal for statistical articles. The Institute is the point 
of contact for grants and contracts in statistics. It has been active in organiz- 
ing and maintaining a strong Southern Regional Cooperative Graduate 
Summer Session in statistics. Approximately 15 graduate assistantships in 
statistics are made available annually through the efforts of the Institute. All 
of these contributions have added substantially to the vigor of the entire 
graduate program of North Carolina State. 

Computing Facilities 

The IBM 1410 Tape System in the Computing Center is available for 
graduate instruction and research. The Computing Center each year offers 
several non-credit short courses in FORTRAN programming to facilitate the 
use of this computer in graduate research. 

One IBM 1620 Computer, used jointly by the Department of Agricultural 
Economics and the Biomathematics program, is available for use by graduate 
students in these areas. A second IBM 1620 is available for graduate students 
in the School of Textiles. 

A LINC III Computer is available for research in the Biomathematics 
program. 

Nuclear Reactor Project 

The Nuclear Reactor Project at North Carolina State descends from the 
first privately-owned research reactor facility in the United States, installed 
at North Carolina State in 1952. 

A 100-kilowatt tank-type heterogeneous reactor and supporting equipment 
are available for graduate research and laboratory study. Facilities are also 
available for studies in radiochemistry, nuclear physics, nuclear electronics, 
health physics, and neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy. 

Student, faculty, and contract research activities are concurrent with the 
instructional programs. This produces an atmosphere that is stimulating to 
the student and aids in keeping course material abreast of recent develop- 
ments in the nuclear energy field. 

Research Program at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies 

North Carolina State is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak Ridge 
Institute of Nuclear Studies at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this coopera- 
tive association, North Carolina State's graduate research program has at its 
disposal the facilities and research staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 
Extensive research programs are underway there on physical and biological 
effects of radiation, radioisotope utilization, and many other areas of nuclear 
science and engineering. When master's and doctoral candidates have com- 
pleted their resident work, it may be possible, by special arrangement, for 
them to do their thesis research at Oak Ridge. In addition, it is possible for 
the staff members of this University to go to Oak Ridge for advanced study 
in their particular fields. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



17 



Institute of Biological Sciences 

The Institute of Biological Sciences is an organization within the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences of the Departments of Botany and Bacteriology, 
Entomology, Genetics, Plant Pathology, Zoology and faculties of Microbiology 
and Biochemistry. Its function is to encourage and promote research and 
teaching in basic biology and to coordinate inter-departmental activities. 
Program-type grants are administered by the Institute and enable grant sup- 
port to be provided to discipline and subject matter areas involving faculties 
in several departments. Personnel from six departments and three schools are 
involved in research and graduate training. 

Facility planning, development and support for biological sciences is an 
important function of the Institute. Also, Summer Institutes are administered 
in the Institute of Biological Sciences. These have included the National 
Science Foundation sponsored Summer Institutes in Genetics for College 
Teachers, Biology for High School Teachers and Biology, Chemistry, and 
Mathematics for High School Students. 

Undergraduate Research Participation for Biological Sciences is a coopera- 
tive program administered in the Institute. This program has had an out- 
standing record in the percentage of individuals going into graduate study 
following their participation in this program. 

This organization provides a mechanism for strengthening research and 
instruction in existing graduate programs and for developing new inter- 
disciplinary areas. Inter-departmental cooperative graduate programs have 
become increasingly important within the basic biological sciences and be- 
tween the biological, physical and engineering sciences. The Institute plays 
an important role in encouraging the full utilization of the faculties and 
facilities for graduate research and instruction. 

Harrelson Hall's unusual architecture makes it a campus landmark as well as a most functional class- 
room building. Home of the newly created School of Liberal Arts, the building contains 112 offices and 
77 classrooms, making it the largest classroom facility on campus. 




18 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ADMISSION 



Graduate School admission may be to full graduate standing, provisional or 
unclassified status. Applications for admission to the Graduate School must 
be accompanied by official transcripts from all colleges previously attended. 

Full Graduate Standing— For admission in this category a student must 
have a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university regarded as 
standard by a regional or general accrediting agency and must have at least 
a B grade average in his undergraduate major. 

Provisional admission may be granted to applicants who lack under- 
graduate work considered essential for graduate study in the major field. 
Course work, without graduate credit, will be required to make up such 
deficiencies before admission to full graduate status can be granted. 

Graduates from non-accredited institutions may be granted provisional 
admission when their academic records warrant this status. Additional course 
work will be required of such students when deficiencies in their previous 
training are apparent. 

Graduates from accredited institutions whose scholastic records are below 
the standards for admission to full graduate standing may be admitted pro- 
visionally when unavoidable extenuating circumstances affected their under- 
graduate averages or when progressive improvements in their undergraduate 
programs warrant provisional admission. All such students are required to 
take the Graduate Record Examination and to submit scores to the Graduate 
Office in support of their application. The National Teacher Examination 
may be substituted for the Graduate Record Examination if recommended 
by the department head. Information as to the dates on which the Graduate 
Record and the National Teacher Examinations are given may be obtained 
at the Graduate Office. 

Graduate students admitted on a provisional status may attain full graduate 
standing when the deficiencies responsible for their provisional status are 
corrected. They also must have maintained a satisfactory academic record in 
all course work taken as part of their graduate program. Change from pro- 
visional to full graduate standing is effected only on written recommendation 
from the department in which the student is seeking his degree. 

Unclassified graduate students are not candidates for graduate degrees. 
They may take courses for graduate credit, but may not apply more than 
ten credits earned while in the unclassified status to any program leading to 
an advanced degree at this institution. Unclassified graduate students are 
expected to meet the same admission requirements that apply to graduate 
students in full standing. 

Applications for admission to the Graduate School should be on file in 
the Graduate Office at least thirty days in advance of the registration date 
for the term in which the student wishes to enroll in the Graduate School. 

Public school personnel (primary teachers, secondary teachers, or admini- 
strators) registering at North Carolina State for the first time who are in- 
terested primarily in "Certification Credit" may enroll as graduate students 
for a maximum of six semester hours without forwarding official transcripts 
of previous work to the Graduate Office. If, however, application is not made 
through normal channels for graduate credit in the session in which the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 19 

course or courses are taken, the student will not be permitted to apply the 
credit toward an advanced degree at North Carolina State, or elsewhere. 

In all cases where the teacher's interest is primarily in approval for certifi- 
cation credit, the School of Education will be responsible for assessing the 
adequacy of the teacher's qualifications for enrollment in the University in 
the particular course or courses. The School of Education will also be responsi- 
ble for advising all such students early in each school session that if they 
wish their cre.dits to be applied in due course to a higher degree at North 
Carolina State, or elsewhere, normal admission procedures will be required. 

All teachers who have previously attended North Carolina State and earned 
six semester hours of credit and wish to enroll for additional courses for 
graduate credit will be required to make application for admission to the 
Graduate School in the usual manner, if they have not already done so. 

In all cases a "B" level of academic performance or better is required. 

Graduate-Special-This classification is used primarily for students en- 
rolling in special institutes such as the summer institutes regularly held for 
college teachers, high school teachers, and graduate students, or special grad- 
uate training programs for separate groups such as our summer offerings for 
extension staff. 

The following rules apply to students registered as Graduate-Special: 

1. All must have at least a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institu- 
tion of higher learning. 

2. Official transcripts need not be submitted to the Graduate Office for 
enrollment in this classification but the appropriate Institute or Program 
Director must file with the Graduate Dean well in advance the nature 
of the program, the criteria and methods used in selection of the stu- 
dents, and assurances that the students have adequate preparation for 
the courses contemplated. 

3. Placement in this classification carries with it no implication that stu- 
dents will be admitted to the Graduate School in any of the other classi- 
fications. 

4. Graduate credit will be allowed for not to exceed six hours of course 
work at the 500 or 600 level if performance is at a "B" level or better. 

5. If the student is in due course admitted to the Graduate School, grad- 
uate credit obtained under this classification may apply to an advanced 
degree, if in the judgment of the Advisory Committee the course (s) are 
germane to the particular program of work. 

6. Students who have received as much as six hours of graduate credit 
under this classification must make application for admission to the 
Graduate School before permission will be granted to enroll for addi- 
tional graduate work. 

Registration-The Office of Registration must have written authorization 
from the Dean of the Graduate School before any graduate student will be 
given a permit to register. This authorization will be sent to the Office of 
Registration by the graduate dean at the time the student is notified of his 
acceptance. 

Physical Examinations-All regularly enrolled graduate students must take 
a physical examination preferably given by the family physician and the 



20 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

results recorded on forms provided by the University. When this is not done 
the examination may be given by the N. C. State physician during registra- 
tion for a fee of $5.00. 

Course Load— A full-time graduate load is considered to be nine to fifteen 
credits per semester. This course load restriction is made so that graduate 
students may have time for reading and contemplation well beyond the limits 
set for satisfactory undergraduate work. In exceptional cases one or two 
additional credit hours may be added to the roster if necessary in order to 
get prerequisite work which is not taught in subsequent terms, provided the 
corresponding adjustment in course load is made in the other terms. Rosters 
with additional credit hours beyond fifteen should be accompanied by a 
special note from the head of the major department indicating the reasons 
for the additional work. 

Full-time employees may register for credit or audit one course in each 
semester upon the recommendation of their department head and approval 
of their dean and the business manager. 

Employees having academic rank higher than that of instructor may 
register for graduate work for credit to be transferred to other institutions. 
They may not undertake programs for graduate degrees in the Consolidated 
University of North Carolina. 

Graduate assistants on half-time appointments are permitted a maxi- 
mum course load of nine credits per semester unless corresponding adjust- 
ments are made in their service obligations during the same semester. If the 
appointment is for the academic year of nine months, half-time assistants are 
restricted to a maximum of eighteen credit hours of work during the nine 
months of their appointment. Half-time graduate assistants whose appoint- 
ments are for twelve months may not exceed a total of twenty-four credits 
during the twelve month period of their appointment. Three-quarter time 
graduate assistants whose appointments are for twelve months may register 
for a total of sixteen credits during the calendar year. A total of six credits 
is the maximum load in a regular semester. 

A member of the North Carolina State senior class may, upon approval 
of the Dean of the Graduate School, register for courses in the 500 group for 
graduate credit to fill a roster of studies not to exceed fifteen credits in any 
semester. Not more than six hours of graduate credit may be acquired by an 
undergraduate student. Courses listed with numbers in the 600 series are not 
ordinarily open to undergraduates. Occasional exceptions may be made for 
"honor" students. 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

Admission to the Graduate School does not constitute admission to candi- 
dacy for a graduate degree. Application for admission to candidacy for grad- 
uate degrees must be submitted to the Administrative Board of the Graduate 
School. Applications of students preparing for the master's degree may not 
be filed before the satisfactory completion of one full semester of graduate 
study and must be presented before the end of the first week of the last 
semester in residence. Approval of the application will be determined by the 
quality of the scholastic record and on the certification by the major depart- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 21 

ment that the student is qualified to continue advanced work. Admission to 
candidacy for the doctorate is granted upon satisfactory completion of the 
qualifying or preliminary examinations. 

The Graduate School at North Carolina State offers work leading to the 
Master of Science degree and the Professional Master's degree in certain 
specialized fields in the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education, 
Engineering, Forestry, Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics, and Tex- 
tiles; and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in certain fields of agriculture and 
life sciences, engineering, forestry, and physical sciences and applied mathe- 
matics. 

A graduate student is expected to familiarize himself with the requirements 
for the degree for which he is a candidate and is held responsible for the 
fulfillment of these requirements. This applies to the last dates on which 
theses may be accepted, the dates for examinations, the proper form of theses, 
and all other matters regarding requirements for degrees. 

Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science degree is awarded at North Carolina State after a 
student has completed a course of study in specialized fields in agriculture 
and life sciences, education, engineering, forestry, physical sciences and 
applied mathematics, or textiles; demonstration of ability to read a modern 
foreign language; completion of a satisfactory thesis and of comprehensive 
examinations in the chosen field of study. 

In addition to complying with these requirements, the candidate for the 
Master of Science degree is expected to achieve high levels of scholarship. 
Graduate study is distinguished from undergraduate work by its emphasis 
upon independent research. The graduate student is more interested in the 
significance of facts than in the accumulation of data. He is concerned with 
the materials of learning and the organization and interpretation of these 
materials. 

A graduate student's program of study is planned so as to provide a com- 
prehensive view of some major field of interest and to furnish the training 
essential for successful research in this field and related areas of knowledge. 
As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of courses as is compatible 
with a well-defined major interest. The program of course work is selected 
with the object of making possible a reasonable mastery of the subject matter 
in a specialized field. Training in research is provided to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the methods, ideals, and goals of independent investigation. Since 
there are many possible combinations of courses, the administration of grad- 
uate programs calls for personal supervision of each student's plan of work 
by a special advisory committee of the graduate faculty. (See page 23). The 
program of course work to be followed by the student as a part of the require- 
ments for the master's degree and the thesis problem selected must be 
approved by the student's advisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 



The Erdahl-Cloyd Union is both 
the sponsor and the center for a 
broad range of concerts, lectures, 
and exhibits, ranging from an un- 
dergraduate experimental theater 
to appearances by international 
figures. Madame Nhu addressed an 
overflow student audience, the 
press, and the public (over WUNC- 
TV, the educational TV station) 
from the Union. 





The Union Gallery, now celebrating its 10th year 
anniversary, features outstanding exhibits in art, 
design, crafts, and photography. The Gallery is staffed 
by a volunteer committee, comprised of students in 
many academic fields, and provides exhibitions 
throughout the year. 



World renowned artists, present- 
ing concerts under the auspices of 
"The Friends of the College, Inc." 
sponsored by the Union, attract 
upwards of 12,000 persons. This is 
the Leningrad Philharmonic. Stu- 
dents are automatic members of the 
concert organization. 




THE GRADUATE CATALOG 23 



Credits 



1. For the Master of Science degree a minimum of 30 semester credits is 
required. 

2. No more than six of the academic credits required for the degree will be 
accepted from other institutions. 

3. No graduate credit will be awarded for excess undergraduate credit from 
another institution. 

4. All work credited toward a master's degree must be completed within six 
calendar years. 

5. No graduate credit is allowed for courses taken by correspondence. A 
maximum of six semester credits may be obtained in extension study in 
the field of education provided the extension courses are taught by a 
member of the graduate faculty and provided the courses are given grad- 
uate ranking by the Graduate School. Courses taken by extension are 
accepted for graduate credit only when the student has been admitted 
to the Graduate School and when notice of his registration is filed with 
the Graduate Office. Credit for extension courses reduces the amount of 
credit that may be transferred from other institutions by the amount of 
graduate credit granted. 

The thirty semester credit hour requirement for the master's degree 
represents the minimum quantity of work acceptable. The credit hours re- 
quired of graduate students usually exceed the minimum requirements. 
Inadequate preparation and thesis research frequently make additional work 
necessary. 

Courses of Study 

The program of the student shall include at least eight semester credits 
in courses of the 600 group, no more than six of which may be allowed for 
research study. At least twenty semester hours must come from the 500 and 
600 group. A maximum of two hours of seminar is permitted. 

During the first term in residence an advisory committee of at least three 
faculty members, one representing the minor field, will be appointed by the 
dean, after consultation with the head of the major department, for each 
student engaged in a program of work leading to the master's degree. The 
advisory committee will meet with the student and prepare a program of 
course work to meet the requirements of the student's graduate objectives. 
Four copies of the program, prepared on forms provided for this purpose, 
must be approved by each member of the committee, by the head of the 
major department, and by the Dean of the Graduate School. After approval 
in the Graduate Office, three copies will be returned to the department head— 
one for his files, one for the chairman of the advisory committee, and one for 
the student. 

The courses taken by a graduate student shall constitute a well rounded 
but unified plan of study. This means that the program of research and 
course work shall be divided between a major and a minor field. While there 
are no inflexible rules which govern the number of credit hours that must 
constitute the major and minor, in general, it is expected that approximately 



24 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

two-thirds of the course work will fall in the major and one-third in the 
minor. The detailed course requirements for each graduate student program 
are left to the judgment of the advisory committee. 

Residence 

Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master of Science 
degree are required to be in residence, pursuing graduate work, one full 
academic year. 

Class Work 

A graduate student is expected to show greater initiative in exploring the 
possibilities of the subject matter presented in the courses he takes than is 
the undergraduate. He is also expected to recognize the significance of facts 
and to assume a responsibility for relating data to theoretical concepts. In 
preparation, attendance, and in all the routine of class work the graduate 
student is subject to the regulations observed in other divisions of the Uni- 
versity. 

Grades 

A minimum grade of "C" must be made on all formal course work to 
obtain graduate credit. An average of "B" must be obtained on all course 
work taken as a part of the student's graduate program. Failure to maintain 
a "B" average in any term will place the student on probation. Any student 
whose academic record fails to meet the "B" average requirement for two 
consecutive terms will not be permitted to continue a graduate program 
without the written approval of the graduate dean. 

Grades in research, seminar, and special problem courses are given in terms 
of "S" (satisfactory) or "U" (unsatisfactory) in place of the symbols used 
for formal course work. 

The grade incomplete may be used in research and laboratory courses when 
circumstances beyond the control of the student have prevented completion 
of the work by the end of the academic term. A grade of incomplete may be 
given only after approval by the graduate dean and must be converted to 
one of the usual symbols before the end of the next academic semester in 
which the student is in residence. 

Language Requirements 

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language (Germanic, 
Romance, or Slavic) is required of candidates for the Master of Science 
degree. 

The language requirement must be satisfied before a student can be ad- 
mitted to candidacy. 

Proficiency in languages is determined by the Department of Modern 
Languages: 

1. By traditional reading knowledge examination at any time requested 
by the student. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 25 

2. By taking course work (audit) especially designed for graduate students 
who have no previous foreign language experience or who wish to refresh 
work formerly done. The department offers special courses beginning 
with elementary grammar and proceeding in the course of the semester 
to general scientific reading. Pronunciation is emphasized to the degree 
to which it will help in translating from the language into English. 
This first course is followed by a second course in which the student 
selects work from scientific publications touching as nearly as possible 
his major interest. He will then be assigned a particular instructor 
with whom he will read in individual conferences. When the conference 
instructor is satisfied that the student has demonstrated his knowledge 
of intricate grammatical problems, a decrease in the time required for 
reading, and a confidence in his ability to use the language, he will be 
certified without further examination. The completed translations may 
then, depending upon their merit, be edited and prepared for 
permanent filing with the various translation libraries throughout the 
country. 
Graduate students who expect to complete the requirements for the 
Master of Science degree should confer with the Head of the Department of 
Modern Languages soon after registration to formulate plans for meeting 
the language requirement of this degree. 

Students whose native language is other than English may meet the foreign 
language requirement for the Master of Science degree by demonstrating a 
satisfactory mastery of English. Examinations in English are conducted by 
the English Department. 

Thesis 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree must prepare a thesis repre- 
senting an original investigation. The subject of the thesis must be approved 
by the head of the department in which the major work is done and by the 
student's advisory committee. Three copies of the thesis in final form and 
five copies of the abstract must be filed in the Graduate Office at least one 
month before the degree is awarded. Detailed instructions as to form and 
organization of the thesis may be obtained at the Graduate Office. 

Examinations 

All candidates for the Master of Science degree must pass, with a grade of 
"A", "B", or "C", all formal course work specified as part of the requirements 
for the degree. Graduate credit for research, seminar, and special problem 
courses is granted when a grade of "S" is recorded in the Registration Office. 
In addition, the candidate must pass a comprehensive oral examination that 
is held to satisfy the examining committee that the candidate possesses a 
reasonable mastery of knowledge in the major and minor fields and that this 
knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. This examination may 
not be held until all other requirements, except completing the course work 
of the last semester, are satisfied. Application for the comprehensive oral 
examination must be filed with the graduate dean by the chairman of the 



26 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

advisory committee at least two weeks prior to the date on which the exami- 
nation is to be held. 

The oral examination will be conducted by an examining committee ap- 
pointed by the graduate dean. The chairman of the examining committee 
will be the chairman of the student's advisory committee. At least two addi- 
tional members will be appointed to represent the major and minor fields. 
The comprehensive oral examination is open to all faculty members who care 
to attend but the decision as to the candidate's fitness rests solely with the 
examining committee. 

At the discretion of the examining committee, written examinations cover- 
ing the subject matter in the major and minor fields also may be required 
of the candidate. Written examinations, when required, may not be held 
earlier than the end of the first month of the last semester in residence, and 
not later than one week before the comprehensive oral examination. 
See Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree below. 

Master's Degree in a Professional Field 

This degree is offered for students who are interested in the more advanced 
applications of fundamental principles to specialized fields rather than in the 
acquisition of the broader background in the advanced scientific studies 
which would fit them for careers in research. Students working for this degree 
ordinarily will terminate their graduate work at this point. 

Examples of the types of degrees that may be awarded upon the completion 
of the course of study in a professional field are Master of Education, Master 
of Forestry, Master of Agricultural Engineering, Master of Applied Mathe- 
matics, Master of Experimental Statistics, Master of Electrical Engineering, 
and Master of Textile Technology. 

The chief characteristic of these degrees is that the changes made in 
requirements permit, in greater measure, the satisfaction of what are repre- 
sented as professional needs than do the requirements for the conventional 
Master of Science degree. 

Language Requirements 

The candidate for a master's degree in a professional field is exempt from 
the requirement of a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. 

Thesis Requirements 

In the School of Education the thesis requirement for the master's 
degree in each of the specialized fields may be waived by the department in 
which the degree is sought. When the thesis requirement is waived the stu- 
dent must complete the course "Introduction to Educational Research," or a 
departmental course in research and a problem report. A thesis is required 
for the professional degree in the departments of the School of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. A thesis is not required in the Master of Forestry, Master 
of Applied Mathematics, Master of Experimental Statistics, Master of Elec- 
trical Engineering and Master of Textile Technology programs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 27 



Other Requirements 



The other requirements for the master's degree in a professional field are 
the same as for the Master of Science degree. 

Master of Agriculture Degree 

This plan is offered for the students who are interested in advanced train- 
ing in the broad field of agriculture but whose responsibility is not in re- 
search. The requirements for the degree are designed to provide an oppor- 
tunity for professional training without narrow specialization for those who 
plan to devote their lives to some phase of practical agriculture. Among the 
individuals interested in this degree are agricultural extension workers and 
foreign students who are in action or educational programs. The proposed 
plan differs from the plan for the Master of Science degree in the following 
principal respects: 

1. A total of thirty-six semester credits is required. 

2. A minimum of four semester credits in special problems is required. Not 
more than six semester credits in special problems will be allowed. This 
work replaces the research thesis requirement for the Master of Science 
degree. 

3. There are no specific requirements as to courses in the 600 group. 

4. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is not required. 
In all other respects the requirements for the Master of Agriculture degree 

are the same as those for the Master of Science degree. 

A Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or 
department head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate School or department 
head. 

3. Receipt of application form and transcript by Graduate School. 

4. Application with transcript sent to department head for study. 

5. Department head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work and the degree sought. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic 
standards, notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate School. 
When the student's academic record fails to meet the minimum scho- 
lastic standards of the Graduate School, provisional admission may be 
granted upon submission by the student of evidence of a satisfactory 
performance on the Graduate Record or National Teacher Examina- 
tions. The National Teacher Examination is accepted only when 
approved by the department head and the graduate dean. 

7. Permit to register is sent by the Graduate School to the registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the department head, is assigned an advisor 
and makes out a roster of courses in consultation with departmental 
advisor. 



28 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

9. Advisory committee of three or more faculty members, one of whom 
represents the minor field, appointed before the end of the first semester 
of graduate study by the Graduate School after consultation with the 
department head. 

10. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with 
the student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate School by 
the end of the first semester in residence. 

11. Plan of work approved by the graduate dean and three copies returned 
to the department head. One copy is kept in department files, one 
goes to the advisor, and one is given to the student. 

12. A thesis subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research sub- 
mitted to the department head and to the student's advisory committee. 
Students preparing themselves for the professional degree in specialized 
fields of education should consult the chairman of their committees 
with reference to their problem report. 

13. Student passes language examination. Students preparing themselves for 
the master's degree in a professional field are not required to pass a 
language examination. The language requirement must be satisfied 
before admission to candidacy can be granted. 

14. Student applies for admission to candidacy for the master's degree. 
Application must be filed before the end of the first week of the last 
semester in residence and may not be filed before the language require- 
ment is satisfied. 

15. Application is reviewed by the head of the major department and by 
the graduate dean and if approved the student becomes a candidate 
for the degree. 

16. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is submitted to the chairman 
of the student's committee for criticism. 

17. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chairman of 
the student's advisory committee submits a corrected draft of the dis- 
sertation to members for review. 

18. Permission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is re- 
quested of the Graduate School at least two weeks before the examina- 
tion and must be accompanied by a certification that the thesis is com- 
plete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the 
final examination. 

19. Permission is granted by the graduate dean— date is set and examining 
committee appointed. The report on the final examination should be 
filed with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has been 
completed. 

20. Three copies of the thesis in final form approved by each member of 
the student's advisory committee and signed by the advisor must be 
submitted to the Graduate School at least four weeks before the end of 
the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. 

21. Graduate School certifies to the Registration Office and to the general 
faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and recom- 
mends the awarding of the degree. 

22. Student must be registered in term in which degree is to be awarded. 



Memorial Tower, located at the main 
entrance to the campus, has become the 
traditional symbol of North Carolina State. 
The 122 foot tower, built in memory of 
State alumni lost in World War I, is 
equipped with carillon bells which ring out 
the alma mater three times daily. 




Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the following depart- 
ments: 

Agricultural Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Animal Science 

Applied Mathematics 

Applied Physics 

Botany and Bacteriology (in the fields of bacteriology, 

physiology and ecology) 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Crop Science 
Electrical Engineering 
Entomology 
Experimental Statistics 
Food Science 
Forestry 
Genetics 
Mechanical Engineering 



30 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Mineral Industries (in the field of ceramic engineering) 

Nuclear Engineering 

Physiology 

Plant Pathology 

Rural Sociology 

Soil Science 

Zoology (in the fields of ecology and wildlife biology) 
The doctor's degree symbolizes the fact that the recipient is capable of 
undertaking original research and scholarly work at the highest levels with- 
out supervision. Therefore, the Doctor of Philosophy degree is not granted 
on a basis of the successful completion of a given amount of course work, but 
rather upon the demonstration by the candidate of a comprehensive knowl- 
edge and high attainments in scholarship and research in a specialized field 
of study. These attainments are determined by the quality of the dissertation 
which the candidate prepares to report the results of original investigations 
and by passing successfully a series of rigorous and comprehensive examina- 
tions on the special and related fields of study. 

Course of Study 

At the time of admission the student should, with the advice of the chair- 
man of the department, elect a major field. During the student's first semester 
in residence, an advisory committee of at least four members will be appointed 
by the graduate dean, after consultation with the department head, to prepare 
with the student a plan of graduate work. Four copies of the program, signed 
by all members of the advisory committee and the department head or grad- 
uate administrator, are referred to the graduate dean for approval. When 
approved three copies are returned to the department head, one being re- 
tained in the department files, a second copy is given to the chairman of the 
advisory committee, and the third copy is given to the student. The subject 
of the dissertation must appear on the plan of work and any subsequent 
changes in the subject of the thesis or in the plan of graduate work must be 
reported to the Graduate School for approval. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the doctor's degree. 
Emphasis is placed upon a comprehensive knowledge of a well defined and 
recognized field and related subjects. Each student will have a major and one 
or two minor areas of specialization. The minor field ordinarily will consist 
of at least twenty semester credit hours. These may fall in an allied depart- 
ment or in the major department. A minor in the department of the major 
is permitted only when the department offers recognized divisions of study 
other than that designated as the major field. 

Residence 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the student is expected to be register- 
ed for graduate work for at least six semesters beyond the bachelor's degree 
at some accredited graduate school. The amount of work from other institu- 
tions credited to the fulfillment of degree requirements will be determined 
by the dean after consultation with the student's advisory committee at the 
time the plan of graduate work is filed. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 31 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in con- 
tinuous residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate stu- 
dent at some branch of the Consolidated University of North Carolina. 
Failure to take work during the summer does not break the continuity; how- 
ever, summer school work can be used to fulfill this requirement. 

Residence credit is based on the number of credits of graduate work beyond 
the bachelor's degree carried in a given term. During a regular semester, 
residence credit is calculated in the following manner: 

Semester Credits Residence Credits 
9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than six* 1/3 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is only one-half the 
corresponding amount for a regular semester; i.e., six semester credits carry 
1/3 residence credit and less than six credits, 1/6 residence credit. If a student 
registers for a twelve-week summer term, the residence credit is computed as 
for regular semesters. If a student registers for both twelve-week and six- 
week summer terms, the residence credit is computed separately for each type 
and totaled, with the stipulation that no more than one residence credit can 
be earned in a given summer. 

The candidate must complete all requirements for the degree, including 
the final examination on his dissertation, within a period of seven calendar 
years from the date of admission to candidacy for the degree. 

Languages 

A reading knowledge of scientific literature in two modern foreign lan- 
guages or a comprehension in depth of one language is required for the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Comprehension in depth is to be interpreted as a proven ability in the 
oral and composition elements of a particular language as well as the reading 
knowledge normally required. Ph.D. students desiring to offer one language 
in depth should consult with the Head of the Modern Languages Department 
as to the specific courses to be followed to achieve this comprehension. 
Specific arrangements may differ depending upon the student's previous 
background in the language. It is emphasized that students choosing to 
achieve competence in depth in one language will generally find this 
alternative more rigorous than proof of reading ability in two languages. 

If the student elects to work in two languages, the languages may be a 
combination of Romance and Slavic, Romance and Germanic, or Slavic and 
Germanic. 

Students whose native tongue is some language other than English may 
use English as one of the languages required for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the language 
requirements, the native language may not be used to satisfy one of the 
language requirements. 



* Including registration for thesis preparation on campus. 



32 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Examinations in English will be given by the English Department, and a 
statement certifying the candidate's proficience in English must be filed in 
the Graduate Office before the qualifying examination may be taken. 

The Dissertation 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the candidate's original 
investigations in the field of his major interests. It must represent a contribu- 
tion to knowledge, adequately supported by data and written in a manner 
consistent with high standards of excellence in scholarship. Detailed instruc- 
tions relating to the thesis may be obtained from the Graduate Office. 

Publication of the results obtained in the thesis investigation is expected. 
Each copy of the thesis must be accompanied by an abstract of approximately 
500 words. 

The dissertation will be examined by all members of the examining com- 
mittee and must receive their approval to be acceptable to the Graduate 
Office. 

Two copies of the dissertation in final form and signed by all members of 
the student's advisory committee must be presented to the Graduate School 
not later than four weeks before the date on which the degree is to be 
awarded. 

North Carolina State now has an agreement with University Microfilms, 
Inc., of Ann Arbor, Michigan, by which all doctoral dissertations are micro- 
filmed and abstracts of the dissertations are published in Dissertation 
Abstracts. 

Examinations 

Not earlier than the end of the second year of graduate study and not 
later than the end of the third week of the academic year in which the 
degree is expected, each doctoral student is required to pass general com- 
prehensive examinations (known as the qualifying or preliminary examina- 
tions) . If summer sessions are involved, the interval between the date of the 
qualifying examinations and anticipated date of the awarding of the degree 
may be interpreted as including two consecutive summer sessions and one 
academic semester. The examinations are given by an examining committee 
of graduate faculty members appointed by the graduate dean after consulta- 
tion with the head of the department in which the student's major work has 
been taken. The examining committee usually consists of the student's ad- 
visory committee and a representative of the Graduate School, but may 
include other members of the graduate faculty. The examinations are open 
to all members of the graduate faculty who may care to attend. 

Authorization for the qualifying examination is requested of the Graduate 
School by the chairman of the student's advisory committee when the major 
part of the student's program of course work has been completed and when, 
in the judgment of the committee, the student is prepared to devote the 
greater part of his time to the prosecution of his research study. Members of 
the examining committee will be notified of their appointment by the Grad- 
uate Office. Official printed forms will be supplied to the chairman of the 
examining committee for a report of the results of the examination. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 33 

The examination consists of two parts: (1) written examinations prepared 
separately by each member of the examining committee and (2) an oral 
examination held before the entire examining committee. Upon receiving 
authorization for holding the qualifying examination, the chairman of the 
examining committee will request examination questions from each member 
of the examining committee. Each set of questions will be given to the stu- 
dent by the chairman of the examining committee in any order that may 
seem appropriate. The questions together with the student's answers will be 
returned to the members of the committee for grading. The questions may 
cover any phase of the course work taken by the student during the period 
of his graduate study or any subject logically related and basic to an under- 
standing of the subject matter of the major and minor areas of study. They 
should be designed to measure the student's mastery of these subject matter 
fields and the adequacy of his preparation for research investigations. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written examinations the student must 
pass an oral examination before the entire examining committee. This exami- 
nation is usually held within a week after the chairman of the examining 
committee has certified to the Graduate School that the student has com- 
pleted satisfactorily the written examinations. The members of the examining 
committee will be notified by the Graduate School of the time and place 
arranged for the oral examination. The oral examination is designed to test 
the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to specific circumstances. In 
the oral examination the student is expected to use his knowledge with 
accuracy and promptness and to demonstrate that his thinking is not limited 
to the facts learned in course work. 

When the examining committee consists of four members, a unanimous 
vote of approval is required for passing the preliminary examination. Ap- 
proval may be conditioned, however, upon the completion of additional work 
in some particular field to the satisfaction of the committee. In case a single 
dissenting vote is cast in a four member committee, the course of action to be 
taken will become a matter for decision by the Administrative Board. Upon 
receiving the approval of the examining committee the student is admitted 
to candidacy for the doctorate. 

A final oral examination is also required. During a normal academic year, 
an interval of at least eight months must elapse between admission to 
candidacy and the final oral examination. If summer sessions are involved, 
this interval may be interpreted to include two consecutive summer sessions 
and one academic semester. 

This examination is held after the dissertation has been completed and 
consists of a defense by the candidate of the methods used and the conclusions 
reached in his research study. The examination is conducted by an examining 
committee. The examining committee usually includes the student's advisory 
committee, plus a representative of the Graduate School, although this 
procedure is not always adopted. The examining committee is appointed by 
the graduate dean after consultation with the head of the student's major 
department. 

Failure of a student to pass either the preliminary or the final examination 
terminates his graduate work at this institution unless otherwise recommended 



34 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

by the examining committee. No re-examination may be given until at least 
one full semester has elapsed since the first examination. Only one re- 
examination is permitted. 
See Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy Degree below. 

Admission to Candidacy 

A student is admitted to candidacy after he has successfully passed the 
preliminary examinations. The language requirements must be fulfilled be- 
fore permission to take the preliminary examination is granted. Admission to 
candidacy must be obtained before the end of the third week in the academic 
year in which the degree is expected; i.e., nearly two semesters before the 
degree is awarded. 

Additional Information 

A booklet containing detailed instruction about the form of dissertation 
may be obtained from the Graduate School. 

Further information concerning graduate work at North Carolina State may 
be secured from Dr. Walter J. Peterson, Dean of the Graduate School, North 
Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at Raleigh, Raleigh, N. C. 

Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or 
department head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate School or department 
head. 

3. Receipt of application forms by Graduate School. 

4. Application with transcript sent to department head for study. 

5. Department head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic 
standards, notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate School. 

7. Permit to register is sent by Graduate School to the registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the department head, is assigned an advisor, 
and makes out a roster of courses in consultation with departmental 
advisor. 

9. Advisory committee of at least four members is appointed in the first 
term of graduate study by the graduate dean after consultation with 
the department head. 

10. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with 
the student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate School by 
the end of the first semester in residence. 

11. Plan of work approved by the graduate dean and three copies returned 
to the department head. One copy is kept in department files, one goes 
to the advisor, and one is given to the student. 

12. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the department head and the student's advisory committee. 

13. Student passes language examinations. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 35 

14. The chairman of the student's advisory committee requests permission 
to hold the qualifying examination. This must be done not earlier than 
the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than eight 
months (two semesters or one semester and two summer sessions) before 
the date on which the degree is to be awarded. 

15. Permission to take qualifying examination granted by graduate dean if 

the student's record is in order. A date is set and examining committee 
appointed. The examination consists of two parts— a written and an oral. 

16. A report of the examination is sent to the Graduate School. If the report 
is favorable, the student is admitted to candidacy. 

17. A copy of a preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the 
chairman of the student's committee for criticism. 

18. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the Chairman 
of the student's advisory committee submits a corrected draft of the 
dissertation to members for review. 

19. Eight months (or two terms) after admission to candidacy or later, 
permission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is re- 
quested of the Graduate School by the Chairman of the candidate's 
advisory committee. Requests should be filed at least two weeks before 
the date of the examination and must be accompanied by a certification 
that the thesis is complete except for such revisions as may be necessary 
as a result of the final examination. 

20. Permission is granted by the graduate dean if the student's record is in 
order. A date is set and examining committee appointed. The report 
on the examination should be filed with Graduate School as soon as 
examination has been completed. 

21. Two copies of the thesis in final form must be submitted to the Grad- 
uate School not later than four weeks before the date on which the 
degree is to be awarded. It must carry the signatures of all members of 
the examining committee. 

22. Graduate School certifies to the Registration Office and to the general 
faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and recom- 
mends the awarding of the degree. 

23. Student must be registered in the term in which the degree is to be 
awarded. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Tuition rates for students enrolled in the Graduate School at North Caro- 
lina State are as follows: 

North Carolina resident— $9 per semester hour for each semester 
hour of enrollment up to and including nine semester hours. For 
ten semester hours or more, $87.50 for the semester. 
Non-resident— $32 per semester hour for each semester hour of en- 
rollment up to and including nine semester hours. For ten semester 
hours or more, $300 for the semester. 
Incidental fees and charges are levied for purposes and services available 
to all graduate students whether or not the student takes advantage of them. 



36 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The full amount of incidental fees and charges will be collected, notwith- 
standing the number of semester hours of credit for which the student may 
enroll, 

For the academic year 1964-65, fees are as follows. 

First semester $73 

Second semester $67 

In cases of occasional or part-time graduate students not in residence 
application for cancellation of non-academic fees may be made if it is clear 
that the student could not use the services covered. Application forms are 
available in the Graduate School and the Office of Business Affairs. 

Full-time staff or faculty members may be permitted to take one course 
per semester on the North Carolina State campus at a rate of $9 per semester 
hour plus a $7 registration fee or to audit one course at a charge of $17.00, 
in either case upon the recommendation of their department head and ap- 
proval of their dean and the Business Manager. This payment does not in- 
clude non-academic fees, and none of the privileges attendant upon the pay- 
ment of such fees is allowed. Forms for this approval are available in the 
Office of Business Affairs. A maximum of 8 semester hours may be taken 
during the academic year. 

Faculty members on less than full-time appointments will be permitted to 
take more than one course per semester upon the recommendation of their 
dean and the approval of both the Dean of the Graduate School and the 
Dean of the Faculty. In these cases tuition and fees will be the same as those 
for part-time graduate students computed at residence rates. 

Maximum permissible course loads for graduate students holding part-time 
appointments are as follows: Three-quarters time, six hours; half-time, nine 
hours; quarter-time, twelve hours. 

Students wishing to visit classes without participation in class discussions, 
quizzes, or examinations must register for this privilege as auditors. Visiting 
classes without registration is not permitted. Graduate students may register 
for one course as an audit in any semester without charge when the audit is 
certified by the Dean of the Graduate School as a part of course work for 
which tuition charges are made (this does not apply in the summer sessions) . 

Audits in subjects in which the student has had no previous experience will 
be evaluated at full credit value in determining course loads. Audits taken as 
repetition of work previously accomplished are considered at one-half their 
credit value in calculating course loads. With the single exception of foreign 
language audits, all audit registrations must fall within the maximum per- 
missible course loads. Audits are not permitted students registering for thesis 
preparation. While audit registrations are evaluated for purposes of de- 
termining permissive course loads in terms of the above regulations of the 
Graduate School, the Office of Business Affairs considers all audits, excepting 
the one permitted free of charge, in terms of full credit value in calculating 
the tuition for graduate students. 

All graduate students holding appointments of 1/3 service obligation or 
more and receiving a regular monthly salary check are charged the resident 
or "in-state" rate of tuition. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 37 

Graduate students who have completed all course work and residence 
requirements and who are in residence for the purpose of writing a thesis 
or dissertation may register for "thesis preparation." The tuition charge for 
this registration is $15. Students registering for thesis preparation will pay, 
in addition, fees of $73 in the fall semester and $67 in the spring semester. 

Graduate students not in residence who have completed all requirements 
for the degree sought, including the thesis and final examination, will be 
required to register for "degree only" in the semester in which the degree 
is awarded. The charge for this registration is $10. 

A diploma fee of $12 is charged all students receiving a master's degree and 
a fee of $17 is charged all students who receive a doctorate. A fee of $21 is 
charged all doctoral candidates for microfilming their dissertations. 

Anyone who feels a mistake has been made in his bill may discuss the 
matter with the Office of Business Affairs. Any further appeals should be made 
to the Committee on Refund of Fees. Forms for this appeal may be obtained 
from the Office of Business Affairs. 

All tuition charges and fees are subject to change without notice. 

Fees for Summer School 

Registration Fee $1 1 .00 

Tuition (In-State Students per credit hour) $ 7.50 

Tuition (Out-of-State Students per credit hour) $18.50 

Audits (per credit hour) $ 7.50 

In order to draw a clear line between in-state and out-of-state students, 
the Administration has ruled that all students whose parents have not been 
domiciled in North Carolina for more than six months immediately preceding 
the day of their first enrollment in the institution shall be termed out-of- 
state students, with the following exceptions. 

(1) Students twenty-one years of age at the time of their first matricula- 
tion who have resided in North Carolina for more than one year 
preceding the day of their first enrollment; 

(2) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government stationed 
in the State of North Carolina; and 

(3) Children of regular employees of the Federal Government who are 
employed outside of the State, but who through law are permitted to 
retain their North Carolina citizenship. 

Students cannot claim a change in their resident status after matriculating. 
Students furnishing incomplete or incorrect information in order to obtain 
the special State-resident status shall be liable for dishonorable dismissal. 

Graduate students employed by the University or the Experiment Station 
on a part-time basis are not permitted to register for a full-time load of 
course work. The Veterans Administration will classify such students as full- 
time students when it is officially certified by the Dean of the Graduate 
School that the students are engaged in a full-time program of professional 
work. 



38 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FELLOWSHIPS AND GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships 

Graduate fellowships are funds offered to graduate students to assist in the 
support of programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships have no 
service obligations to the University and may devote full time to the 
prosecution of their graduate programs. 

Some of the agencies sponsoring fellowships at North Carolina State are 
the Alcoa, ASEE-Leeds Northrup, Atomic Energy Commission, Celanese 
Corporation, Chemstrand, Douglas Aircraft Company, DuPont Company, 
E. Sig Johnson, Eastman Kodak Company, Edward Orton, Jr., Ceramic 
Foundation, Ford Foundation, General Electric, General Foods Corporation, 
Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Kellogg, Mortex Chemical Products, North 
Carolina Grange (E. G. Moss Fellowship) , National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, 
Office of Education of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Rockefeller Foundation, Shell Oil Com- 
pany, Sperry Gyroscope Company, Union Carbide Corporation, and Westing- 
house. 

Information relative to stipends, areas of research study supported by 
specific fellowships, and application forms may be obtained from the Grad- 
uate School or from the heads of the appropriate departments. 

Assistantships 

Graduate assistantships are granted to selected students who devote some 
part of their time to service duties for the University. Teaching assistantships 
carry stipends ranging from $2,400 to $2,700 for the academic year and permit 
the holder to enroll for sixty per cent of a full course load. The stipends for 
research assistantships range from $2,700 to $3,000 for a 12 months' appoint- 
ment. The University offers 350 assistantships which require a service obliga- 
tion in either teaching or research. Some of these are supported by funds 



The new $1,000,000 General Laboratories Building provides laboratory and office 
space for the Departments of Physics and Statistics and major portions of the School 
of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. The six story building is joined by a 
ramp to Harrelson Hall. 




THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



39 



granted by the following agencies: the American Potash Institute, the Atomic 
Energy Commission, Best Foods, Campbell Soup Company, the Chilean 
Nitrate Education Bureau, Inc., Gerber Products Company, Hercules Powder 
Company, the Lilliston Implement Company, the Lilly Company, National 
Cotton Council, the North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, the North 
Carolina Dairy Foundation, the North Carolina Milk Commission, the Office 
of Naval Research, the Pacific Coast Borax Company, Peanut Growers Asso- 
ciation, Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., the Ralston-Purina Company, 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Shell Oil Company, the Tennessee Cor- 
poration, the Solvay Process Division of the Allied Chemical Company, Union 
Carbide Chemicals Company, and the Weyerhaeuser Foundation. 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Dormitory facilities are provided on the campus for unmarried graduate 
students. The rental charge for double rooms is $85 per semester. A limited 
number of apartments are provided for married graduate students. 




■ —J 

If /-^- 






McKimmon Village is State's mar- 
ried student housing facility. The 
17 building community, located 
west of the campus, contains ef- 
ficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom apart- 
ments for 300 married students. 
The inset is of the living area of a 
newly opened apartment. 







40 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 

Departmental Announcements and Description of Courses* 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Charles Edwin Bishop, Head, George L. Capel, Arthur James 
Coutu, Herman Brooks James, Richard Adams King, James Gray 
Maddox, Walter Henry Pierce, George Stanford Tolley, William 
Douglas Toussaint, James Claude Williamson, Jr. 

Associate Professors: William Ray Henry, Dale Max Hoover, Paul R. 
Johnson, Charles Ray Pugh, James Arthur Seagraves, Richard Lee 
Simmons, Thomas Dudley Wallace 

Assistant Professors: Loren Albert Ihnen, Edgar Walton Jones, Ernest 
Caleb Pasour, Jr., Ralph James Peeler 

USDA Agricultural Economist: Joseph Gwyn Sutherland 

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers programs of study lead- 
ing to the Master of Agricultural Economics, the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Special emphasis is placed on the economics of 
agricultural production and marketing, analysis of programs and policies 
affecting agriculture and statistical techniques used in solving economic 
problems of the agricultural industry. The curriculum includes courses in 
advanced economic theory with special attention to agricultural problems 
including the use of econometric and linear programming techniques. Busi- 
ness management analysis, operations analysis and programming of firm and 
industry decisions are emphasized. Special attention is given to public policies 
influencing regional and national agricultural adjustments. 

Collateral fields of study include statistics, rural sociology, history and 
political science, general economics,, agricultural education, and various 
technical departments in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

As a part of their advanced training, students are required to prepare a 
thesis dealing with a recognized problem in agriculture. This part of the pro- 
gram affords an opportunity to learn how to apply theory and analytical 
techniques in the solution of agricultural problems. 

The rapid growth and development of industry and agriculture in North 
Carolina and throughout the South have resulted in an increased demand for 
well-trained workers throughout the region. Opportunities for employment 
far exceed the number of qualified workers available to perform the many 
duties associated with the complex and technical problems of a developing 
economy. Many graduates of the Department of Agricultural Economics are 
employed in various agencies of the Federal and State government where they 
are engaged in research and educational work. Others are engaged in pro- 
fessional work with commercial organizations dealing in agricultural credit 
and the production and marketing of agricultural products. 

* The course descriptions are planned for the academic years, 1964-65 and 1965-66, unless 
indicated otherwise. Specific courses may not be offered, however, if registration for the 
course or courses is too low or if faculty or facilities are not available. Courses in the 500 
series are open to both seniors and graduate students. All courses in this series carry full 
graduate credit. Courses in the 600 series are open only to graduate students. Master's 
programs must include not less than 20 semester hours from courses in the 500 and 600 series. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 41 

The department is located on the second floor of Patterson Hall. It has a 
modern and well equipped departmental library, including all the major 
professional journals and United States Department of Agriculture publica- 
tions. Experiment Station publications from other institutions throughout 
the United States are kept on file. Modern reproducing equipment is owned 
by the department, and used on many theses. 

Computational facilities are ideal for students whose research problems 
involve extensive manipulation of data as well as for those students who 
want to learn to do their own programming. The department has a well 
trained clerical staff and owns one-half interest in an IBM 1620 computer. 
The University-wide computing center has an IBM 1410 at Raleigh and a 
Rand 1105 at Chapel Hill. Several analogue computers and a LINC-III com- 
puter are also located on the Raleigh campus. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGC 512. Economic Analysis of Agricultural Factor Markets 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or Equivalent 

An examination of the roles of land, labor and capital as factors of produc- 
tion in a modern agricultural economy, including major changes in the roles 
of these factors in recent years; analysis of changes in the supply and demand 
for the factors; a review of the structure and efficiency of markets for the 
factors, including relevance of the institutional and attitudinal setting in each 
type of market and an investigation of the nature of the demand-supply 
equilibration; a consideration of public policies relating to the use of the 
factors of production in agriculture in relation to theories of economic 
growth, with particular attention to land, credit, education and research 
programs affecting the factors of production used in agriculture in develop- 
ing economies. Mr. Tolley. 

AGC 521. Procurement, Processing and Distribution of Agricultural Products 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 311 or Equivalent 

A study of marketing firms as producers of marketing services and their 
role in the pricing process; the influence of government policies on their 
behavior of marketing firms; methods for increasing the efficiency of market- 
ing agricultural products. Mr. Simmons. 

AGC 523. Planning Farm and Area Adjustments 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 303 or Equivalent 

The application of economic principles in the solution of production prob- 
lems on typical farms in the State; methods and techniques of economic 
analysis of the farm business; application of research findings to production 
decisions; development of area agricultural programs. Mr. Pasour. 

AGC 533. Agricultural Policy 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or Equivalent 

A review of the agricultural policy and action programs of the Federal 
Government in their economic and political setting; analysis of objectives, 
principal means, and observable results under short-term and long-term 
viewpoints, and under the criteria of resource use and income distribution 
within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the economy; 
appraisal of alternative policy proposals; the effects of commodity support 



42 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

programs on domestic and foreign consumption, and some of the inter- 
national aspects of United States agricultural policy; the attempts at world 
market regulation, and the role of international organizations, agreements, 
and programs. Mr. Hoover. 

AGC 551. Agricultural Production Economics 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or Equivalent 

An economic analysis of agricultural production, including production 
functions, cost functions, programming and decision-making principles; and 
the applications of these principles to farm and regional resource allocation, 
and to the distribution of income to and within agriculture. 

Mr. Toussaint. 

AGC 552. Consumption, Distribution, and Prices in Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 212 or Equivalent 

Basis for family decisions concerning consumption of goods and services 
and supply of productive factors; forces determining prices and incomes; 
interrelationships between economic decisions of the household and the firm. 

Mr. West. 

AGC 592. Topical Problems in Agricultural Economics Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

An examination of current problems in the field of agricultural economics 
with emphasis on the use of theory to define and facilitate the consideration 
of alternative solutions. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

AGC 602. Monetary and Fiscal Policies in Relation to Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 551 or Equivalent 

Aggregative theory needed to evaluate monetary and fiscal policies; funda- 
mentals of model building; models involving income, employment, price 
levels, money supply, interest rates and other aggregative variables; relation 
of the models to the main economic magnitudes for the United States 
economy; institutional determinants of monetary and fiscal operations in the 
United States; stabilization, growth and equity objectives in relation to the 
structure of taxes and government revenue and current government policies; 
introduction to international monetary equilibrium and the relation of 
monetary-fiscal policies to agricultural incomes and prices. 

Mr. Tolley. 

AGC 611. Agricultural Economic Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 112, AGC 551 or Equivalent 

An economic analysis of agricultural products and inputs. Includes analysis 
of price-determining forces and factors influencing distribution of income 
within agriculture and between agriculture and the rest of the economy. 
Production, cost and demand functions are stressed, along with program- 
ming and decision-making principles and their application to decisions at 
the firm level and to regional resource allocation. Mr. Ihnen. 

AGC 612. International Trade in Relation to Agriculture 0-3 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: AGC 602, AGC 641 

The principles of international and interregional trade; structures of trade 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 43 

relationships between countries engaged in the import or export of agricul- 
tural products; attempts at stabilizing trade and financial transactions. 

Mr. Johnson. 

AGC 631. Economic and Social Foundations of Agricultural Policy 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 551 or Equivalent 

The study of logical and empirical problems of inquiry into public policies 
and programs that affect agriculture; analysis of policy-making processes, 
interdependencies among economic, political and social objectives and action; 
the study of forces which shape economic institutions and goals and of the 
logic, beliefs and values on which policies and programs that affect agricul- 
ture are founded. Graduate Staff. 

AGC 632. Welfare Effects of Agricultural Policies and Programs 0-3 

Prerequisite: AGC 642 

Description of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; applica- 
tion of the conditions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic policies 
and programs affecting resource allocation, income distribution, and economic 
development of agriculture. Mr. Bishop. 

AGC 641. Economics of Production, Supply and Market Interdependency 0-3 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: AGC 611, MA 211 or Equivalent 
An advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer 
behavior and choice among combinations of factors and kinds and quantities 
of output; aggregative consequences of individuals' and firms' decisions in 
terms of product supply and factor demand; factor markets and income dis- 
tribution; general interdependency among economic variables. 

Messrs. Seagraves, Toussaint. 

AGC 642. Economics of Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency 3-0 

Prerequisites: AGC 641, ST 513 or Equivalent 

An advanced study in the theory of, and research related to, household 
behavior; aggregative consequences of household decisions concerning factor 
supply and product demand; pricing and income distribution; economic 
equilibrium. Mr. Simmons. 

AGC 65 1 . (St 65 1 ) Econometric Methods I 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 421, ST 502, AGC 611 or Equivalent 

The role and uses of statistical inference in agricultural economic research; 
measurement problems and their solutions arising from the statistical model 
and the nature of the data; limitations and interpretation of results of 
economic measurement from statistical techniques. Topics include the prob- 
lems of specification, aggregation, identification, multicolinearity and auto- 
correlation. Attention also is given to expectations models and simultaneous 
stochastic equations. Mr. Wallace. 

AGC 652. (See ST 652. Econometric Methods II.) 

AGC 671. Analysis of Economic Development in Agriculture 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGC 641 

A theoretical and empirical study of the processes of economic growth; the 
problems of underdeveloped countries; the role of agriculture in a develop- 
ing economy; an examination of policies and programs needed for effective 
economic development. Mr. Maddox. 



44 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

AGC 699. Research in Agricultural Economics Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in Agricultural Economics, Consent of 
Graduate Advisory Committee 

A consideration of research methods and procedures employed in the field of 
agricultural economics, including qualitative and quantitative analysis, in- 
ductive and deductive methods of research procedure, selection of projects, 
planning and execution of the research project. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
(See School of Education) 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Francis Jefferson Hassler, Head, Henry Dittmus Bowen, 

William Eldon Splinter, Jan Van Schilfgaarde 
Professor Emeritus: David S. Weaver 
Associate Professor: Charles Wilson Suggs 
Assistant Professors: James William Dickens, Barney Kuo-Yen Huang, 

William Hugh Johnson, Kenneth Allan Jordan, David Alan Link, 

Cliff R. Willey, Ralph E. Williamson 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers programs of study for 
the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Agricultural 
Engineering degrees. A bachelor's degree in Agricultural Engineering from 
an accredited curriculum or its equivalent entitles an individual to one of 
two approaches to graduate study. For those interested primarily in existing 
technologies, the Master of Agricultural Engineering program permits selec- 
tions from a variety of advanced technical courses. Such study is appropriate 
to certain supervisory and managerial positions, technical sales, service and 
promotional work. 

The Master of Science program takes into account the increasing rigor of 
modern engineering. Emphasis here is placed on mathematics and theory as 
the unifying link between otherwise widely divergent fields of knowledge, 
which are prerequisite to effective engineering advances in agricultural pro- 
ductions. As the student acquires competence in the advanced methods of 
science, he derives mathematical models for reduction of observational 
knowledge to engineering applications. 

Study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree builds on the above Master of 
Science program by an additional year of formal study followed by a period 
of independent research to satisfy dissertation requirements. 

Unusual opportunities are available for graduate student participation 
in departmental research programs. Current projects include: Animal Envir- 
onment; Watershed Hydrology, Drainage and Irrigation; Crop Processing and 
Materials Handling; Field Production Operations; Fruit and Vegetable 
Mechanization; Pesticide Applications; Human Engineering; Engineering 
Economy. The systems approach to operations in crop and animal produc- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 45 

tions provides a variety of areas within which to define timely investigations. 

Graduate students have access to a research shop which is manned by 
competent mechanics. 

Information concerning fellowships and assistantships in Agricultural 
Engineering may be obtained from the head of the department. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

AGE 411. Form Power and Machinery 3-3 

Prerequisite: AGE 211 

This course is designed to provide students in Agricultural Engineering 
Technology with a knowledge of the operations of manufacturing and dis- 
tributing organizations of farm machinery and their places in these organiza- 
tions. Included is a practical course in farm tractors and engines with 
emphasis on familiarizing the student with component parts— their applica- 
tions. Included is a practical course in farm tractors and engines with 
from the standpoint of power, performance and ratings. 

AGE 433. Crop Preservation and Processing 3-0 

Prerequisite: AGE 341 

This course defines the environmental requirements for preservation of 
crop quality as related to their physical and biochemical characteristics when 
harvested and during storage. The use of modern methods, equipment and 
engineering applications are exemplified in obtaining the required environ- 
ments needed in solving present farm problem situations. Theory will also 
be phased into practical applications of the latest methods for farm process- 
ing of grains, seeds and feeds. 

AGE 453. Bio-engineering Parameters 2-0 

Prerequisites: AGE 303, MA 301, AGE 352 

Physical properties and response characteristics of plant materials are 
studied in their relationship to engineering analysis for production, harvest- 
ing and processing operations. Topics include germination, growth dynamics, 
physical properties for harvesting and materials handling, biological response 
criteria, environmental effects, theory of curing and drying and quality 
evaluation. 

AGE 461. Analysis of Agricultural Production Systems 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 201, EC 205, ST 361 

This course is a survey of the basic methodology and techniques of opera- 
tions research and system analysis, particularly as they apply to Agricultural 
Engineering. The costs and productivity of farm equipment, reliability 
theory, time study techniques, work efficiency, activity network problems, de- 
cision theory, game theory, model formulation, algorithm formulation, simu- 
lation, computational procedures, and case studies of operations research in 
agriculture are all discussed. 

AGE 462. Functional Design of Field Machines 0-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 361, AGE 461, ME 301, SSC 200 

A study of the modern farm tractor and the design of field machines from a 

functional point of view. 



46 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

AGE 471. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, CE 201, ST 361 

A study is made of climate, runoff, infiltration, soil-water-plant relations and 
flow theory, as well as those processes that affect erosion. The above principles 
are applied to the study of engineering design practices in erosion control, 
drainage, irrigation and flood control. 

AGE 481. Design of Farmstead Engineering Systems 0-3 

Prerequisites: AGE 453, AGE 461, AGE 491 

Engineering principles will be combined with biological principles to de- 
velop a design procedure for non-field agricultural systems in which maximum 
profit can be obtained. The homeothermic mechanisms of animals will be 
used to indicate the influence of thermal environment upon animal growth 
and production. Techniques of labor efficiency and automation will be used 
in design. The technology of building design will be developed. Material 
selection and structural design for economic buildings will be indicated. 

AGE 491. Electrotechnology for Agricultural Production 3-0 

Prerequisite: EE 332 

A course in the application of electrical circuits, electronic circuits and elec- 
trostatics to problems in agricultural production systems. The practical as- 
spects of motor selection, wiring and electronic circuitry will be given in 
the laboratory. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

AGE 552. Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing 2-0 

Prerequisites: MA 301, EE 331 

Theory and application of primary sensors and tranducers. Utilization of 
electronic and solid state devices. Indicating, recording and control circuitry. 
Special circuitry for agricultural applications. Mr. Splinter. 

AGE 590. Special Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior in Agricultural Engineering or Graduate Standing 
Each student will select a subject on which he will do research and write 
a technical report on his results. He may choose a subject pertaining to his 
particular interest in any area of study in Agricultural Engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

AGE 654. Agricultural Process Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by Onsager's relations to 
provide a theoretical basis for analyzing the energetics of systems that include 
life processes. Mr. Johnson. 

AGE 661. Analysis of Function and Design of Farm Machinery 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 411 

Methods and tools used in determining the functional requirements of ma- 
chine components; writing of machine specifications in terms of fundamental 
parameters; introduction of the principles of discriminate and indiscriminate 
mechanical selection of agricultural products with emphasis on the theory 
of servo-systems. Mr. Bowen. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 47 

AGE 671. Theory of Drainage, Irrigation and Erosion Control 0-4 

Emphasis is placed on the physical and mathematical aspects of problems in 
conservation engineering and an attempt is made to rationalize procedures 
which have often come about through experience rather than through analy- 
tical considerations. Examples are presented of cases where such an analyti- 
cal approach has already improved, or shows promise of improving, design 
criteria and procedures. (Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) 

Mr. van Schilfgaarde. 

AGE 681. Analysis of Function and Design of Farm Buildings 4 or 4 

Prerequisite: AGE 481 

A study of the functional requirements of farm structures with respect to 
man, animals and crops and development of the means of providing struc- 
tures which fulfill the functional requirements. Application of the science 
and art of engineering in the solution of environmental problems. Advanced 
planning in the integration of structural environmental design. 

Mr. Jordan. 
AGE 695. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Elaboration of the subject areas, techniques and methods peculiar to pro- 
fessional interest through presentations of personal and published works; 
opportunity for students to present and defend, critically, ideas, concepts 
and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and analogies 
between problems in Agricultural Engineering and other technologies, and 
to present the relationship of Agricultural Engineering to the socioeconomic 
enterprise. Mr. Hassler. 

AGE 699. Research in Agricultural Engineering Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Agricultural Engineering 
A maximum of six credits is allowed toward a Master's degree; no limitation 
on credits for Doctorate program. 

Performance of a particular investigation of concern to Agricultural Engi- 
neering. The study will begin with the selection of a problem and culminate 
with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff. 

AGRICULTURE 

AG 401. Principles and Methods of Extension Education 0-3 

A study of the background, development, and operation of the Agricultural 
Extension Service. Consideration is given to major events leading to the 
establishment of Agricultural Extension, its objectives, organization, and 
philosophy. Major emphasis is placed upon the principles underlying Ex- 
tension education together with 'methods of program building and teaching. 

AG 503. The Programming Process in the Cooperative Extension 

Service and Related Organizations 0-3 

Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree 

The principles and processes involved in programming, including basic 
theories and concepts supporting the program process. Attention will be 
given to the general framework in which programming is done, the organiza- 
tion needed, and the program roles of both professional and lay leaders. 

Mr. Boone. 



48 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ira Deward Porterfield, Head, Elliott Roy Barrick, Edward 
Guy Batte, George Hyatt, Jr., James Giacomo Lecce, James Edward 
Legates, Gennard Matrone, W. Ray Murley, Frank Houston Smith, 
Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Samuel B. Tove, Lester Curtis Ulberg, 
George Herman Wise 

Associate Professors: Albert J. Clawson, Emmett Urcey Dillard, Lemuel 
Goode, Richard Douglas Mochrie, Harold Arch Ramsey, William 
Wesley Garry Smart, Jr., Milton B. Wise 

Assistant Professors: Edward Vitangelo Caruolo, Donald Gould Daven- 
port, James Murray Leatherwood, John Joseph McNeill, Allen Huff 
Rakes, Richard Monier Myers, Odis Wayne Robison 

Advanced studies leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy are offered in the Department of Animal Science. The grad- 
uate programs are presented in four subdivisions: Animal Breeding and 
Physiology, Animal and Dairy Husbandry, Animal Diseases, and Nutrition. 

Students specializing in animal breeding concentrate their efforts in solv- 
ing problems concerned with the efficient utilization of superior germ plasm. 
Further emphasis is provided in the areas of quantitative animal genetics 
and/or reproductive physiology. Herds and flocks of livestock, as well as 
small animals, are available near the campus. Environmental control cham- 
bers, surgery rooms, space for semen processing and storage are other off- 
campus facilities provided for studies in animal breeding. 

Students specializing in animal and dairy husbandry may select options in 
nutrition, physiology and management with beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep 
and swine. Animals of various types and breeds, which are available for 
research, are quartered on approximately 2,000 acres of land operated by the 
department. In addition, branch stations are located in all major geographic 
areas of North Carolina so that the research programs may be applied to the 
conditions existing throughout the State. 

Students studying animal diseases are offered specialized work in pathology, 
parasitology, veterinary bacteriology and virology, and other phases of ani- 
mal diseases. The Animal Disease Section is located in a modern animal 
disease laboratory building, which provides excellent facilities for research 
and teaching in the animal disease field. Included are large animal isolation 
units for work in the field of veterinary bacteriology and virology, para- 
sitology, physiology, and bacteriology research laboratories and a diagnostic 
laboratory, and necropsy room. 

Training offered to students in nutrition is focused on the fundamental 
aspects of the science of nutrition. In course programs the development of a 
strong foundation in the physical and the biological sciences is required. 
In research a wide choice of problems within current project areas, including 
microbial metabolism, energy metabolism, digestive mechanisms, and metabo- 
lism of micronutrients, lipids, proteins, and complex carbohydrates, are 
available. Animal and chemical laboratory facilities available and types of 
experiments conducted are such that graduate students in nutrition have the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 49 

opportunity to become familiar with principles and procedures employed in 
many different kinds of biological investigations ranging from micro studies 
of bacteria and of special components of animal cells to gross investigations 
of intact mammals. 

All sections of the Department of Animal Science, with the exception of 
Animal Disease, are housed in Polk Hall. Modern research laboratories ap- 
propriate for the various areas of investigation are located in this building. 
A large-animal facility, located adjacent to the campus, serves as an inter- 
mediary between the farms and the laboratories. At this research center, 
phases of the physiology and nutrition programs are conducted. 

The primary goal in all graduate programs in animal science is to provide 
the challenge and the opportunities for students to develop their ability to 
the degree that they can contribute creatively and continue to grow in their 
chosen profession. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ANS 404. Dairy Farm Problems 0-3 

Prerequisite: ANS 201 

Advanced study of practical dairy farm management including farm records, 

farm buildings, sanitation, roughage utilization and herd culling. 

ANS 406. Animal Science Seminar 0-1 

Review and discussion of special topics and the current literature pertain- 
ing to all phases of Animal Production. 

ANS 407. Advanced Livestock Production 0-4 

Prerequisites: GN 411, ANS 312 

A study of the economic, nutritional, genetic, physiological and managerial 
factors affecting the operation of commercial and purebred livestock enter- 
prises. 

ANS 408. Reproduction and Lactation 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

Anatomy of the reproductive organs and mammary glands with detailed 

coverage of the physiological processes involved and of factors controlling 

and influencing them. A special research problem selected by the student is 

required. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ANS 503. (GN 503) Genetic Improvement of Livestock 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411 or Consent of Instructor 

The application of genetic principles to the economic improvement of animal 
agriculture. Phenotypic and genetic relationships among economic traits as 
well as mode of inheritance and method of measurement of the traits. The 
role of inbreeding, outbreeding and selection methods in producing superior 
genetic populations. Mr. Robison. 

ANS 505. Diseases of Farm Animals 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 103 

The pathology of bacterial, viral, parasitic nutritional, thermal and mechani- 
cal diseases processes. Mr. Batte. 



50 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ANS 513. Needs and Utilization of Nutrients by Livestock 0-3 

Prerequisite: ANS 312 or Equivalent 

Measurement of nutrients needs of livestock and the nutrient values of feeds. 

Nutritive requirements for productive functions. Mr. Wise. 

ANS 590. Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 

Special problems may be selected or assigned in various phases of Animal 
Science. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ANS 602. (GN 602) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 512, GN 512 

A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, 

and alternative breeding plans. Mr. Legates. 

ANS 604. (ZO 604) Experimental Animal Physiology 4-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 513 or Equivalent 

A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in 

physiological investigation. Messrs. Ulberg, Wise. 

ANS 614. (BO 614) Bacterial Metabolism 0-2 

Prerequisites: BO 514 or Equivalent; CH 551 

The energy metabolism of bacteria; synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, pro- 
teins, purines, pyrimidines, and nucleic acids; bacterial photosynthesis; 
enzyme formation and metabolic control mechanisms. 

Mr. McNeill. 

ANS 621. (CH 621) Enzymes and Intermediary Metabolism 4-0 

Prerequisites: CH 551 and Permission of Instructor 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary 
metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, fatty acids, vitamins, and porphyrins; 
metabolic energy relationships. Mr. Tove. 

ANS 622. (CH 622 and ST 622) Principles of Biological Assays 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 551, ST 512 

Techniques and designs of biological assays. The interrelationship of logical 

principles, designs, and analyses is emphasized. 

Mr. Smart. 

ANS 653. (CH 653) Mineral Metabolism 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Principles of mineral metabolism, with emphasis on metabolic functions, re- 
action mechanisms and interrelationships. Mr. Matrone. 

ANS 690. Seminar in Animal Nutrition 1-1 

Prerequisite: Permission of Seminar Leaders 

Orientation in philosophy of research, preparation for research and general 

research methodology. Graduate Staff. 

ANS 699. Research in Animal Science Credits by Arrangement 

A maximum of six hours is allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation 
on credits in doctorate programs. Graduate Staff. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

BS 531. (See ST 531, Biomathematics I.) 
BS 532. (See ST 532, Biomathematics II.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 51 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Glenn Ray Noggle, Head, Donald Benton Anderson, Earnest 

A. Ball, James Brainerd Evans, * Herbert Temple Scofield, Larry 

Alston Whitford 
Visiting Professor: George John Schumacher 
Professor Emeritus: Bertram Whittier Wells 
Associate Professors: Ernest Oscar Beal, Arthur W. Cooper, Gerald H. 

Elkan, James W. Hardin, Jerome J. Perry, James Richard Troyer 
Assistant Professors: Walter J. Dobrogosz, Joseph S. Kahn, Heinz Seltmann, 

Ralph E. Williamson 

Members of the Microbiology Faculty 

Professors: William Victor Bartholomew, John Lincoln Etchells, James 
Brainerd Evans, James Giacomo Lecce, Marvin Luther Speck 

Associate Professor: Gerald H. Elkan 

Assistant Professors: Frank B. Armstrong, Walter J. Dobrogosz, John 
Joseph McNeill 

The Department of Botany and Bacteriology offers programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in either Botany or 
Bacteriology. A wide range of areas of specialization is available within each 
of these programs. 

Students majoring in Botany may select research problems in plant physi- 
ology, ecology, anatomy, morphology, phycology and systematic botany. 

Students majoring in Bacteriology may select research problems in micro- 
bial physiology, metabolism or genetics, food microbiology or soil micro- 
biology. 

Adequate physical facilities and equipment are available for teaching and 
research in all phases of the department's program. Outstanding are the 
laboratory, growth chamber, and greenhouse facilities for research in bac- 
teriology, morphology and anatomy, and physiology. The use of radioisotopes 
in physiological, phychological, and morphological research is supported by 
adequate facilities. A fine herbarium supports study in systematics and 
ecology. The availability in the State of a wide range of habitats with an 
accompanying diversity of flora provides opportunities for numerous research 
problems in ecology, phycology, and systematics. 

Graduate students terminating their work at the master's level have a 
somewhat limited opportunity as professional botanists or bacteriologists. 
State, Federal and industrial employment is available as well as academic 
positions in some colleges and secondary schools. Holders of the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree will find opportunities for academic positions in colleges 
and universities, for research positions in Federal and State Experiment 
Stations, and for research and development work with private industrial or 
research institutions. 

* On Leave 



5 2 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

BO 403. Systematic Botany 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or BS 100 

A systematic survey of vascular plants emphasizing field identification, termi- 
nology, and general evolutionary relationships. 

BO 412. General Bacteriology 4-0 

Prerequisites: CH 107 or CH 103, CH 221 or CH 220 Recommend But Not 

Required 

An advanced biology course dealing with bacteria and other microorganisms, 
their structure, development, and function. Emphasis is placed on the funda- 
mental concepts and techniques in microbiology such as isolation, cultivation, 
observation, morphology, and the physiology and nutrition of bacteria. The 
applications of microbiology, the role of microbes in nature, and their role 
in infection and immunity are considered. 

BO 421. Plant Physiology 4-4 

Prerequisites: BO 103 or BS 100, 2 Courses in Chemistry 
An introductory treatment of the chemical and physical processes occurring 
in higher green plants with emphasis upon the mechanisms, factors affecting, 
correlations between processes, and biological significance. 

BO 441. Plant Ecology -0 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or BS 100 

An introduction to the study of plants in relation to their environment. 
Major topics considered are: factors of the environment; the structure, 
analysis, and dynamics of plant communities; past and present distribution 
of vegetation types. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BO 505. (See FS 505. Food Microbiology.) 

BO 506. (See FS 506. Advanced Food Microbiology.) 

BO 511. Advanced Bacteriology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

This course will present the principles and techniques of isolation and char- 
acterization of bacteria from a wide range of habitats. Particular stress will 
be given to the principles of enrichment techniques, differential and selective 
media, and pertinent diagnostic tests that are applicable to particular groups 
of bacteria. Messrs. Evans, Elkan. 

BO 512. Morphology of Vascular Plants 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or BS 100 

A study of comparative morphology, ontogeny and evolution of the vascular 
plants. Emphasis is placed upon the phylogeny of sexual reproduction and of 
the vascular systems. Mr. Ball. 

BO 513. Plant Anatomy 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or BS 100 

A study of the anatomy of the Angiosperms and Gymnosperms. The develop- 
ment of tissues is traced from their origin by meristems to their mature 
states. Mr. Ball. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 53 

BO 514. Introductory Bacterial Physiology 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 412, CH 221 or 220; CH 551 (May Be Taken Concur- 
rently.) 

Emphasis will be placed on general principles and function with respect to 
the living cell. Included will be a study of cell structure, growth, death, 
reproduction, nutrition, and metabolism. An attempt will be made to 
illustrate the application of basic principles to applied areas of bacteriology 
and to other areas of basic science. 

Messrs. Dobrogosz, Evans. 

BO 521. Systematic Botany of Monocot Families 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of monocot families. 
Special emphasis is given to terminology, morphology, identification and 
relationships. (Offered in 1965-66 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Beal. 

BO 523, Systematic Botany of Dicot Families 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 403 

A comprehensive survey of the systematics and evolution of dicot families. 
Special emphasis is given to terminology, morphology, identification, and 
relationships. (Offered in 1965-66 and alternate years.) Mr. Hardin. 

BO 531. (See SSC 532. Soil Microbiology.) 

BO 534. Physiology of Plant Cells 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 421 or Equivalent; Advanced Preparation in Chemistry or 
Physics May Be Substituted With the Permission of the Instructor 
An advanced treatment of basic plant processes at the cellular level with 
emphasis on theoretical principles. Mr. Troyer. 

BO 535. Water, Solute and Gas Relations of Plants 0-2 

Prerequisite: BO 534 

An advanced treatment of processes of higher plants involving exchange of 
materials between the plant and its surroundings and movement of materials 
within the plant. Theoretical principles are emphasized. (Offered in 1964-65 
and alternate years.) Mr. Troyer. 

BO 536. Growth and Development of Plants 0-2 

Prerequisite: BO 534 

An advanced treatment of the physiology of growth and development of 
higher plants, with emphasis on theoretical principles. (Offered in 1965-66 
and alternate years.) Mr. Troyer. 

BO 544. Plant Geography 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 403, 441, GN 411, or Equivalents 

A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data 
from the fields of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany, and taxonomy. 
The course will include a survey of the present distribution of major vegeta- 
tion types throughout the world, a discussion of the history and development 
of this present pattern of vegetation, and a discussion of the principles and 
theories of plant geography. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Cooper. 

BO 545. Advanced Plant Ecology 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 421, 441 or Equivalents 

An advanced consideration, through class discussions and individual projects, 



54 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

of the principles, theories and methods of plant ecology. (Offered in 1965-66 
and alternate years.) Mr. Cooper. 

BO 561. (See GN 561. Biochemical and Microbial Genetics.) 

BO 570. Sanitary Microbiology 3-0 

Prerequisite: BO 412 or Consent of Instructor 

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are presented and 
related to problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treat- 
ment. Laboratory exercises present basic microbiological techniques and 
illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects 
of waste disposal. Mr. Elkan. 

BO 574. Phycology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or Equivalent 

An introduction to the structure, reproduction and importance of the 
classes of organisms which may be included in the algae. Considerable time 
is devoted to the local fresh-water and marine floras and the ecology of im- 
portant species. Mr. Whitford. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

BO 614. (See ANS 614. Bacterial Metabolism.) 

BO 620. Advanced Taxonomy 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 521, 523 or Permission of Instructor 

A course in the principles of plant taxonomy including the history of 
taxonomy, systems of classification, rules of nomenclature, taxonomic litera- 
ture, taxonomic and biosystematic methods, and monographic techniques. 

Mr. Hardin. 

BO 635. The Mineral Nutrition of Plants 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 521, 523 or Permission of Instructor 

Discussion of diffusion, molecular specificity and energetics of active trans- 
port. The physical chemistry of the essential elements and its significance 
to their biochemical functions. Mr. Kahn. 

BO 636. Discussions in Plant Physiology 0-1 

Prerequisite: BO 534 

Group discussions at an advanced level of selected topics of current interest 

in plant physiology. Mr. Troyer. 

BO 690. Bacteriology Seminar 1-1 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of in- 
terest to bacteriologists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit 
allowed if one paper per semester is presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff. 

BO 691. Botany Seminar 1-1 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of in- 
terest to botanists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate student credit is 
allowed if one paper per semester is presented at seminar. 

Graduate Staff. 

BO 692. Special Problems in Bacteriology Credits by Arrangement 

Directed research in some specialized phase of bacteriology other than a 
thesis problem but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 55 

BO 693. Special Problems in Botany Credits by Arrangement 

Directed research in some specialized phase of botany other than a thesis 
problem but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff. 

BO 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Original research preparatory to writing a master's thesis or a Ph.D. disserta- 
tion. Graduate Staff. 



CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

(See Department of Mineral Industries) 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Edward Martin Schoenborn, Head, Richard Bright, James K. 

Ferrell, Kenneth Orion Beatty, Jr. 
Associate Professors: David Boyd Marsland, Frances Marian Richardson, 

John Frank Seely 
Assistant Professor: Edward Paul Stahel 

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers programs of advanced 
study and research leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. The Chemical Engineering faculty seeks to provide a close associa- 
tion between faculty and students, to promote a common interest in advanced 
professional study, and to encourage intensive investigation, and top-level 
creative activity. 

Graduate work in Chemical Engineering is of increasing importance since 
it enables the student to attain a higher degree of specialized professional 
competence and at the same time to secure greater mastery of the sciences 
which underlie the quantitative aspects of chemical technology. The demand 
for chemical engineers with advanced training is greater now than at any 
time since the beginning of the chemical industry. 

Students having had one or more years of training beyond the bac- 
calaureate are especially needed for fundamental and applied research, for 
process development and design, for production, and even for management, 
technical services and sales. Private consulting work and careers in teaching 
usually demand a period of advanced study well beyond the normal four- 
year undergraduate program. 

At present, major emphasis in the department is concerned with basic 
studies of unit operations such as fluid flow, heat transfer at high and low 
temperatures, distillation, solvent extraction, etc., with thermodynamics, 
reaction kinetics, phase equalibria, plastics technology, process measurement 
and control, and many other aspects of chemical technology. The varied in- 
terests of an exceptionally well-qualified staff can provide guidance for ad- 
vanced study in any phase of chemical engineering. Strong supporting pro- 
grams of work are also available in mathematics, statistics, physics, chemistry, 
nuclear engineering, metallurgy, the life sciences, textiles, and other fields of 
engineering. 



56 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Chemical Engineering occupies the four-story east 
wing of the Riddick Engineering Laboratories building. Modern, well- 
equipped laboratories are provided with all necessary services for both teach- 
ing and research. A wide variety of special facilities such as X-ray equipment, 
spectrophotometers, electron microscope, electro-mechanical testing machine, 
electronic controllers and recorders, etc., are available for graduate research. 

In cooperation with the Department of Engineering Research, members of 
the Chemical Engineering staff conduct a number of important research 
projects which are supported by industry, and by State and governmental 
agencies. Graduate students assisting on these projects not only acquire 
financial assistance but gain valuable research experience on problems of 
current interest. 

In addition to research assistantships, the department also offers each 
year a limited number of graduate assistantships for part-time work in the 
department. These may be for teaching, laboratory preparation, etc., or for 
research, as the needs arise. Appointments are for one academic year of 
nine months for half-time work and at the present carry a stipend of $2,400. 
They are renewable upon evidence of satisfactory performance. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 421, CHE 422. Reactor Energy Transfer 3-3 

Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208 

Thermodynamics, heat transfer and fluid flow with emphasis on the problems 

and methods used in the design and analysis of nuclear reactors. 

CHE 425. Process Measurement and Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: CHE 312 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Theory and application of methods for measuring, recording, transmitting 

and controlling process variables. The techniques of analysis, beginning with 

process elements in automatic control and proceeding through system 

analysis, are employed. Commercial instruments are available for simulating 

industrial control problems. 

CHE 427, CHE 428. Separation Processes I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

A study of the principles underlying such unit operations as absorption, 

extraction, distillation, drying, filtration, etc., with emphasis on procedures 

and economic considerations. 

CHE 431. Chemical Engineering Laboratory I 0-2 

Prerequisite: CHE 311 

Required of Juniors in Chemical Engineering 

Laboratory work on typical apparatus involving unit operations. Experi- 
ments are designed to augment the theory and data of lecture courses and 
to develop proficiency in the writing of technical reports. 

CHE 432, CHE 433. Chemical Engineering Laboratory II, III 2-2 

Prerequisites: CHE 312, CHE 431 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

A continuation of CHE 431. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 57 

CHE 446. Chemical Process Kinetics 3-0 

Prerequisite: CHE 315 

Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

A basic study of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions, and of 

catalysis. 

CHE 460. Seminar 1-1 

One Semester Required of Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Professional aspects of chemical engineering; topics of current interest in 

chemical engineering. 

CHE 470. Chemical Engineering Projects 2-2 

(By Arrangement) 

Elective for Seniors in Chemical Engineering 

Introduction to research through experimental, theoretical and literature 
studies of chemical engineering problems. Oral and written presentation of 
reports. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 511. Problem Analysis for Chemical Engineers 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 428, MA 301 

The application of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation 
and solution of problems in transport phenomena, transient phenomena in 
unit operations, process dynamics, and thermodynamics. Study and use of 
analog computer solutions of these problems. 

Mr. Ferrell. 

CHE 513. Thermodynamics I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 315 or Equivalent 

An intermediate course in thermodynamic principles and their application to 
chemical and phase equilibria. The course is largely from a macroscopic 
viewpoint but consideration will be given to some aspects of the statistical 
viewpoint. Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 515. Transport Phenomena 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 312 

A theoretical study of transport of momentum, energy, and matter with 
emphasis on the latter two. The diffusional operations, including coupled 
heat and mass transfer, are introduced in the light of the theory. 

Mr. Marsland. 

CHE 517. Kinetics and Catalysis 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 446 

An intensive study of homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic reactions. 
Emphasis will be placed on fundamental approaches, experimental methods, 
and mathematical techniques in engineering analysis of chemical reaction 
systems. Mr. Stahel. 

CHE 540. Electrochemical Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry 

The application of electrochemical principles to such topics as electrolysis, 

electroanalysis, electroplating, metal refining, etc. 

Mr. Schoenborn. 



58 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CHE 541. Cellulose Industries 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion 
products. Emphasis placed on recent developments in the field of synthetic 
fibers, films, lacquers, and other cellulose compounds. 

Mr. Seely. 

CHE 543. Technology of Plastics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry 

The properties, methods of manufacture, and applications of synthetic resins. 

Recent developments in the field are stressed. 

Mr. Seely. 

CHE 551. Thermal Problems in Nuclear Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 or ME 303; or CHE 311; or Equivalent 
The design and operation of nuclear reactors and the utilization of the 
power from them involves major problems in nearly every phase of heat 
transfer, and many important problems in fluid flow. Possible solutions to 
these problems are severely affected by the influences of radiation on heat 
transfer media, hazards of handling radioactive substances, etc. The course 
considers the thermal problems of nuclear reactor design and the principles 
of fluid flow and heat transfer necessary to their solutions. The course is 
intended for engineers and science students with backgrounds in physics 
and mathematics and elementary thermodynamics. Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 597. Chemical Engineering Projects 1 to 3 Credits 

Prerequisite or Concurrent: CHE 412 

A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied field. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CHE 610. Heat Transfer 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 515 

An advanced course dealing primarily with heat transfer between liquids 
and solids, optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, con- 
duction, heating and cooling of solids, radiant heat transmission. 

Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 621. Mass-Transfer Operations 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 515 

An application of transport theory and empirical devices to the analysis, 
synthesis and design of mass-transfer equipment. The operations of absorp- 
tion, extraction, distillation, humidification, drying, etc., will be considered. 

Mr. Marsland. 

CHE 622. Chemical Reaction Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 517 

An advanced study of ideal and real reactor systems. The approach em- 
ployed is twofold: 1. Characterization of actual systems by empirical rate 
expressions coupled with fundamental analysis; 2. Simulation of coupled 
physical and chemical processes in a reactor by solution of various types 
of physical models. Mr. Stahel. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 59 

CHE 623. Fluid and Particle Dynamics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 515 

The principles of fluid dynamics and their application to laminar and tur- 
bulent flow, flow in closed channels, flow in packed beds and porous media, 
particle technology, industrial rheology, and two-phase flow. 

Mr. Ferrell. 

CHE 624. Process Dynamics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 511 

A detailed study of the dynamic response of typical chemical process equip- 
ment including instrumentation arid process control devices. Fundamental 
concepts of automatic control of process variables such as temperature, 
pressure flow, liquid level, etc. Mr. Ferrell. 

CHE 625. Thermodynamics II 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 513 

A consideration of various thermodynamic topics of special interest to 
chemical engineers. The effects of high pressures and high temperatures on 
equilibria, relationship of thermodynamics to rate process, thermodynamics 
of the steady state including coupled transfer process, and experimental 
methods in thermodynamics would be typical. 

Mr. Beatty. 

CHE 631. Chemical Process Design 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CHE 428 

Design and selection of process equipment, through solution of comprehen- 
sive problems involving unit operations, kinetics, thermodynamics, strength 
of materials and chemistry. 

Graduate Staff. 

CHE 690. Readings in Chemical Engineering Credits by Arrangement 

A comprehensive survey of the literature in a specified area, and an exhaus- 
tive survey on a chosen topic within that area, under the direct guidance of 
the thesis adviser. This course has the goals of (a) mature selection of a 
research topic, and (b) preparation for a research proposal in fullest possible 
detail. 

Graduate Staff. 

CHE 693. Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering 1 to 3 Credits 

(Per Semester) 

A study of recent development in chemical engineering theory and practice, 
such as ion exchange, crystallization, mixing, molecular distillation, hydro- 
genation, fluorination, etc. The topic will vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff. 

CHE 695. Seminar 1-1 

Literature investigations and reports of special topics in chemical engineer- 
ing and allied fields. 

Graduate Staff. 

CHE 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Independent investigation of an advanced chemical engineering problem. 
A report of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 



60 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ralph Clay Swann, Head, David Marshall Cates*, George 
Osmore Doak, Richard Henry Loeppert, Gennard Matrone*, Walter 
John Peterson, Willis Alton Reid, Cowin Cook Robinson, Henry Ames 
Rutherford*, Alfred J. Stamm*, Paul Porter Sutton, Samuel B. Tove*, 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew* 

Adjunct Professor: Monroe Eliot Wall 

Associate Professors: Carl Lee Bumgardner, Alonzo Freeman Coots, Leon 
David Freedman, Forrest William Getzen, Louis Allman Jones, Richard 
Coleman Pinkerton, Raymond Cyrus White 

Assistant Professors: Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, George Gilbert Long, 
Edward Carroll Sisler, William Preston Tucker 

The Department of Chemistry offers the degree of Master of Science in 
Chemistry. Instruction is available in all major areas of chemistry. 

Before the master's program is initiated, a student must have met the re- 
quirements set forth by the Committee on Professional Training of the 
American Chemical Society for the baccalaureate degree, either at the insti- 
tution in which he received his undergraduate training or at North Carolina 
State. The minimum course requirements in chemistry for the bachelor's 
degree consist of four basic year courses in general, analytical, physical, 
and organic chemistry, plus one semester of inorganic chemistry and at 
least two advanced courses. The equivalent of two years of college mathe- 
matics, including at least one year of differential and integral calculus and 
one semester of differential equations, is required. 

Graduates are eligible for positions in industry, educational institutions 
or in research laboratories. Many graduates with the Master of Science de- 
gree have continued their education toward the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree with a major in one of the branches of chemistry. 

The Department of Chemistry is equipped with standard instruments and 
apparatus for both teaching and research. Many items of specialized equip- 
ment are available. Such equipment includes Geiger counters, a gamma 
spectrometer, proportional counters, a neutron source, a double grating 
infrared spectrometer, an ultraviolet-visible-near infrared absorption 
spectrophotometer, a grating emission spectrograph, a photofluorimeter, a 
coulometer, controlled potential electrodeposition apparatus, polarographs, 
conductivity bridges, oscillometers, high pressure reactors, a precision re- 
fractometer, polarimeters, fractionating columns, controlled atmosphere 
boxes, etc. 

A shop equipped with standard power tools (drill press, lathes, band 
saws, etc.) is available to research workers for construction of special appara- 
tus. Glass-blowing facilities are also available. 

Areas of research specialization include kinetics of gas phase reactions; 
problems in electrochemistry; distribution and structure of the flavin en- 
zymes; charged-particle cross-section measurements; application of radio- 
tracer techniques to physical chemistry problems; research in fission product 

* Affiliated Graduate Faculty member. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 61 

analysis, neutron activation and nuclear thermodynamics; synthesis and 
properties of organophosphorus and organoarsenic compounds; structure of 
organometallic compounds; kinetics of inorganic reactions; relation of 
chemical structure to herbicidal properties; problems in infrared and ultra- 
violet spectroscopy; problems in solid state chemistry; mechanisms involved 
in plant physiological processes; techniques of spectrographic analysis and 
their application in research with plants, soils, and animals. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 411. Analytical Chemistry I 4-4 

Prerequisites: CH 431, CH 432 

Corequisites: CH 433, CH 434 

An introduction to analytical chemistry, including both classical and modern 

techniques involving the distribution of a component between phases. 

Gravimetric methods, gas chromatography and adsorption techniques are 

included. 

CH 413. Analytical Chemistry II 4-0 

Prerequisite: CH 411 

A continuation of Analytical Chemistry I with emphasis upon modern 
approaches to acid-base chemistry, oxidation-reduction, potentiometric 
methods, and spectrophotometry. 

CH 420. Organic Preparations 0-3 

Prerequisites: Three Years Chemistry Including CH 223 

Experiments selected to acquaint the student with advanced methods and 

techniques in the preparation of organic substances. 

CH 431. Physical Chemistry I 3-3 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202, PY 207 

On intensive study of the states of matter, solutions, colloids, homogeneous 
and heterogeneous equilibrium, reaction kinetics, electrolysis, conductance, 
oxidation reactions, and ionic equilibrium. 

CH 432. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1-0 

Corequisite: CH 431 

Laboratory courses to accompany lecture work in Physical Chemistry I. 

CH 433. Physical Chemistry II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CH 431 

A continuation of CH 431. 

CH 434. Physical Chemistry Laboratory 0-1 

Corequisite: CH 433 

Laboratory course to accompany lecture work in Physical Chemistry II. 

CH 435. Physical Chemistry III 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

An intensive study of the structure of atoms and molecules, an introduction 

to statistics, and selected topics in modern physical chemistry. 

CH 441. Colloid Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 220, CH 215 

Adsorption, preparation, properties, constitution, stability and application 

of sols, gels, emulsions, foams, and aerosols; dialysis; Donnan membrane 

equilibrium. 



6 2 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CH 491. Reading in Honors Chemistry Credits by Arrangement 

A reading course for exceptionally able students at the senior level. The 
students will do extensive reading in areas of advanced chemistry and will 
present written reports of their findings. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 501. Inorganic Chemistry I 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Modern inorganic chemistry from the point of view of the chemical bond. 
Topics covered include chemical periodicity and its origins in atomic struc- 
ture; the ionic bond and electronegativity; crystal structure and bonding in 
ionic solids; the metallic state, conduction and semiconductors; the prepara- 
tion and properties of illustrative compounds. Mr. Pinkerton. 

CH 503. Inorganic Chemistry II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 501 

A continuation of CH 501. Topics covered include the hydrogen molecule- 
ion and the theory of the covalent bond; molecular orbitals and hybridiza- 
tion; dipole moments and magnetic properties; the theory of acids and 
bases; nonaqueous solvents; co-ordination compounds, carbonyls and quasi- 
aromatic compounds; and the chemistry of the transition metals, lanthanides 
and actinides. Mr. Long. 

CH 511. Chemical Spectroscopy 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Theory, analytical applications and interpretation of spectra as applied to 
chemical problems. Major emphasis will be placed upon ultraviolet, visible 
and infrared spectra. Mr. Long. 

CH 512. (TC 512) Chemistry of High Polymers 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 431 

Principles of condensation and free radical polymerization; kinetics and 
molecular weight distribution; copolymerization and composition; emulsion 
polymerization; structure. Mr. Cates. 

CH 513. Electroanalytical Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 413 

A course in electroanalytical chemistry including the foundations of theore- 
tical electrochemistry. Topics covered include potentiometric measure- 
ments and electrical resistance; diffusion and transport; theory of dilute solu- 
tions; polarography and amperometric measurements; surface effects and 
electrode kinetics; electrochemistry in non-aqueous systems. 

Mr. Pinkerton. 

CH 521. Advanced Organic Chemistry I 3-0 

Prerequisites: Three Years Chemistry Including CH 223 

Resonance; reaction mechanisms; hydrocarbons, organic halides, alcohols, 

amines, and carbonyl compounds. Mr. Doak. 

CH 523. Advanced Organic Chemistry II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 521 

Stereochemistry of organic compounds, including steroids and other natural 

products. Mr. Doak. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 63 

CH 525. Physical Organic Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 223, CH 433 

Theoretical and physical aspects of organic chemistry; structure and mechan- 
ism in organic chemistry. Mr. Loeppert. 

CH 527. Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds 3-0 

Prerequisites: Three Years Chemistry Including CH 223 
A study of the preparation, properties and reactions of compounds con- 
taining the carbon-metal bond, with a brief description of their uses. 

Mr. Doak. 

CH 528. Qualitative Organic Analysis 4-0 

Prerequisites: Three Years Chemistry Including CH 223 

A study of functional groups; separation and identification of compounds; 

preparation of derivatives. Mr. Doak. 

CH 531. Chemical Thermodynamics 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An extension of elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real 
gases, ideal solutions, electrolytic solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems, 
and irreversible processes. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics and 
the estimation of thermodynamic functions from spectroscopic data. (Offered 
in alternate years.) Mr. Sutton. 

CH 533. Chemical Kinetics 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An intensive survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis 
on experimental and mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic 
theory, and theory of the transition state. Applications to gas reactions, 
reactions in solution, and mechanism studies. (Offered in alternate years.) 

Mr. Bowen. 

CH 535. Surface Phenomena 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301 

An intensive survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. 
This course is designed to cover the foundations of the present understand- 
ing of surface behavior. Formulation of basic theories are presented together 
with illustrations of their current applications. (Offered in alternate years.) 

Mr. Getzen. 

CH 537. Quantum Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 435, PY 401, PY 407 

The elements of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and 
time-dependent phenomena. Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, 
particularly chemical bonds. (Offered in alternate years.) 

Mr. Coots. 

CH 543. Radioisotope Principles 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 433, PY 207, MA 202 

A presentation of the basic knowledge of radioactivity, nuclear reactions, 
ionizing radiations, and radiochemistry essential to competence in the use 
of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots. 

CH 544. Radioisotope Techniques 1-0 

Corequisite: CH 543 

A laboratory course in the physical and chemical techniques essential to 

competence in the use of radioisotopes. Mr. Coots. 



64 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CH 545. Rodiochemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 543 or PY 407, PY 410 

An advanced presentation of the applications of radioactivity to chemistry 
and of the applications of chemistry to the radioactive elements, particularly 
the heavy elements and fission products. Mr. Coots. 

CH 546. Rodiochemistry Laboratory 0-1 

Corequisite: CH 545 

The laboratory work associated with CH 545 Radiochemistry. 

Mr. Coots. 

CH 551. General Biological Chemistry 3-3 

Prerequisites: Three Years Chemistry Including CH 223 

The chemical constitution of living matter. Biochemical processes as well 

as compounds are studied. Mr. Peterson. 

CH 552. General Biological Chemistry Laboratory 2-2 

Corequisite: CH 551 

Laboratory course to accompany lecture work in General Biological Chemis- 
try . Graduate Staff. 

CH 553. Chemistry of Proteins and Nucleic Acids 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition, distribution, structure, properties and metabolism of amino 

acids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Graduate Staff. 

CH 555. Plant Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Composition of plants; properties, nature, and classification of plant con- 
stituents; changes occurring during growth, ripening and storage of plant 
products. Mr. Sisler. 

CH 561. (TC 561) Chemistry of Fibers 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 223 

The theory of fiber structure; the relationship between chemical structure 
and physical properties of natural and man-made fibers; the nature of the 
chemical reactions which produce degradation of fibers; the production of 
man-made fibers. Mr. Rutherford. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

CH 621. (ANS 621) Enzymes and Intermediary Metabolism 4-0 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

A study of the properties of enzymes and enzyme action; intermediary 
metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, purines and 
porphyrins; metabolic energy relationships. Mr. Tove. 

CH 653. (ANS 653) Mineral Metabolism 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 551 

Principles of mineral metabolism, with emphasis on metabolic functions, 
reaction mechanisms, and interrelationships. Mr. Matrone. 

CH 671. Advanced Physical Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 533 

A thorough review of the fundamental principles of physical chemistry 
with extension and application of these to the study of solid state. 

Mr. Sutton. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 65 

CH 672. Advanced Physical Chemistry 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 671 

The elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory, in terms of which 
certain topics from CH 671 will be more exhaustively developed. 

Mr. Sutton. 

CH 691. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Chemistry 
Required of graduate students with a major in Chemistry. 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of 
interest to chemists are reviewed and discussed. A maximum of two semes- 
ter credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward 
the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

CH 695. Special Topics in Chemistry Maximum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Forty Semester Credits in Chemistry 

Critical study of some special problems in one of the branches of Chemistry. 

Graduate Staff. 

CH 699. Chemical Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Forty Semester Credits in Chemistry 

Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of six 
semester credits is allowed toward a master's degree; there is no limitation 
on credits in doctorate programs. Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Charles Raymond Bramer, Acting Head, Ralph Eigil Fadum, 
Charles Russell McCullough, Carroll Lamb Mann, Jr., Charles 
Smallwood, Jr., Graduate Administrator, Mehemet Ensar Uyanik 

Associate Professors: Richard Hugh Bigelow, Paul Day Cribbins, John 
William Horn, Harvey Edward Wahls, Paul Zung Teh Zia 

Assistant Professors: Michael Amein, John Frederick Ely, Charles Page 
Fisher, Donald McDonald 

Visiting Lecturer: AbdelAziz Ismail Kashef 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study leading to 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate course work 
is available in the fields of sanitary engineering, soil mechanics and founda- 
tion engineering, structural engineering, and transportation engineering. 
Whereas the Master of Science program would normally include course 
work in only one of these specialty fields, a program of study leading to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree would encompass course work in a related 
combination of these fields. 

Laboratory facilities for sanitary engineering research work include an 
hydraulics laboratory, a chemical laboratory, and a biological laboratory. 

For work in soil mechanics and foundation engineering, a fully-equipped 
laboratory with modern soil-testing equipment is available. 

Facilities for structural engineering research include a well-equipped 
physical testing laboratory, an air-controlled structural models laboratory, 
and a special laboratory for testing large models or full-scale structures. 



66 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Transportation engineering facilities are a bituminous laboratory, an 
airphoto interpretation laboratory, a photogrammetry laboratory, and a 
traffic engineering laboratory provided with traffic control devices. 

In addition to these facilities, equipment for research is made available 
by the Department of Engineering Research. 

Some unique opportunities for research are offered the graduate students 
in Civil Engineering by reason of the location of North Carolina State in 
the State's Capital City. There are a number of cooperative research 
endeavors with municipal and State governmental agencies that provide 
funds for research assistantships. 

The resources of the institution also provide unique opportunities for 
combining studies in Civil Engineering with studies in other related fields. 

The broad nature of water resources problems has been recognized by 
the creation of a "Water Resources Institute" under the joint direction of 
the Deans of the Graduate School, the School of Engineering and the School 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Students in the major disciplines are urged 
to select one of the many aspects of the control, conservation and manage- 
ment of this resource as a topic for study and research. 

In recognition of the need by industry for personnel with training in 
water supply and the abatement of water pollution, the Civil Engineering 
Department suggests that students in the many curricula leading to positions 
in industry (food processing, textile chemistry, pulp and paper technology, 
chemical engineering, zoology and others) consider courses of instruction in 
sanitary engineering for minor sequences for advanced degrees. Among the 
courses appropriate for such students are the following: CE 484, Water 
Resources Engineering II; CE 571, Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment; 
CE 573, Analysis of Water and Sewage; CE 673, Industrial Water Supply 
and Waste Disposal; and CE 674, Stream Sanitation. 

There exists a growing need for the coordination of transportation facili- 
ties and land planning and for individuals with competence in both fields. 
To fulfill this need, an advanced program leading to a post-baccalaureate 
degree in engineering, majoring in transportation engineering, and to the 
degree of Master of Regional Engineering is offered through the combined 
resources of the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State 
and the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Qualified students have the opportunity to 
schedule their courses in instruction to enable them to qualify for both 
advanced degrees. 

The program is designed for students who are desirous of becoming 
technically proficient in both the fields of transportation engineering and 
city and regional planning. The minimum residence requirements include 
two academic years plus a summer internship. The curriculum includes the 
major core courses for both the advanced transportation engineering pro- 
gram and the city and regional planning program, plus supplementary 
courses important to both endeavors and a thesis. A bachelor's degree in 
engineering, including a knowledge of transportation engineering, from an 
institution of recognized standing is required for admission to the program. 
Applicants who do not meet these requirements in full may submit their 
credentials for examination and consideration. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 67 

Further information concerning the joint program may be obtained from 
the Department of Civil Engineering at North Carolina State in Raleigh or 
from the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of 
North Carolina in Chapel Hill. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 405, CE 406. Transportation Engineering I, II 4-4 

Prerequisites: CE 201, CE 331, CE 342 
Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering 

An integrated approach to the planning, design and operation of transpor- 
tation systems. Engineering and economic aspects of the basic transport 
modes, including highway, rail, water and air facilities, are investigated from 
the viewpoint of the civil engineer. 

CE 421. Structural Design I 3-0 

Prerequisites: CE 324, EM 301 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering and Civil Engineering Construc- 
tion Option 

Basic design concepts. Analysis and design of tension, compression and 
flexural members in metal. Behavior and design of connections— riveted, 
bolted and welded. Term project in design of mill-building bent. 

CE 422. Structural Design II 0-3 

Prerequisites: CE 421, CE 425 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering 

Analysis and design, in reinforced concrete, of beams in flexure, diagonal 

tension, bond and anchorage; axially loaded columns, eccentrically loaded 

columns, footings, retaining walls, continuous beams and one-way slabs. 

Introduction to ultimate strength design. Term project in design of a 

multi-story building frame in reinforced concrete. 

CE 425. Structural Analysis II 3-0 

Prerequisites: CE 324, EM 301 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering 

Deflection of beams and trusses; indeterminate stress analysis by moment 

area, slope deflection and moment distribution. 

CE 429. Structural Design III 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 421 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Analysis and design of reinforced concrete beams, columns, footings and 

retaining walls. Design of timber beams, columns and connections. Term 

project in planning and making structural design for the timber forming 

needed for a reinforced concrete building. 

CE 443. Foundations 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 421 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Identification and classification of soils; geological aspects of foundation 
engineering; methods of investigating subsoil conditions; control of water; 
types of foundations and conditions favoring their use; legal aspects of 
foundation engineering. 



68 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 461. Project Planning and Control I 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 362 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 
Analysis of construction plant layout requirements and performance char- 
acteristics of equipment. 

CE 462. Project Planning and Control II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 461 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Scheduling, analysis and control of construction projects. 

CE 464. Legal Aspects of Contracting 0-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option; elective 
Legal aspects of construction contract documents and specifications; owner- 
engineer-contractor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract 
performance; labor laws. 

CE 483. Water Resources Engineering I 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 382 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering 

The hydrological cycle is studied with particular emphasis on those phases 

that are of engineering significance. The occurrence and distribution of 

water; rainfall, runoff, ground water. The development and control of 

water resources. 

CE 484. Water Resources Engineering II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 483 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering 

A synthesis of mechanics, chemistry and hydrology in the design of elements 

of water resources systems. Water supply, treatment and distribution. Waste 

water collection, treatment and disposal. Consideration of flood control and 

stream flow regulation. 

CE 485. Elements of Hydraulics and Hydrology 3-0 

Prerequisite: EM 303 

Required of Seniors in Civil Engineering Construction Option 

Elements of fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrology, with application to 

problems in construction engineering. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 507. Airphoto Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils 

and surface drainage characteristics. Mr. McCullough. 

CE 508. Airphoto Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 507 

Engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils 

projects. Mr. McCullough. 

CE 514. Municipal Engineering Projects 0-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning 

and city engineering. Messrs. Horn, Smallwood. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 69 

CE 515. Transportation Operations 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 406 

The analysis of traffic and transportation engineering operations. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 516. Transportation Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 406 

The geometric elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 524. Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures 3-0 

Corequisite: CE 425 

Analysis and design of arches, culverts, dams, foundations and retaining 

walls. Mr. Bramer. 

CE 525, CE 526. Advanced Structural Analysis I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Analysis of rigid frames and continuous structures; treatment of redundant 

members and secondary stresses. Messrs. Bigelow, Ely. 

CE 527. Numerical Methods in Structural Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Newmark's numerical integration procedure and its applications; matrix 
operations, relaxation and iteration, finite difference method. Force and 
displacement methods, string polygon method. High-speed computation. 

Messrs. Bigelow, McDonald. 

CE 531. Experimental Stress Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 425 

Principles and methods of experimental analysis; dimensional analysis; 

applications to full-scale structures. Messrs. Bigelow, Bramer. 

CE 534. Plastic Analysis and Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 421 

Analysis of steel structure behavior beyond the elastic limit; concept of design 
for ultimate load and the use of load factors. Analysis and design of com- 
ponent parts of frames. Methods of predicting strength and deformation 
behavior of structures loaded in the plastic range. Bracing and connecting 
requirements for frame. Mr. Bramer. 

CE 535. Ultimate Strength Theory and Design 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 422 

Ultimate strength theories of axially loaded column, flexure, combined 
flexure and axial load, shear. Critical review of important research and 
their relationship with the development of design codes for reinforced 
concrete. Mr. Zia. 

CE 536. Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 422 

The principles of prestressed concrete. Materials. Methods of prestressing. 
Loss of prestress. Design of beams for bending, shear and bond. Ultimate 
strength. Deflection. Composite beams. Continuous beams. Special topics. 
Design Projects. Mr. Zia. 



70 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 544. Foundotion Engineering 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 342 

Subsoil investigations; excavations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; 
control of water; footing, grillage and pile foundations; caisson and coffer- 
dam methods of construction; legal aspects of foundation engineering. 

Messrs. Kashef, Wahls. 

CE 547. Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Physical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engi- 
neering purposes; stress relations and applications to a variety of funda- 
mental problems. Mr. Wahls. 

CE 548. Engineering Properties of Soils I 3-0 

Prerequisite: CE 342 

The study of soil properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, 
including properties of soil solids, basic clay mineral concepts, classification, 
identification, plasticity, permeability, capillarity and stabilization. Labora- 
tory work, includes classification, permeability and compaction tests. 

Mr. Kashef. 

CE 549. Engineering Properties of Soils II 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 548 

Continuation of CE 548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain 
relations and shear strength theories for soil. Laboratory work includes 
consolidation and shear strength tests. Mr. Kashef. 

CE 570. (See BO 570. Sanitary Microbiology.) 

CE 571. Theory of Water and Sewage Treatment 3-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Study of the physical and chemical principles underlying water and sewage 
treatment processes; diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium and ioniza- 
tion, anaerobic and aerobic stabilization processes, sludge conditioning and 
disposal. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 572. Unit Operations and Processes in Sanitary Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 571 

Processes and operations in sanitary engineering; sedimentation, aeration, 
filtration, adsorption, coagulation, softening, sludge digestion, aerobic treat- 
ment of sewage. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 573. Analysis of Water and Sewage 3-0 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Chemical and physical analysis of water and sewage and interpretation of 
results. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 574. Radioactive Waste Disposal 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PY 407 

Unit operations and processes employed in treatment and disposal of radio- 
active wastes. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 580. Flow in Open Channels 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CE 483 

The theory and applications of flow in open channels, including dimensional 
analysis, momentum-energy principle, gradually varied flow, high-velocity 
flow, energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel transitions and model 
studies. Mr. Amein. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 71 

CE 591, CE 592. Civil Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Discussions and reports of subjects in Civil Engineering and allied fields. 

Graduate Staff. 

CE 598. Civil Engineering Projects Credits by Arrangement 

Special projects in some phase of Civil Engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 
Courses for Graduates Only 

CE 601. Transportation Planning 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

The planning, administration, economics and financing of various trans- 
portation engineering facilities. Mr. Cribbins. 

CE 602. Advanced Transportation Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 516 

Design of major traffic and transportation engineering projects. 

Messrs. Cribbins, Horn. 

CE 603. Airport Planning and Design 3-0 

Corequisite: CE 515 

The analysis, planning and design of air transportation facilities. 

Mr. Horn. 

CE 604. Urban Transportation Planning 0-3 

Prerequisite: CE 515 

Thoroughfare planning as related to land usage and urban master-planning. 

Mr. Horn. 

CE 623. Theory and Design of Arches 3-0 

Prerequisites: CE 422, CE 526 

General theory of elastic arches. Boundary conditions and their effect on 
behavior of the arch. Single span, multiple span arches on elastic piers, 
influence lines of various functions under moving loads, economical layout 
of arches, design criteria for steel and concrete arches. Mr. Uyanik. 

CE 624. Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates 0-3 

Prerequisites: CE 623, EM 511 

Roof structures consisting of surfaces of revolution, both single and com- 
pound curved. Mebrane stresses, bending stresses at boundaries. Domes and 
cylindrical shells. Approximate and exact analyses. Design criteria. Folded 
plane structures of concrete plates and steel frames. Mr. Uyanik. 

CE 625, CE 626. Advanced Structural Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: CE 422 

Corequisites: CE 525, CE 526 

Complete structural designs of a variety of projects; principles of limit and 

prestress design. Mr. Uyanik. 

CE 627. Design of Blast Resistant Structures 3-0 

Prerequisites: CE 526, EM 555 

Sources, intensities, and methods of transmission of dynamic loads. Be- 
havior of structures and structural elements subjected to dynamic forces. 
Design criteria and factor of safety. Design of surface and underground 
structures for nuclear blasts. Mr. McDonald. 



72 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 641, CE 642. Advanced Soil Mechanics 3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction be- 
tween solids and water, and problems in elasticity pertaining to earthwork 
engineering soil dynamics. Mr. Wahls. 

CE 643. Hydraulics of Ground Water 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized 

porous media; the flow net solution; seepage and well problems. 

Mr. Kashef. 

CE 671. Advanced Water Supply and Sewerage 4-0 

Prerequisite: CE 484 

Problems relating to the design of water supply and sewerage works. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 672. Advanced Water and Sewage Treatment 0-4 

Prerequisite: CE 484 

Problems relating to the treatment of water and sewage. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 673. Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal 3 or 3 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Water requirements of industry and the disposal of industrial wastes. 

Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 674. Stream Sanitation 3 or 3 

Corequisite: CE 571 

Biological, chemical and hydrological factors that affect stream sanitation 

and stream use. Mr. Smallwood. 

CE 699. Civil Engineering Research Credits by Arrangement 

Independent investigation of an advanced Civil Engineering problem; a 
report of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF CROP SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Paul Henry Harvey, Head, Douglas Scales Chamblee, Dan 
Ulrich Gerstel, Walton Carlyle Gregory, Guy Langston Jones, Ken- 
neth Raymond Keller, Glenn Charles Klingman, Roy Lee Loworn, 
Philip Arthur Miller, Robert Parker Moore, Donald Loraine Thomp- 
son, Joseph Arthur Weybrew 

Professor Emeritus: Gordon Kennedy Middleton 

Associate Professors: Charles A. Brim, Will Allen Cope, John Wesley 
Dudley, Donald Allen Emery, Harry Douglass Gross, William Mason 
Lewis, Jackson R. Mauney, Donald Edwin Moreland, Lyle L. Phillips, 
Luther Shaw, David Harry Timothy, Robert Phillip Upchurch 

Assistant Professors: William Best Gilbert, Joshua Alexander Lee, Dar- 
rell Alvin Miller, Charles Franklin Murphy, Edward Carroll 
Sisler, Jerome Bernard Weber, David C. Whitenberg 

The Department of Crop Science offers to students interested in crop 
science training leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 73 

degrees in the fields of plant breeding, crop production, forage crops 
ecology, weed control, and plant chemistry. For students who wish a general 
training, the Master of Agriculture degree is offered. 

Excellent facilities for graduate training are available. Each student is 
assigned office and laboratory space. In addition, many special facilities 
are available such as preparation rooms for plant and soil samples, cold 
storage facilities for plant material, air-conditioned rooms for studying the 
physical properties of cotton fiber and tobacco leaf, and soil and plant 
analytical service laboratories. Greenhouse space and growth control cham- 
bers are provided for projects which require special facilities. Sixteen farms 
are owned and operated by the State for research investigations. These farms 
are located throughout the State and include a wide variety of soil and 
climatic conditions needed for experiments in plant breeding, crop man- 
agement, forage ecology, and weed control. 

Strong supporting departments greatly increase the graduate students' op- 
portunities for a broad and thorough training. Included among those depart- 
ments in which graduate students in crop science work cooperatively or 
obtain instructions are botany, chemistry, genetics, horticultural science, 
mathematics, plant pathology, entomology, soil science, and statistics. 

In North Carolina, a state which derives 80 per cent of its agricultural 
income from farm crops, the opportunities for the well trained agronomist 
are exceedingly great. The recipients of advanced degrees in crop science 
at North Carolina State are found in positions of leadership in research and 
education throughout the nation and the world. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

CS 413. Plant Breeding 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic principles to the improvement of economic 
plants, including discussions of the methods employed in the development 
and the perpetuation of desirable clones, varieties, and hybrids. 

CS 414. Weeds and Their Control. 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or Equivalent 

Principles involved in cultural and chemical weed control. Discussions on 
chemistry of herbicides and the effects of the chemicals on the plant. Iden- 
tification of common weeds and their seeds is given. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

CS 511. Tobacco Technology 0-2 

Prerequisites: CS 311, BO 421 or Equivalent 

A study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest 

research problems and findings dealing with this important cash crop will 
be discussed. Mr. Jones. 

CS 512. Grassland Dynamics 0-2 

Prerequisites: BO 421, ZO 301 or Equivalent 

A discussion of forage production practices of national and international 

importance. An attempt will be made to relate the seemingly divergent 



74 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

practices to fundamentals of physiology and ecology. The dynamic relation- 
ship among soil, plant, animal and man, as it affects production prac- 
tices and research, will be emphasized. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate 
years.) Mr. Gross. 

CS 541. (GN 541 or HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512, ST 511 Recommended 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and 

concepts of inheritance. Messrs. Haynes, Timothy. 

CS 542. (GN 542 or HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 

2 in Summer Sessions 
Prerequisite: CS 541 or GN 541 or HS 541 

Laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding 
techniques and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Mr. Harvey. 

CS 591. Special Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Admitted Only With Consent of Instructor 
Special problems in various phases of Crop Science. Problems may be 
selected or will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent 
and current research. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only* 

CS 611. Forage Crop Ecology 0-2 

Prerequisites: CS 412, BO 441 

A study of the effect of environmental factors on the growth of forage crops. 

Attention will be given to methods of research in forage ecology. 

Mr. Chamblee. 

CS 612. Special Topics in Weed Control 0-2 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: CS 414, CH 223, BO 534 

Detailed examination of current concepts and literature of weed control. The 
chemistry, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, microbiology, equipment, and 
techniques used in weed control research will be discussed. 

Graduate Staff. 

CS 613. (GN 613 or HS 613) Plant Breeding Theory 0-3 

Prerequisites: CS 541 or Equivalent, GN 513, ST 512 (A Course in Quanti- 
tative Genetics Recommended.) 

A study of theoretical bases for plant breeding procedures with special 
emphasis on the relationship between type and source of genetic variability, 
mode of reproduction and effectiveness of different selection procedures. The 
latest experimental approaches to plant breeding will be discussed as well 
as standard procedures. Mr. Dudley. 

CS 690. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special problems of in- 
terest to agronomists reviewed and discussed. 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, however, 
additional credits toward the doctorate are allowed. Graduate Staff. 



* Students are expected to consult the instructor before registration. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 75 

CS 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

A maximum of two credits is allowed towards the Master's degree, but no 

restrictions toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ernst W. Swanson, Head, Bernard Martin Olsen 

Associate Professors: Louis A. Dow, Gerald Garb, Cleon Wallace Harrell 

Assistant Professor: Ching Sheng Shen 

No graduate degrees are offered in economics at North Carolina State. The 
courses listed below are eligible for graduate credit when they form a part 
of an approved graduate program in other departments. Economics may serve 
as a minor field. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

EC 401, EC 402. Principles of Accounting 3-3 

Fundamental principles of accounting theory and practice; the analysis and 
recording of business transactions; explanation and interpretation of the 
structure, form and use of financial statements. 

EC 407. Business Law I 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

A course dealing wih elementary legal concepts, contracts, agency, negoti- 
able instruments, sales of personal property, chattel mortgages, partnerships, 
corporations, suretyship and bailments, insurance. 

EC 408. Business Law II 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 407 

Deals with real property, mortgages on urban and farm lands, landlord and 
tenant, requirements for valid deed, insurance law, wills, suretyship and 
conditional sales. 

EC 409. Accounting for Production Costs 3-3 

Prerequisite: EC 312 

An introduction to accounting problems peculiar to manufacturing, fabri- 
cation, and construction-type enterprises. Cost determination and allocation 
of costs for materials, labor, and overhead to the various units of product. 
Estimating and cost control in the production and manufacturing process. 
Special emphasis to be placed on managerial analysis and interpretation of 
cost data. 

EC 410. Industry Studies 3-0 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of organization, market structure, and competitive behavior in 
specific industries using the tools of the economist as a guide to pertinent 
factors and their significance. The course will be organized along the lines 
of intensive but broadly-relevant case-studies. 



76 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EC 411. Marketing Methods 3-3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Marketing institutions and their functions and agencies; retailing; market 

analysis; problems in marketing. 

EC 413. Competition, Monopoly, and Public Policy 3-3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205, EC 301 Recommended But Not Required 
An analysis of the effect of modern industrial structure on competitive 
behavior and performance, in the light of contemporary price theory and 
the theory of workable competition. A critical evaluation of the legislative 
content, judicial interpretation, and economic effects of the antitrust laws. 

EC 414. Tax Accounting 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 312 or EC 401 

An analysis of the Federal tax laws relating to the individual and business. 
Determining and reporting income. Payroll taxes and methods of reporting 
them. Actual practice in the preparation of income tax returns. 

EC 420. Corporation Finance 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

Financial instruments and capital structure; procuring funds; managing 
working capital; managing corporate capitalization; financial institutions 
and their work. 

EC 425. Industrial Management 3-0 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing 

Principles and techniques of modern scientific management; relation of 
finance, marketing, industrial relations, accounting, and statistics to produc- 
tion; production planning and control; analysis of economic, political 
and social influences on production. 

EC 426. Personnel Management 0-3 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing 

The scientific management of manpower, from the viewpoint of the super- 
visor and the personnel specialist. A study of personnel policy and a review 
of the scientific techniques regarding the specific problems of employment, 
training, promotion, transfer, health and safety, employee services, and joint 
relations. 

EC 431. Labor Problems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing 

An economic approach to labor problems including wages, hours, working 
conditions, insecurity, substandard workers, minority groups, social security, 
and public policy relative to these problems. 

EC 432. Industrial Relations 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing 

Collective bargaining. Analysis of basic labor law and its interpretation by 
the courts and governmental agencies. An examination of specific terms of 
labor contracts and their implications for labor and management. An 
examination of labor objectives and tactics and management objectives and 
tactics. Problems of operating under the labor contract. 

EC 440. Economics of Growth 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 302 

An examination of the institutional background required for national 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 77 

economic development. The conditions apparent for past growth of nations 
are compared with conditions obtaining in presently retarded nations. Con- 
clusions are drawn from this comparison to provide an introduction to 
theoretical models of growth. 

EC 442. Evolution of Economic Ideas 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205 

An analysis of the development of economic thought and method during the 
past two centuries. Economics considered as a cumulative body of knowledge, 
in a context of emerging technology, changing institutions, pressing new 
problems, and the growth of science. 

EC 446. Economic Forecasting 3-0 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 205, EC 302 Recommended But Not Required 
An examination of the basic principles and techniques of economic fore- 
casting with strong emphasis upon the economic models upon which fore- 
casting is based. 

EC 448. International Economics 3-0 

Prerequisites: EC 201, EC 202, EC 302 Recommended 

A study of international economics, including trade, investment, monetary 

relations, and certain aspects of economic development. Emphasis upon 

analytical and policy approaches, although some institutional material is 

included. 

EC 450. Economic Decision Processes 0-3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205 and MA 202 or MA 212 
An analysis of processes for decision making by individuals and groups. 
Linear programming, probability, and game theory in the light of a general 
theory of decision. 

EC 490, EC 491. Senior Seminars in Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructors 

The terminal courses in undergraduate study of economics. The student is 
assisted in summarizing his training, and in improving his capacity to 
recognize problems and to select logically consistent means of solving the 
problems. This is done on a small-group and individual basis. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EC 501. Intermediate Economic Theory 3-0 

Prerequisite: EC 301 or AGC 212, or Equivalent 

An intensive analysis of the determination of prices and of market behavior, 
including demand, cost and production, pricing under competitive condi- 
tions, and pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly competitive con- 
ditions. Messrs. Dow, Garb, Shen. 

EC 502. Money, Income, and Employment 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 302 or EC 501, or Equivalent 

A study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with 
particular reference to the role of monetary policy in maintaining full 
employment without inflation. Messrs. Garb, Olsen, Shen. 



78 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EC 510. (PS 510) Public Finance 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EG 201 or EC 205 

A survey of the theories and practices of governmental taxing, spending, 
and borrowing, including intergovernmental relationships and administra- 
tive practices and problems. Mr. Block. 

EC 525. Management Policy and Decision Making 3-0 

Prerequisites: Nine Hours in Economics and Related Courses and Consent 
of Instructor. 

A review and consideration of modern management processes used in 
making top-level policies and decisions. An evaluation of economic, social 
and institutional pressures, and of the economic and non-economic motiva- 
tions, which impinge upon the individual and the organization. The prob- 
lem of coordinating the objectives and the mechanics of management is 
examined. Messrs. Bartley, Wood. 

EC 531. Management of Industrial Relations 0-3 

Prerequisites: Nine Hours in Economics and Related Courses, Consent of the 
Instructor 

A seminar course designed to round out the technical student's program. 
Includes a survey of the labor movement organization and structure of 
unions, labor law and public policy, the union contract, the bargaining 
process, and current trends and tendencies in the field of collective bargain- 
ing. Messrs. Bartley, Wood. 

EC 541. Origins of the United States' Economy 3-0 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate Standing, EC 302, HI 261, or HI 333, or 

Equivalent 

A seminar on growth and development of American economic institutions. 

Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the growth of the economy 

of the United States and theories of economic development. Mr. Olsen. 

EC 550. Mathematical Models in Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, EC 450 Recommended 
But Not Required 

An introductory study of economic models emphasizing their formal proper- 
ties. The theory of individual economic units is presented as a special case 
in the theory of inductive behavior. Mathematical discussions of the theory 
of the consumer, the theory of the firm, and welfare economics will show 
the relevance of such topics as constrained maxima and minima, set theory, 
partially and simply ordered systems, probability theory, and game theory to 
economics. Mr. Harrell. 

EC 552. Econometrics 0-3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, MA 405, ST 362 
Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organi- 
zation. Optimal combination of integrated productive processes within the 
firm. Applications in the economics of industry and of agriculture. 

Messrs. Harrell, Stober. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 79 

EC 555. Linear Programming 3-3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 205, MA 202 or MA 212, MA 405 
Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation, and organi- 
zation. Optimal combination of integrated productive processes within the 
firm. Applications in the economics of industry and of agriculture. 

Messrs. Harrell, Garb. 

EC 590, EC 591. Seminar in Special Economic Topics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 

Topics presented by a visiting professor or special lecturer. This course will 

be offered from time to time as distinguished visiting scholars are available. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EC 601. Advanced Economic Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 501 or Equivalent 

A rigorous examination of contemporary microeconomic theory. 

Messrs. Dow, Garb, Shen, Swanson. 

EC 602. (A6C 602) Monetary and Employment Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 502 or Equivalent 

The course consists of an analysis of the forces determining the level of 
income and employment; a review of some of the theories of economic 
fluctuations; and a critical examination of a selected macroeconomic system. 

Messrs. Garb, Tolley. 

EC 603. History of Economic Thought 3-3 

Prerequisite: EC 442 or EC 501, or Equivalent 

A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic 
thought, designed in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate 
perspective for the understanding of contemporary economics. 

Messrs. Garb, Olsen, Swanson. 

EC 605. Research in Economics Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Individual research in economics, under staff supervision and direction. 

Graduate Staff. 

EC 640. Theory of Economic Growth 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: EC 440 or EC 502, or Equivalent 

Several theoretical models of economic growth are compared and analyzed. 
Contemporary developments in the theory of national economic growth are 
studied and evaluated for consistency with older theories. Mr. Olsen. 

EC 648. Theory of International Trade 0-3 

Prerequisite: EC 448 or EC 501, or Equivalent 

A consideration, on a seminar basis, of the specialized body of economic 
theory dealing with the international movement of goods, services, capital, 
and payments. Also, a theoretically-oriented consideration of policy. 

Mr. Swanson. 

EC 650. Economic Decision Theory 3-0 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or Equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

Study of general theories of choice. Structure of decision problems; the role 

of information; formulation of objectives. Current research problems. 

Mr. Harrell. 



80 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EC 655. Topics in Mathematical Economics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or Equivalent, EC 550 or EC 555 

A seminar and research course devoted to recent literature and developments 

in mathematical economics. Messrs. Garb, Harrell. 

EC 665. Economic Behavior of the Organization 0-3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 or Equivalent, Consent of Instructor 
This seminar will apply methods and findings derived from the behavioral 
sciences to the economic behavior of the organization, particularly the 
business firm. Among the approaches which may be utilized are organiza- 
tion theory, information theory, reference group theory, and decision theory. 

Messrs. Swanson, Harrell. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION* 

James Bryant Kirkland, Dean 
Professor: Herbert Elvin Speece 
Associate Professor: Norman M. Chansky 

The School of Education offers graduate programs leading to the master's 
degree for students majoring in Agricultural Education, Industrial Arts 
Education, Industrial Education, Occupational Information and Guidance, 
and Industrial Psychology. Graduate students in education may pursue pro- 
grams leading to the degree of Master of Science or Master of Education. 
Both degrees are recognized by the State Department of Education. 

The Master of Science degree is regarded as a research degree and as 
preparation for further graduate study. Programs leading to the Master of 
Science degree are planned to include a major (twenty credit hours) in some 
specialized area of education and minor (ten or more credit hours) in some 
other field such as psychology or agricultural economics. If two minors are 
chosen, a minimum of six credits will be required in each. 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language is required. A 
thesis representing an original investigation in the major field must be 
prepared. 

The Master of Education degree is designed to meet the needs of students 
who are preparing themselves for teaching in the secondary schools. The 
program of study meeting the requirements for the professional degree 
differs from that for the Master of Science degree in that in the former a 
wider latitude is permitted in the choice of course work outside the major. 

A problem may be substituted for a thesis if, in the opinion of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee, this alternative contributes maximally to the 
student's objective. 

A knowledge of a foreign language is not required to meet the require- 
ments for the professional degree. 

The School of Education is located in Tompkins Hall where laboratories 
and research facilities are provided for graduate study. 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships are available 
for qualified graduate students. National Defense Education Act loans are 
also available for graduate students needing financial aid. 

' Following the School of Education's general write-up and description of courses are sections 
pertaining to the departments within the school. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 81 

General Courses 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 501. Education of Exceptional Children 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours in Education or Psychology 

Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child 
with major interest on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. Practice 
will be given in curriculum instruction for groups of children, individual 
techniques for dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. 
Opportunity for individual work with an exceptional child will be provided. 

Mr. Corter. 

ED 502. Analysis of Reading Abilities 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours in Education or Psychology 

A study of tests and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of 

reading retardation and factors underlying reading difficulties. 

Mr. Rust. 

ED 503. Improvement of Reading Abilities 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Education or Psychology 

A study of methods used in developing specific reading skills or in over- 
coming certain reading difficulties; a study of methods used in developing 
pupil vocabularies and work analysis skills; a study of how to control vocabu- 
lary burden of reading material. Mr. Rust. 

ED 552. Industrial Arts in the Elementary School 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Twelve Credits in Education and Consent of Instructor 
This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principles under- 
stand how tools and materials and industrial processes may be used to 
vitalize and supplement the elementary school children's experiences. Prac- 
tical children's projects along with the building of classroom equipment. 

Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 563. Effective Teaching 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or Equivalent 

Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course 
approaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effec- 
tive learning; relationship of learning and doing; responsibility for learn- 
ings; evaluation of teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective 
teaching. Mr. Scarborough. 

ED 595. (See IA 595. Industrial Arts Workshop.) 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 614. Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve Hours in Education 

Foundations of modern programs of secondary education purposes, curricu- 
lum, organization, administration, and the place and importance of the high 
school in the community in relation to contemporary social force. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 615. Introduction to Educational Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: Twelve Hours in Education 

An introductory course for students preparing for an advanced degree. The 



82 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

purposes are: to assist the student in understanding the meaning and pur- 
pose of educational research and the research approach to problems, to de- 
velop students' ability to identify educational problems, and to plan and 
carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the preparation of the 
research report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of research. 
Consideration is also given to the educator as a consumer of research. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 665. Supervising Student Teaching 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Twelve Hours in Education 

A study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special 
consideration will be given the role of the supervising teacher including the 
following areas: planning for effective student teaching, observation and 
orientation, school community study, analysis of situation, evaluating student 
teacher, and coordination with North Carolina State. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Fifteen Credits and Permission of the Advisor 
Individual research on a specific problem of concern to the student. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Clarence Cayce Scarborough, Head, James Bryant Kirkland 
Associate Professor: Lawrence William Drabick 
Assistant Professor: Homer Edwin Beam 
Adjunct Professor: Gerald Blaine James 

The Department of Agricultural Education offers programs of study leading 
to the Master of Science and the Master of Education degrees. Graduate pro- 
grams are designed to meet the needs of the individual student. The depart- 
ment emphasizes instruction that will prepare the student for the role of a 
local educational leader. In addition to agricultural education courses, pro- 
grams include courses in rural sociology, agricultural economics and public 
administration. All programs emphasize research. As a part of the graduate 
program, each student must complete a thesis or a research problem. 

In addition to the many resources available to all North Carolina State 
graduate students, agricultural education students have available administra- 
tive and supervisor)- personnel staff members of the State Department of 
Public Instruction which is located in Raleigh. The State Director and Asso- 
ciate Director of Vocational Education, former members of North Carolina 
State faculty, are available as consultants to graduate students in agricultural 
education. Other members of the State Department of Public Instruction 
staff are also available for consultation. 

A limited number of assistantships are available. Preference is given to 
experienced educational leaders in the field. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 83 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 554. Planning Programs in Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or Equivalent 

Analysis of theory of planning and change. Consideration of the need for 
planning programs in Agricultural Education; objectives and evaluation of 
community programs; use of advisory groups; organization and use of fa- 
cilities; role of the leader. Messrs. Beam, Scarborough. 

ED 568. Adult Education in Agriculture 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or Equivalent 

Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to 
study some of the basic problems and values in working with adult groups. 
Particular attention will be given to the leadership role in educational pro- 
grams for adults. Messrs. Beam, Scarborough. 

ED 593. Special Problems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 411 or Equivalent 

Opportunities for students to study current problems under the guidance of 

the staff. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 617. Philosophy of Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 554 or Equivalent 

An examination of educational philosophies and their relation to current 

educational programs in agricultural education. Mr. Scarborough. 

ED 664. Supervision in Agricultural Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 563 or Equivalent 

Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of super- 
visory practice; theory, principles and techniques of effective supervision in 
Agricultural Education at different levels. Mr. Scarborough. 

ED 693. Advanced Problems 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 558 or Equivalent 

Study of current and advanced problems in the teaching and administration 
of educational programs; evaluation of procedures and consideration for im- 
proving. Graduate Staff. 

ED 694. Seminar in Agricultural Education 1-1 

A critical review of current problems, articles, and books of interest to stu- 
dents of agricultural education. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professor: Ivan Hostetler, Head 
Associate Professor: Talmage Brian Young 

The Department of Industrial Arts offers graduate work leading to the 
Master of Science degree and the Master of Education degree. Industrial Arts 
majors may select one or two minors in such fields as guidance, psychology, 
sociology, or school administration. 



84 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professional and laboratory courses are provided on the graduate level to 
assure a well-rounded program of graduate studies. Special emphasis is being 
given and special funds provided for the development of an Experimental 
Laboratory with specialized equipment which will be used exclusively by 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students for experimentation and re- 
search. The industrial arts facilities of the public schools are also available 
for research work. 

Teaching and graduate assistantships are available each year for experi- 
enced teachers interested in pursuing graduate work. Loans may also be 
secured through the National Defense Education Act for graduate students. 

Holders of Master's degrees in Industrial Arts Education are much in de- 
mand for supervisory and teaching positions in the public schools and colleges. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

IA 510. Design for Industrial Arts Teachers 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Six Hours of Drawing and IA 205 or Equivalent 
A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on the 
relationship of material and form in the selection and designing of industrial 
arts projects. Graduate Staff. 

IA 560. (ED 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Twelve Hours in Education and Teaching Experience 
This course is a study of the new developments in industrial arts education. 
It is designed to assist teachers and administrators in developing new con- 
cepts and new content based on the changes in technology. They will be 
required to re-evaluate their programs in the light of these new concepts and 
the new content. Mr. Hostetler. 

IA 570. Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor 
Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors 
in industrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their 
knowledge and abilities through investigation and research in the various 
fields of industrial arts, such as metals, plastics, or ceramics. 

Graduate Staff. 

IA 592. Special Problems in Industrial Arts Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: One Term of Student Teaching or Equivalent 
The purpose of these courses is to broaden the subject matter experiences in 
the areas of industrial arts. Problems involving experimentation, investigation 
and research in one or more industrial arts areas will be required. 

Graduate Staff. 

IA 595. (ED 595) Industrial Arts Workshop 3-3 

Prerequisite: One or More Years of Teaching Experience 
A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial 
arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices 
for initiating, conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees 
will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and will do intensive re- 
search work on individual and group problems. 

Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 85 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 630. Philosophy of Industrial Arts 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve Hours in Education 

Required of All Graduate Students in Industrial Arts Education 
Current and historical developments in Industrial Arts; philosophical con- 
cepts, functions, scope, criteria for the selection and evaluation of learning 
experiences, laboratory organization, student personnel program, community 
relationships, teacher qualifications, and problems confronting the industrial 
arts profession. Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 635. Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts 2 or 2 

Prerequisite: Twelve Hours in Education 

A study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision in 
the improvement of Industrial Arts in the public schools. Selection of teachers 
and their improvements in service and methods of evaluating industrial arts 
programs. Mr. Hostetler. 

ED 692. Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in Industrial 

Arts Education. Mr. Hostetler. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Graduate Faculty 

Professor: Durwin M. Hanson, Head, Joseph T. Nerden 

The Department of Industrial Education offers graduate work leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education. The rapid develop- 
ment of industrial and technical education in North Carolina and through- 
out the nation provides many opportunities for teachers and administrators 
who have earned advanced degrees. 

The facilities at North Carolina State afford an excellent program of sup- 
porting courses at the graduate level in the related fields of science, mathe- 
matics, guidance, psychology, sociology, economics, statistics, and engineering. 
The prerequisite for graduate work in Industrial Education is a proficiency 
in the undergraduate courses required for the bachelor's degree in Industrial 
Education, or a substantial equivalent. 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships are available for 
qualified graduate students. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 516. Community Occupational Surveys 0-2 

Prerequisites: Six Credits in Education, Consent of Instructor 
Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of find- 
ings in planning a program of vocational education. 

Graduate Staff. 



86 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 521. Organization of Related Study Materials 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ED 422 

The principles of selecting and organizing both technical and general related 
instructional material for trade extension and industrial cooperative training 
classes. Graduate Staff. 

ED 525. Trade Analysis and Course Construction 3-0 

Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 304 

Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of de- 
termining teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial 
course organization based on occupational analysis covering instruction in 
skills and technology and including course outlines, job sequences, the de- 
velopment of instructional materials and schedules. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 527. Philosophy of Industrial and Technical Education 0-3 

Prerequisites: ED 422, ED 440 

A presentation of the historical development of industrial and technical 
education; the types of programs, philosophy, trends and problems of voca- 
tional-industrial education; study of Federal and State legislation pertaining 
to industrial education, practical nurse education and technical education. 

Mr. Nerden. 

ED 528. Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ED 422, ED 440 

A study of the developments, the objectives, and principles of industrial 
cooperative training. The organization, promotion and management of pro- 
grams in this area of vocational education. 

Graduate Staff. 

ED 529. Curriculum Materials Development 3-3 

Prerequisite: ED 525 

Selection and organization of curricula used in vocational-industrial and 
technical education; development of curricula and instructional materials. 

Mr. Hanson. 

ED 591. Special Problems in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six Hours Graduate Work and Permission of Department Head 
Directed study other than thesis problem to provide individualized study 
and analysis in a specialized area of trade, industrial or technical education. 

Messrs. Hanson, Nerden. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 609. Planning and Organizing Technical Educational Programs 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, ED 420, ED 440, ED 516 
Principles of planning and organizing technical education programs spon- 
sored by Federal vocational acts. Professional course for coordinators and 
directors, with emphasis on the organization of post high school technical 
education level. Survey of needs, building plans, equipping and maintenance 
of buildings, financial structure, and personnel organization and manage- 
ment. 

Messrs. Hanson, Nerden. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 87 

ED 610. Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: PSY 304, ED 344, ED 420, ED 440 or Equivalent 
Administrative and supervisory problems of vocational education; practices 
and policies of Federal and State offices; organization and administration of 
city and consolidated systems. Messrs. Hanson, Nerden. 

ED 691. Seminar in Industrial Education 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Permission of the Instructor 
Reviews and reports of topics of special interest to graduate students in 
Industrial Education. The course will be offered from time to time in ac- 
cordance with the availability of distinguished professors. 

Messrs. Hanson, Nerden. 



DEPARTMENT OF 

OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professor: Roy Nels Anderson, Head 
Associate Professor: Charles G. Morehead 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance has been 
training guidance and personnel workers for more than four decades. The 
first master's degree was awarded in 1926. The programs of graduate study 
are planned to develop a broad understanding of guidance and personnel 
services to be applied in various settings. It is most desirable for an applicant 
who wishes to specialize in guidance and personnel services to have had 
undergraduate course work in economics, education, psychology, sociology, 
or social work. Students accepted into the program are those who anticipate 
devoting full or part time to guidance and personnel work. Teachers, ad- 
ministrators and others who wish to increase their knowledge of guidance 
and personnel may enroll for courses as a graduate minor or for certification 
renewal. 

Professional opportunities for placement in this field are on the increase. 
The department prepares students for positions as counselors in secondary 
schools, industrial education centers, colleges, community agencies, school 
or county guidance directors, rehabilitation counselors, employment counse- 
lors, placement interviewers, and personnel workers in higher education, 
business or industry, and State and Federal Government agencies. The 
student may specialize in one of several areas depending upon his career 
goals. 

The master's program includes a core of guidance and personnel courses 
to be selected according to the student's vocational goals. Students may select 
their minor from the following areas: economics, psychology, sociology and 
anthropology. The master's degree program of the department meets the 
requirements for the Counselor's Certificate issued by the North Carolina 
State Department of Public Instruction, as well as counselor certification in 
many other states. 

The Department of Occupational Information and Guidance has had a 
contract with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation for the training of 
Rehabilitation Counselors, and has been awarded five Counseling and 



88 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Guidance Training Institutes under contract with the United States Office 
of Education as authorized by the National Defense Education Act of 1958. 
The department also provides service courses in guidance and personnel 
for undergraduate students in the School of Education. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ED 520. Personnel and Guidance Services 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Education or Psychology 

An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles, and practices of 
personnel and guidance services; the relationship of personnel services with 
the purposes and objectives of the school and the curriculum. 

Mr. Morehead. 

ED 524. Occupational Information 0-3 

Prerequisites: Six Hours of Education or Psychology and ED 520 or Equiva- 
lent 

This course is intended to give teachers, counselors, placement workers, and 
personnel workers in business and industry an understanding of how to col- 
lect, classify, evaluate, and use occupational and educational information. 
This will include a study of the world of work, sources of occupational 
information, establishing an educational-occupational information library, 
using educational, occupational, and social information, and sociological and 
psychological factors influencing career planning. 

Mr. Morehead. 

ED 530. Group Guidance 3-0 

Prerequisites: Six Hours of Education or Psychology and ED 520 or Equiva- 
lent 

This course is designed to help teachers, counselors, administrators, and 
others who work with groups, or who are responsible for group guidance 
activities, to understand the theory and principles of effective group work, 
to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, and to plan and or- 
ganize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. 

Mr. Morehead. 

ED 533. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 0-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and ED 520 or Equivalent 
This course is designed for school guidance counselors, prospective counse- 
lors, personnel and guidance directors, and school administrators. The 
philosophy and scope of guidance and personnel services; the functions and 
responsibilities of personnel involved; basic principles and current practices 
in planning, developing, operating, and supervising guidance and personnel 
services will be studied. Administrative relationships, utilization of school 
staff, interrelationships of guidance services with instruction, and evaluation 
of guidance services will be considered. 

Mr. Morehead. 

ED 590. Individual Problems in Guidance Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Six Hours Graduate Work in Department or Equivalent 
Intended for individuals or group studies of one or more of the major 
problems in guidance and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 89 

the interests of individuals. The workshop procedure will be used whereby 
special projects and reports will be developed by individuals and by groups. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ED 631. Educational and Vocational Guidance 3-0 

Prerequisite: Nine Hours from Following Fields— Economics, Education, Psy- 
chology or Sociology 

This course aims to provide training for teachers who are part-time or full- 
time counselors, employment interviewers, social workers and personnel 
workers, who are aiding individuals with vocational adjustment problems. 
The course will cover the functions performed in vocation and educational 
guidance such as assembling and imparting occupational information, coun- 
seling regarding vocational and educational plans, the use of aptitude tests, 
placement in jobs and follow-up, and procedures in setting up services of 
vocational and educational guidance in schools, employment offices, and 
social services agencies. Mr. Anderson. 

ED 633. Techniques of Counseling 0-3 

Prerequisite: Nine Hours from Following Fields— Economics, Education, Psy- 
chology or Sociology 

This course is designed to aid the personnel worker in the secondary school, 
college, employment office, social agency to develop an understanding and to 
develop skill in counseling techniques; philosophies, theories, principles and 
practices of counseling will be considered. Students will become acquainted 
with counseling techniques through lectures, demonstrations, case histories 
and tape recordings. Attention will be given to both diagnosis and treatment. 

Mr. Anderson. 

ED 641. Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling 2-6 

Prerequisite: Advanced Graduate Standing 

A practicum course in which the student participates in actual counseling 
experience under supervision in a school, college, social service agency, 
employment office, and business or industrial establishment. The student 
may observe and participate in some personnel and guidance services and 
may study the organization and administration of the program. 

Messrs. Anderson, Morehead. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Howard G. Miller, Head, Key Lee Barkley, Harold Maxwell 

Corter 
Associate Professors: Norman M. Chansky, John Oliver Cook, Joseph 

Clyde Johnson, Slater Edmund Newman, Paul James Rust 
Assistant Professors: Thomas Sanderson Baldwin, Eugene Edwin Bernard, 

Donald W. Drewes, Robert E. Lubow 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: Gilbert Gottlieb 

The Department of Psychology offers courses leading to the Master of 



90 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Science degree. An industrial option includes courses in the application of 
scientific methods to the study of industrial behavior based on strong re- 
search training. An experimental option provides a program with major 
emphasis on the development of proficiency in experimental methodology 
in psychological research. Human factors and human engineering training 
may be elected as a part of the industrial or experimental options. A pro- 
gram is offered which provides professional competence in school psychology. 

All programs are designed to provide the student with solid grounding in 
the basic areas of psychology. A set of required core courses includes statis- 
tics, social psychology, experimental psychology, psychology of personality, 
and the theory and method of measurement. 

A minimum of thirty semester hours of graduate credit is required for the 
master's degree, but the actual graduate program for each student is deter- 
mined on the basis of his individual needs, interests, and accomplishments 
and very likely will require hours in excess of this minimum. 

Admission requirements for graduate study in the Department of Psy- 
chology are a minimum of twenty semester credit hours in undergraduate 
psychology, the maintenance of a "B" average in undergraduate psychology 
courses, satisfactory grades in other collegiate studies, and satisfactory refer- 
ences from faculty and others in regard to character and quality of work. In 
some cases provisional acceptance is granted where some of the requirements 
are not met. 

The physical facilities for the training of graduate students in psychology 
include testing, statistics, general and human engineering laboratories. 

In addition to teaching and basic research activities, the Department of 
Psychology carries on research for industrial, military and other organiza- 
tions. To facilitate this activity, the Industrial Psychology Center has been 
established as a special organization within the department. 

A limited number of research and teaching assistantships are available 
annually. These assistantships are usually based on one-third time assign- 
ments, but are also occasionally for one-half time. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PSY 438. Industrial Psychology II 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 337 

The application of psychological principles to the problems of modern in- 
dustry; with particular emphasis on human relations and supervision. 

Mr. Miller. 

PSY 441. Human Factors in Equipment Design 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 337 recommended 

Human factors in the design of machines and other equipment. Items of 
equipment are understood as extensions of man's capacity to sense, compre- 
hend, and control his environment. Includes problems in the psychology of 
information, communication, control, and invention. 

Mr. Baldwin. 

PSY 464. Visual Perception for Designers 3-0 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The nature of the seeing process and its relation to architecture, industrial 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 91 

arts, and to the industrial engineering, and textile design fields. Topics in- 
clude the basis of sight, perception of color and form, vision and illumina- 
tion, psychological factors in visual design, and a unit of training planned 
to improve the student's ability to perceive visual form. 

Mr. Bernard. 

PSY 475. Child Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304 

The development of the individual child of the elementary school age will 
be the inclusive object of study in this course. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the intellectual, social, emotional, and personality development of the 
child. Physical growth will be emphasized as necessary to an understanding 
of the psychological development of the pupil. 

Mr. Barkley. 

PSY 476. Psychology of Adolescence 2-2 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

Nature and source of the problems of adolescents in western culture; emo- 
tional, social, intellectual and personality development of adolescents. 

Messrs. Barkley, Johnson. 

PSY 490. Sociol Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 200 

The individual in relation to social factors. Socialization, personality de- 
velopment, communication, social conflict and social change. 

Messrs. Barkley, Miller. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PSY 501. Experimental Psychology 3-3 

Prerequisite: Nine Hours of Psychology 

Experimental study of problems in general and theoretical psychology with 
particular emphasis on sensation and perception. Particular attention is paid 
to problem formulation, experimental design and experimental methods. 
Effective written and oral performance by the student is a basic objective. 

Messrs. Barkley, Cook, Newman. 

PSY 502. Physiological Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisites: Twelve Hours of Psychology, Including PSY 200, PSY 201 
A survey of the physiological bases of behavior including the study of co- 
ordination, sensory processes, brain functions, emotions, and motivation. 

Messrs. Bernard, Corter. 

PSY 504. Advanced Educational Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours in Psychology 

A critical appraisal of current psychological findings that are relevant to 

educational practice and theory. Mr. Johnson. 

PSY 511. Advanced Social Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 514 

A study of social relationships and their psychological bases; emphasis on 
those aspects of behavior determined by personal interactions; work will in- 
volve analysis of representative research studies, and individual projects. 

Mr. Miller. 



92 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PSY 514. Psychological Research Design 1-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Psychology 

The objectives of this course are to acquaint students with current develop- 
ments in theory and research in several areas of psychological interests; to 
foster capability to derive experimentally testable hypotheses, and experi- 
mental tests of these hypotheses; to write and speak effectively about theory 
and experimentation in psychology. Graduate Staff. 

PSY 530. Abnormal Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 302 

A study of the causes, symptomatic behavior, and treatment of the major 
personality disturbances, emphasis also placed on preventive mental hygiene 
methods. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 535. Tests and Measurements 3-3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours in Psychology 

A study of standard tests with an emphasis on the selection and use of 

such instruments. Mr. Johnson. 

PSY 550. Mental Hygiene in Teaching 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours in Psychology 

A survey of mental hygiene principles applicable to teachers and pupils; 
practical problems in prevention and treatment of psychological problems 
in schools; case studies and research. 

Messrs. Barkley, Corter. 

PSY 565. Industrial Management Psychology 3-3 

Prerequisite: Nine Hours of Psychology 

A study of the application of behavioral science, particularly psychology and 

social psychology to organizational and management problems. 

Mr. Miller. 

PSY 570. Theories of Personality 3-0 

Prerequisite: Nine Hours in Psychology 

A survey of modern theories of personality with some emphasis on intelli- 
gence and cognitive factors. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 576. Developmental Psychology 0-3 

Prerequisites: Nine Hours in Psychology, including PSY 476 or PSY 475 
A survey of the role of growth and development in human behavior; par- 
ticularly of the child and adolescent periods. This course will pay particular 
attention to basic principles and theories in the area of developmental 
psychology. Mr. Johnson. 

PSY 578. Individual Differences 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Flours in Psychology 

Nature, extent, and practical implications of individual differences and 

individual, variation. Mr. Barkley. 

PSY 591. Individual Intelligence Measurement 0-3 

Prerequisite: Psychology 570 

A practicum in individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechs- 

ler-Bellevue, Stanford-Binet, report writing, and case studies. Mr. Corter. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 93 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PSY 604. Advanced Experimental Psychology: Learning and Motivation 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: PSY 501 or Equivalent 

The objectives of this course are to promote familiarity with the kinds of 
research currently being conducted widiin the areas of "learning and 
motivation;" to foster effective performance in writing, speaking and read- 
ing in this area, in the derivation of hypotheses capable of experimental 
test and in the design of experiments to test them. 

Messrs. Cook, Newman. 

PSY 606. Behavior Theory 0-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 200, a Course in Learning, Experimental Psychology and 
Statistics 

A study of the most fundamental considerations in behavior theory. Such 
topics as criteria of scientific meaningfulness, the nature of scientific ex- 
planation, the application of formal, logical techniques to theory analysis, 
the nature of probability, operationism, intervening variables, etc., will be 
covered. The aim of the course is to develop skill in handling theoretical 
concepts, the ability to analyze and evaluate theories, to deduce hypotheses 
from them, and to devise means of testing them. Mr. Cook. 

PSY 607. Advanced Industrial Psychology I 3-0 

Prerequisites: Nine Hours of Psychology and Statistics or Concurrent with 

Statistics 

Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding 

of industrial behavior. Messrs. Baldwin, Drewes, Miller. 

PSY 608. Advanced Industrial Psychology II 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 607 

Application of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of 
industrial behavior. Messrs. Baldwin, Drewes, Miller. 

PSY 610. Theories of Learning 0-3 

Prerequisite: PSY 604 

The objectives of this course are to promote learning of the theories cur- 
rently used to explain how learning and forgetting occur so that testable 
consequences of these theories can be derived and so that the theories and 
their testable consequences are capably written and spoken about. 

Messrs. Cook, Newman. 

PSY 635. Psychological Measurement 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 511 or Equivalent and Twelve Hours of Psychology 
Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical problems and techniques 
in test construction. Mr. Drewes. 

PSY 690. Seminar in Industrial Psychology 3-3 

Scientific articles, analysis of experimental designs in industrial psychology, 
and study of special problems of interest to graduate students in Industrial 
Psychology. Messrs. Baldwin, Drewes, Miller. 

PSY 691. Personality Measurement 3-3 

Prerequisites: PSY 570, PSY 571 

Theory and practicum in individual personality testing of children and 
adults with emphasis on projective techniques, other personality measures, 
report writing and case studies. Mr. Corter. 



94 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PSY 693. Psychological Clinic Practicum Maximum 12 

Prerequisite: Eight Hours in Psychology 

Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and ad- 
ministration of psychological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults 
and children. Mr. Corter. 

PSY 699. Research in Psychology Credits by Arrangement 

Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is allowed 
toward the Master's degree. Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: George Burnham Hoadley, Head, William John Barclay, 
Arthur Raymond Eckels, William Damon Stevenson, Jr., Graduate 
Administrator 

Associate Professors: Norman Robert Bell, Edward George Manning, 
Wilbur Carroll Peterson 

Assistant Professor: Robert Walter Lade 

Visiting Professor: Makoto Itoh 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate work in electrical engi- 
neering at the first-year or master's level is limited to one or two areas of 
specialization. In the more advanced study for the doctorate a comprehen- 
sive understanding of all fields of electrical engineering is required, and 
specialization appears in the research problem undertaken. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature, such as electrical 
network synthesis and electromagnetic waves, are recommended for all 
graduate students in electrical engineering, and are required of those who 
plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. Minor 
sequences of study in advanced mathematics or physics are planned to fit 
the needs of individual students. 

The laboratories of the department are equipped for research in elec- 
tronic circuits, in automatic controls, and in solid-state devices. Active 
research is in progress, especially in the solid-state area where our laboratory 
equipment makes possible the construction of a wide variety of solid-state 
devices. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

EE 401. Advanced Circuits and Fields 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301 

Required of Seniors in EE 

Transient analysis of electric circuits by the Laplace transform method, the 

study of transient and sinusoidal steady-state response in terms of poles and 

zeros of network functions. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 95 

EE 402. Advanced Circuits and Fields 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 302, MA 301 
Required of Seniors in EE 

A study of classical electric and magnetic field theory and its application 
to problems of electrical engineering. Consideration of electrostatics, radia- 
tion, and guided waves. 

EE 411. Electrical Engineering Senior Seminar 1-0 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

Required of Seniors in EE 

Weekly meetings for the delivery and discussion of student papers on topics 

of current interest in Electrical Engineering. 

EE 430. Essentials of Electrical Engineering 4-0 

Prerequisite: EE 301 or EE 332 

Not Available to Undergraduates in Electrical Engineering 
Essential theory of electric circuits, including electron tubes, solid state 
devices, transformers and rotating machines as needed to supply the electri- 
cal background for instrumentation and control theory. Intended primarily 
for graduate students who do not have an electrical engineering under- 
graduate degree. 

EE 431. Electronic Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 314 
Departmental Elective for Seniors 

Comprehensive coverage of circuits and equipment using electronic devices; 
variable frequency effects; amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, detectors, wave- 
shaping circuits, generators of non-linear waveforms; basic pulse techniques; 
principles of electronic analogue computers. Emphasis on quantitative 
analysis and engineering design. 

EE 432. Communication Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 431 

Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

Application of electronic circuits and equipment to communication systems. 

Generation and modulation of radio frequency power. Elements of complete 

systems, wave propagation, antennas, transmitters, receivers, television, 

radar, electronic navigation systems, noise, special applications. 

EE 433. Electric Power Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 301, EE 305 

Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

A study of industrial power supply and power factor correction; direct and 

alternating current motor characteristics, starting methods, dynamic braking 

and speed control; motor applications, and industrial control apparatus. 

EE 434. Power Svstem Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 305 

Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

Analysis of problems encountered in the long-distance transmission of 

electric power. Line parameters of the method of geometric mean distances. 

Circle diagrams, symmetrical components, and fault calculations. Elementary 

concepts of power system stability. Applications of digital computers to 

power-system problems. 



96 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EE 435. Elements of Control 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 314 and EE 305, or EE 430 
Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

Introductory theory of open and closed loop control. Functions and per- 
formance requirements of typical control systems and system components. 
Dynamic analysis of error detectors, amplifiers, motors, demodulators, ana- 
logue components and switching devices. Component transfer characteristics 
and block diagram representation. 

EE 438. Instrumentation in Nuclear Technology 0-3 

Prerequisites: Either EE 430 or EE 301 and EE 314; also MA 301 
Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

Required course in Nuclear Engineering, Instrumentation Option. Radiation 
detectors, pulse amplifiers, pulse shapers, amplitude discriminators, counters, 
coincidence circuits. 

EE 440. Fundamentals of Digital Systems 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 314 or EE 430 
Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

The basic theory of digital computation and control. Introduction to num- 
ber systems, data handling, relay algebra, switching logic, memory circuits, 
the application of electronic devices to switching circuits and the design of 
computer control circuits. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EE 503. Linear Network Theory 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 314, MA 301, B Average in EE and MA 
Analysis of linear networks, with emphasis on the system functions of the 
network in the frequency domain and response in the time domain. 

Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 504. Introduction to Network Synthesis 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 503 

A development of the methods of network synthesis of one-port and two- 
port passive structures based on partial fraction techniques. 

Mr. Stevenson. 

EE 506. Dynamical Analogies 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 301 or EE 331; EM 312 or EM 301; MA 301; B Average 
in EE, EM and MA 

A study of dynamic systems in various branches of engineering and science 
with emphasis on the similarities that exist among such integrated groups 
of devices. Analogous elements and quantities in these fields as determined 
from equations basic to each. Analytical formulation of system problems 
in acoustical, electrical, mechanical, and related fields and their solution 
by analog methods. Use of electronic analog computers for the solution of 
system problems. Mr. Eckels. 

EE 507. Electromagnetics 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 314, MA 301; B Average in EE and MA 
Basic principles of electromagnetic field theory in vector analysis formula- 
tion, including static electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations and 
applications to guided waves. Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 97 

EE51T. Electronic Circuits 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430, B Average in EE and MA 
Solid-state and vacuum electronic devices in amplifiers, feedback systems, 
oscillators, modulators, switching and wave-shaping circuits. Generation of 
nonlinear waveforms; electronic instruments; circuits basic to electronic 
computers. Use of complex frequency concepts to obtain generalized re- 
sponse. Communication, power, and industrial applications. Synthesis of 
circuits to satisfy system requirements. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 512. Communication Theory 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 431, B Average in EE and MA 

The frequency and time domain, modulation, random signal theory, auto- 
correlation, basic information theory, noise, communication systems. 

Mr. Barclay. 

EE 516. Feedback Control Systems 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 401, EE 435 
Departmental Elective for Seniors in EE 

Study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such 
as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Theory of regulating systems 
and servo-mechanisms. Steady state and transient responses. Evaluation of 
stability. Transfer function loci and root locus plots. Analysis using differ- 
ential equation and operational methods. System compensation and intro- 
duction to design. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 517. Control Systems Laboratory 0-1 

Corequisite: EE 516 

Laboratory study of feedback systems for automatic control of physical quan- 
tities such as voltage, speed and mechanical position. Characteristics of 
regulating systems and servo-mechanisms. The laboratory work is intended 
to contribute to an understanding of the theory developed in EE 516, Feed- 
back Control Systems. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 520. Fundamentals of Logic Systems 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430; B Average in EE and MA 
A study of switching algebra, logic circuitry, systematic minimization, block 
diagrams, logic systems in computers, diode and transistor logic, symmetric 
functions, iterative networks, cascaded systems, sequential circuits, and 
pulsed operation. Mr. Bell. 

EE 521. Digital Computer Technology and Design 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 520 

A study of the internal organization and structure of digital systems includ- 
ing toggle circuits, gates and pulse circuitry. Analysis and synthesis of the 
major components of computers, and their integration into a complete sys- 
tem. Mr. Bell. 

EE 531. Introduction to Solid State Devices 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 430 or PY 403; MA 301 

The object of this course is to introduce the student to the microscopic 
phenomena responsible for the operation of solid state electronic devices. A 
qualitative description of the band model of solids is followed by a descrip- 
tion of the transport properties of charge carriers. P-n junction diodes and 



98 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

transistors, solar cells, controlled rectifiers, tunnel diodes, and unijunction 
transistors are treated along with more recently developed devices. 

Mr. Lade. 

EE 533. Transistor Circuits 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 302, EE 314, B Average in EE and MA 
A study of the application of transistors to linear and switching circuitry. 
The electrical response of such systems is considered in the light of certain 
physical characteristics of the transistor, in addition to the piecewise linear 
model. Device characteristics, temperature stability, cascaded amplifiers, and 
elementary switching circuits are treated. Mr. Manning. 

EE 591, EE 592. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering 3-3 

Prerequisite: B Average in Technical Subjects 

A two-semester sequence to develop new courses, and to allow qualified 

students to explore unusual areas. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EE 611, EE 612. Electric Network Synthesis 3-3 

Prerequisite: EE 504 

A study of modern network theory, with the emphasis on synthesis of both 
passive and active networks based on the work of Brune, Bode, Guillemin, 
Bott and Duffin, Darlington, Foster, Linville and many others. Both the 
realization problem and the approximation problem will be treated. 

Mr. Hoadley. 

EE 613. Advanced Feedback Control 3-0 

Prerequisite: EE 516 

An advanced study of feedback systems for the control of physical variables. 
Analysis of follower systems and regulators, mathematical and graphical 
description of systems. Stability theory and performance criteria. Frequency 
response and root locus methods of analysis. System compensation and 
design. Synthesis of linear systems. Introductory analysis of non-linear 
systems. Mr. Peterson. 

EE 615. Electromagnetic Waves 4-0 

Prerequisite: EE 507 

Maxwell's equations applied to a study of the propagation of energy by 
electromagnetic waves. Vector and scalar retarded potentials, propagation 
in free space and material media, guided electromagnetic waves, common 
waveguides, skin effects, resonant cavities. Microwave network theory applied 
to measurement problems. Messrs. Barclay, Itoh. 

EE 616. Microwave Electronics 0-4 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Frequency limitations of conventional electron tubes. Microwave power 
generation and control by interaction of electromagnetic fields with charged 
particles and molecular energy levels, and by non-linear reactances. Appli- 
cations in klystrons, magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, masers, and reactance 
amplifiers. Measurement problems and techniques in microwave region. 

Mr. Barclay. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 99 

EE 617. Pulse, Switching, and Timing Circuits 3-0 

Prerequisites: EE 503, EE 512 

Tube and transistor circuit techniques for the production, shaping, and 
control of nonsinusoidal wave forms. Fundamental circuits needed in pulse 
information systems, instrumentation, and computers. Mr. Barclay. 

EE 618. Antennas and Propagation 0-4 

Prerequisite: EE 615 

Electromagnetic wave theory applied to antennas and antenna arrays with 
emphasis on microwave frequencies. Calculation and measurement of direc- 
tional characteristics, gain, field intensity, propagation via the ionosphere 
over various terrains, obstacle gain, gain height theory, forward scatter and 
other topics. Mr. Itoh. 

EE 623. Electronic Properties of Solid State Materials 3-0 

Prerequisite: EE 551 or PY 552 

A study of the electronic properties of solids. Consideration of the motion 
of electrons in periodic potentials leads directly to the study of the band 
theory and its consequences on the electrical and magnetic properties of 
materials. Beginning with the Boltzmann transport equations a phenomeno- 
logical description of charge carrier flow is developed in terms of an effec- 
tive mass tensor. Hot electron transport, radiative transition mechanisms 
and high field effects will be treated in some depth. Mr. Lade. 

EE 624. Electronic Properties of Solid State Devices 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 623 

A study, in detail of the terminal properties of a large class of solid state 
devices. Boundary relationships at solid-state interfaces will be considered 
in considerable depth along with the determination of added carrier profiles 
in neutral and non-neutral bulk regions. The role of deep lying traps on 
device performance will be treated as an introduction to a class of space- 
charge-limited devices. The present technology of device fabrication will 
be discussed and demonstrated. Mr. Lade. 

EE 641. Advanced Digital Computer Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: EE 520 

A study of the circuits and components of modern digital computers, includ- 
ing basic logic systems, codes, advanced systems of circuit logic, vacuum 
tube, transistor, and magnetic components. Memory devices, counters, con- 
verters, adders, accumulators, inputs, outputs, and computer control systems 
will be analyzed. Mr. Bell. 

EE 642. Automata and Adaptive Systems 3-0 

Prerequisite: EE 520 

The study of neural nets in natural systems, artificial nerve nets, pattern- 
recognition devices, artificial intelligence, goal-directed behavior, self- 
repairing machines, the logic of automata, and adaptive Boolean logic. 

Mr. Bell. 

EE 643. Advanced Electrical Measurements 0-3 

Prerequisites: EE 503, EE 431 

A critical analysis of circuits used in electrical measurements, with special 
attention to such topics as balance convergence, effects of strays, sensitivity, 
the use of feedback in electronic devices, automatic measuring systems, and 
digital measuring systems. Mr. Hoadley. 



100 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EE 645, EE 646. Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 3-3 

Prerequisites: EE 615 or PY 503, MA 512 

A comprehensive study of electromagnetic theory with emphasis on field 
theory applications. Charges in both uniform and accelerated motion, field 
equivalence principles, anisopropic media, ferrite media, variational methods 
for waveguide discontinuities, periodic structures including Floquet's theo- 
rem, integral transform and function-theoretical techniques, solid state theory 
applied to quantum electronic devices. Mr. Itoh. 

EE 691, EE 692. Special Studies in Electrical Engineering 3-3 

This course provides an opportunity for small groups of advanced graduate 
students to study, under the direction of qualified members of the profes- 
sional staff, advanced topics in their special fields of interest. 

Graduate Staff. 

EE 695. Electrical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in EE 

A series of papers and conferences participated in by the instructional staff, 

invited guests, and students who are candidates for advanced degrees. 

Mr. Eckels. 

EE 699. Electrical Engineering Research Credits By Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in EE, and Approval of Adviser. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Patrick Hill McDonald, Jr., Head, *Robert Alden Douglas, 

Adolphus Mitchell 
Associate Professors: John Edward Griffith, Graduate Administrator, Daniel 

Shou-Ling Wang 
Assistant Professors: John Auert Edwards, John Frederick Ely, Edward D. 

GURLEY 

Affiliated Graduate Faculty 

Associate Professors: Frederick Otto Smetana, James Clifford Williams, 

James T. Yen, Paul Zung Teh Zia, Carl Frank Zorowski 
Assistant Professor: Michael Amein 

The faculty of the Department of Engineering Mechanics offers a broad 
range of graduate courses both for its own students seeking advanced de- 
grees and for inclusion in the graduate programs of students in allied areas 
of engineering and in the physical and mathematical sciences. 

Graduate studies in Engineering Mechanics embrace four broad areas; 
namely, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, continuum mechanics, and dynam- 
ics. Each of these areas is of considerable importance in current research, 
to the extent that professional demands in these areas by space-related in- 
dustry and governmental agencies is second only to those for the electronics 
specialties. Professional interests of the faculty are represented by courses de- 
voted to the clastic and plastic behavior of solids, viscous and compressible 

* On leave, 1 964-66 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 101 

fluid flow, the generalized behavior of matter when described as a continuum, 
and in sequences devoted to the theory of periodic and aperiodic vibrations 
and to space mechanics. 

Courses for individual programs may be chosen rather broadly from the 
listings indicated, and special attention is directed to the reservoir of courses 
appropriate to mechanics studies, selected from closely allied engineering 
specialties. Beginning graduate students ordinarily will choose a program 
to encompass several of the major areas, thus establishing a broad base for 
subsequent studies at the advanced graduate level which usually are concen- 
trated about one particular area of research. 

Graduate research in mechanics in any of the four major areas outlined 
may follow the lines of either analytical or experimental investigations. The 
development of new research techniques for both types of endeavors is of 
prime concern to the field of mechanics and the laboratory complex of Engi- 
neering Mechanics now includes four research laboratories. One of these is 
equipped for the study of fluid behavior of liquid metals, another for 
dynamic studies in viscoelasticity, still a third for research in fracture me- 
chanics, and the fourth for static and dynamic studies in stress concentra- 
tion. Whether a student is inclined toward analytical or toward experimental 
investigations, he ordinarily will gain experience in both types of endeavor 
prior to his independent research activities. 

The faculty of Engineering Mechanics has submitted, for administrative 
approval, a proposal for a doctoral program to be inaugurated in July, 1964. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EM 501, EM 502. Continuum Mechanics I, II 3-3 

Prerequisites: EM 301, EM 303, ME 301, MA 405 

The concepts of stress and strain are presented in generalized tensor form. 
Emphasis is placed on the discussion and relative comparison of the analyti- 
cal models for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular, and porous media. 
The underlying thermodynamic principles are presented, the associated 
boundary value problems are formulated and selected examples are used to 
illustrate the theory. Mr. Griffith. 

EM 503. Theory of Linear Elasticity 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 301 

The equations describing the linear elastic solid are used to illustrate the 
development of analytical models used to predict the behavior of solids. 
Studies in instability, wave propagation, thermal stresses, and fracture me- 
chanics illustrate the viewpoints employed for varied physical phenomena. 

Mr. Douglas. 

EM 504. Mechanics of Ideal Fluids 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 430 or EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 513 

Basic equations of ideal fluid flow; potential and stream functions; vortex 
dynamics; body forces due to flow fields; methods of singularities in two- 
dimensional bows; analytical determination of potential functions: con- 
formal transformations; free-streamline flows. Messrs. Amein, Edwards. 



102 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EM 505. Mechanics of Viscous Fluids I 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 430 or EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 532 

Equations of motion of a viscous fluid (Navier-Stokes Equations); general 
properties of the Navier-Stokes equations; some exact solutions of the 
Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layer equations; some approximate meth- 
ods of solution of the boundary layer equations; laminar boundary layers 
in axi-symmetric and three-dimensional flows; unsteady laminar boundary 
layers. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate years.) 

Messrs. Amein, Edwards. 

EM 506. Mechanics of Compressible Fluids I 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 430 or EM 304, ME 302 

Corequisite: MA 532 

Introduction to compressible fluid flow; isentropic, one-dimensional flow; 

Rayleigh and Fanno line flows; generalized one-dimensional flow; normal 

shock waves; introduction to multi-dimensional, compressible flow. (Offered 

in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Messrs. Edwards, Yen. 

EM 509. Space Mechanics I 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 302, EM 304 
Corequisite: MA 511 

The application of mechanics to the analysis and design of orbits and 
trajectories. Trajectory computation and optimization; space maneuvers; re- 
entry trajectories; interplanetary guidance. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate 
years.) Mr. Clayton. 

EM 510. Space Mechanics II 0-3 

Prerequisites: EM 509, MA 511 

Continuation of EM 509. The analysis and design of guidance systems. Basic 
sensing devices; the characteristics of an inertial space; the theory of stabi- 
lized platforms; terrestrial inertial guidance. (Offered in 1964-65 and alter- 
nate years.) Mr. Clayton. 

EM 511. Theory of Plates and Shells 3-0 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 441 

Bending theory of thin plates; geometry of surfaces and stresses in shells. 
Various methods of analysis are discussed and illustrated by problems of 
practical interest. Messrs. Ely, Wang. 

EM 551. Advanced Strength of Materials 3-0 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

Stresses and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concen- 
tration and fatigue; plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved beams; pre- 
stress energy methods; shear deflections; buckling problems and column 
design; and membrane stresses in shells. Mr. Mitchell. 

EM 552. Elastic Stability 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 301, MA 405, EM 551 

A study of elastic and plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determi- 
nant. The energy method and the theorem of stationary potential energy. 
The solution of buckling problems by finite differences and the calculus of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 103 

variations. The application of successive approximations to stability prob- 
lems. Optimization applied to problems of aeroelastic and civil engineering 
structures. Messrs. Mitchell, Zia. 

EM 555. Dynamics I 0-3 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405 

The theory of vibrations from the Lagrangian formulation of the equations 
of motion. Free and forced vibrations with and without damping, multiple 
degrees of freedom, coupled motion, normal mode vibrations, wave propaga- 
tion in solid bodies. (Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Clayton. 

EM 556. Dynamics II 0-3 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405 

The dynamics of particles and rigid bodies by the use of formulations of 
the laws of mechanics due to Newton, Euler, Lagrange, and Hamilton. 
Accelerated reference frames, constraints, Euler's angles, the spinning top, 
the gyroscope, precession, stability, phase space, and nonlinear oscillatory 
motion. (Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Mr. Clayton. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

EM 601, EM 602. Unifying Concepts in Mechanics I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 601 

Generalized treatment of the fundamental equations and boundary value 
problems of continuous and non-continuous media. Use is made of con- 
temporary developments in irreversible thermodynamics, statistical me- 
chanics, and electrodynamics to provide a unified foundation for the devel- 
opment of principles governing the dynamic and thermodynamic behavior 
of elastic, plastic and visco-elastic solids, viscous fluids and rheological media. 
(Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) Messrs. Griffith, McDonald. 

EM 604. Theory of Plasticity 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 503 

Analytical models are developed to represent the behavior of deformable 
solids in the plastic regime. Conditions of yielding and fracture which 
initiate and terminate plastic behavior are studied, with the special stress- 
strain relationships necessary in plasticity. The hyperbolic equations and 
slip-line fields characteristic of plane strain theory are developed. 

Messrs. Douglas, Zorowski. 

EM 611. Mechanics of Compressible Fluids II 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 506 

Continuation of EM 506; linearized theory of two-dimensional flow; method 
of characteristics for two-dimensional supersonic flow; oblique shock waves; 
unsteady one-dimensional flow; shock-wave boundary layer interactions; 
transonic flow. (Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) 

Messrs. Edwards, Smetana. 

EM 612. Mechanics of Viscous Fluids II 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 505 

Continuation of EM 505; phenomenological theories of turbulence; turbu- 
lent flow in ducts and pipes; turbulent boundary layer with and without 



104 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

pressure gradient; compressible boundary layer; boundary layer control; 
free viscous flow. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate years.) 

Messrs. Amein, Williams. 

EM 695. Experimental Methods in Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

The study of specialized experimental techniques utilized in contemporary 

research in the areas of Mechanics. Messrs. Douglas, Edwards, McDonald. 

EM 697. Seminars in Mechanics 1 to 3-1 to 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Adviser 

The discussion and development of theory relating to contemporary research 

in the frontier areas of Mechanics. Mr. McDonald. 

EM 698. Special Topics in Mechanics 3 to 9 

The study, by small groups of graduate students under the direction of 
members of the faculty, of topics of particular interest in various advanced 
phases of Mechanics. Graduate Staff. 

EM 699. Research in Mechanics 3 to 6 

Individual research in the field of Mechanics. Graduate Staff. 

Courses in Allied Areas 

CHE 551 Thermal Problems in Nuclear Engineering 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels 

CE 525, CE 526 Advanced Structural Analysis I, II 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design 

CE 535 Ultimate Strength Theory and Design 

CE 547 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics 

EE 506 Dynamical Analogies 

MA 555 (PY 555) Principles of Astrodynamics 

ME 515 Experimental Stress Analysis 

ME 516 Photoelasticity 

ME 521 Aerothermodynamics 

ME 541, ME 542 Aerodynamic Heating 

ME 554 Advanced Aerodynamic Theory 

ME 581, ME 582 Hypersonic Aerodynamics 

MIM 561 Advanced Structure and Properties of Materials 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates 

CE 625, CE 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II 

CE 627 Design of Blast Resistant Structures 

CE 641, CE 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics 

CE 643 Hydraulics of Ground Water 

MIC 605, MIC 606 Crystal Structures 

MA 605 Non-Linear Differential Equations 

MA 632, MA 633 Operational Mathematics I, II 

MA 661, MA 662 Tensor Analysis I, II 

ME 606 Advanced Gas Dynamics 

ME 611, ME 612 Advanced Machine Design I, II 

ME 613 Mechanics of Machinery 

ME 614 Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations 

ME 615, ME 616 Aeroelasticity I, II 

ME 617 Plates and Shells in Mechanical Design 

ME 652 Dynamics of Compressible Flow 

ME 653 Supersonic Aerodynamics 

ME 654 Dynamics of Viscous Fluids 

ME 660 Aero-Mechanical Engineering Problems 

MIM 651, MIM 652 Theory and Structure of Metals 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 105 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Head, Charles H. Brett, Frank Edwin 
Guthrie, Robert Lamar Rabb, David Allen Young, Jr. 

Professor Emeritus: Theodore Bertis Mitchell 

Visiting Professor: Wesley Gordon Bruce 

Associate Professors: William V. Campbell, Maurice H. Farrier, Ernest 
Hodgson, Alexander Russell Main, Walter Joseph Mistric, Jr., Herbert 
H. Neunzig 

Assistant Professors: Richard Charles Axtell, Walter Carl Dauterman 

The Department of Entomology offers graduate work leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The work in entomology 
is well supported by strong departments in chemistry, statistics, and the 
biological and plant and animal sciences. 

Excellent facilities for advanced study and research are provided in a 
modern building designed for the use of the biological sciences. Equip- 
ment includes modern greenhouses, air-conditioned laboratories with pre- 
cision temperature and humidity control, spray chambers, dust towers, low 
temperature rooms, and pesticide residue laboratories. Facilities are pro- 
vided to support research in insect toxicology, insect physiology, insect bio- 
chemistry, biology, ecology, and taxonomy. 

The well-trained faculty teaches the specialized courses in the various 
phases of advanced entomological work. 

Opportunities for employment of well-trained entomologists are plentiful 
and varied. Research and teaching opportunities exist in many State institu- 
tions. Federal agencies offer positions in control, research, and regulatory 
work. Private industry is using more and more entomologists in the develop- 
ment, production, control testing and sale of agricultural chemicals. Jobs as 
consultants in domestic or foreign service as well as in private business and 
sales are available. Also, a person can go into business for himself as a pest 
control operator or as an insecticide formulator. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ENT 401. Literature of Biology 1-0 

Prerequisite: Enrollment as upper-classman, undergraduate, or graduate 
A general course intended to acquaint students with literature problems of 
the scientist, mechanics of the library book classifications, bibliographies, ab- 
stract journals, taxonomic indexes, and preparation of scientific papers in 
agriculture, forestry, biology and their sub-divisions. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ENT 502. Fundamentals of Entomology A 5-0 

Prerequisites: Twelve Hours of Biology; ENT 301 or ENT 312 or Equivalent 
An intensive treatment of the general external morphology of insects and 
a survey of the adults and immatures of the orders and principal families 
of insects with attention to their biology. Messrs. Neunzig, Rabb, Young. 



106 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENT 503. Fundamentals of Entomology B 0-5 

Prerequisites: Twelve Hours of Biology; Nine Hours of Chemistry; ENT 301 

or Equivalent 

Structure and morphological variations of organ systems in insects including 
considerations of their histology and function. Sensory physiology and be- 
havior will then lead into the basic elements of insect ecology. 

Messrs. Campbell, Hodgson, Rabb, Young. 

ENT 504. Insect Morphology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 502 

Concerned with external morphology, primary and comparative phases, with 
emphasis on knowledge and techniques which can be applied to specific 
problems. (Offered 1963-64 and fall of alternate years.) Mr. Young. 

ENT 511. Systematic Entomology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or Equivalent 

A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, designed 
to acquaint the student with those groups and develop in the student some 
ability in the use of keys, descriptions, etc. (Offered 1964-65 and fall of 
alternate years.) Mr. Young. 

ENT 531. Insect Ecology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or Equivalent 

The environmental relations of insects, including insect development, 
habits, distribution and abundance. (Offered 1963-64 and fall of alternate 
years.) Mr. Rabb. 

ENT 541. Immature Insects 2-0 

Prerequisite: ENT 502 or Permission of Instructor 

An advanced study of the immature stages of selected orders of insects with 
emphasis on generic and specific taxa. Primary consideration is given to 
the larval stage, but a brief treatment of eggs and pupae is also included. 
(Offered 1964-65 and fall of alternate years.) Messrs. Neunzig, Rabb. 

ENT 551. Fundamentals of Insect Control 3-0 

Prerequisites: ENT 312 or Equivalent; Twelve Hours of Chemistry; Twelve 
Hours of Biology 

The course is divided into two phases. The first deals with the basic causes 
of insect problems, an evaluation of the biological and economic aspects 
of insect attack, and the fundamental methods employed in insect control. 
The second part deals with the critical chemical, physical, and biological 
properties of compounds used for insect control. The material presented 
in the course is directed toward obtaining fundamental knowledge of the 
scientific principles underlying modern methods of protection of food, cloth- 
ing, shelter, and health from anthropods. Mr. Guthrie. 

ENT 552. Applied Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisites: ENT 502, ENT 503, ENT 551 

A course dealing with the organization of the field of applied entomology, 
the significance of other disciplines, research and extension methods, the 
concept of integrated control, and the solution of economic problems. (Of- 
fered 1963-64 and spring of alternate years.) Mr. Mistric. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 107 

ENT 572. Forest Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of the methods of identification of forest pests, the factors governing 
their abundance, habits and control. (Offered 1964-65 and spring of alter- 
nate years.) Mr. Farrier. 

ENT 582. (ZO 582) Medical and Veterinary Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic anthropods 
of man, domestic and wild animals. (Offered 1963-64 and spring of alter- 
nate years.) Messrs. Farrier, Harkema. 

ENT 590. Special Problems Credits By Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of the Instructor 
Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a thesis 
problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff. 

ENT 592. Acorology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or ZO 103 

A systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, 
biology and control of the more common and economic forms attacking 
material, plants and animals including man. (Offered 1961-65 and spring 
of alternate years.) Mr. Farrier. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ENT 602. Principles of Taxonomy 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 511 

A course introducing the methods and tools used in animal taxonomy, 
designed to promote a better understanding of taxonomic literature, and 
provide a foundation for taxonomic research. (Offered 1964-65 and spring 
of alternate years.) Mr. Young. 

ENT 611. Biochemistry of Insects 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 551 or Permission of Instructor 

The biochemistry of insects will be considered with primary emphasis on 
intermediate metabolism. Aspects in which insects show specialization will 
be treated in greater detail. The comparative treatment used necessitates 
some consideration of other animal groups. (Offered 1964-65 and fall of 
alternate years.) Mr. Hodgson. 

ENT 622. Insect Toxicology 0-3 

Prerequisites: ENT 551, CH 551 or Equivalent 

The relation of chemical structure to insect toxicity, the mode of action of 
toxicants used to kill insects, the metabolism of insecticides in plant and 
animal systems, the selectivity within the cholinesterase inhibitors and other 
selective mechanisms, and the analysis of insecticide residues will be dis- 
cussed. (Offered 1965-66 and spring of alternate years.) 

Messrs. Dauterman, Guthrie. 

ENT 690. Seminar LI 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Entomology or Closely Allied Fields 
Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned by Seminar Chair- 
man. Graduate Staff. 



108 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENT 699. Research Credits By Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Entomology or Closely Allied Fields 
Original research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: David Dickenson Mason, Head, Richard Loree Anderson, Grad- 
uate Administrator, Columbus Clark Cockerham, Arnold Herbert Ed- 
ward Grandage, Robert John Hader, Don William Hayne, Henry 
Laurence Lucas, Jr., Francis Edward McVay, Robert James Monroe, 
Jackson Ashcraft Rigney, Ralph Winston Stacy, Robert Douglas Steel, 
Hubertus Robert van der Vaart, Oscar Wesler 

Professor Emeritus: Gertrude Mary Cox 

Adjunct Professors: William Stokes Connor, Alva Leroy Finkler, Walter 
Anton Hendricks, Daniel Goodman Horvitz 

Associate Professors: William Jackson Hall, Roger Gene Petersen, 
Charles Harry Proctor, John Oren Rawlings, William Wesley Garry 
Smart, Jr., Thomas Dudley Wallace 

Visiting Associate Professor: John Clement Koop 

Adjunct Associate Professor: William Alexander Glenn 

Assistant Professors: Bibhuti Bhushan Bhattacharyya, Laurence Jay 
Herbst 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Sidney Addelman 

The Department of Experimental Statistics offers work leading to the 
Master of Science, Master of Experimental Statistics (non-thesis) , and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This department has a working arrangement 
with the Department of Biostatistics in the University of North Carolina's 
School of Public Health at Chapel Hill, whereby the graduate students can 
major in experimental statistics and minor in the Division of Health 
Affairs. The Department of Experimental Statistics maintains a close liaison 
with the Department of (Mathematical) Statistics at Chapel Hill in order 
to strengthen the offerings in statistical theory. (See University of North 
Carolina courses listed below.) Introductory courses in the three depart- 
ments are coordinated so that it is easy for a beginning statistics graduate 
student to transfer from one institution of the Consolidated University to 
another. The three departments are affiliated with the Institute of Statistics 
(See page 15). Some Ph.D. theses in experimental statistics are directed 
by members of the graduate faculty of the two statistics departments at 
Chapel Hill. 

Members of the department conduct research in statistical theory, tech- 
niques of design and analysis for surveys and experiments, econometrics, 
time series and spectral analysis and computational methods. At least one 
staff member consults with researchers in each of the following fields and 
conducts his own research on statistical problems which are encountered: 
the various agricultural sciences, quantitative genetics, wildlife science 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 109 

(game and fish), industrial development and engineering, physical sciences, 
and social sciences and economics. 

A graduate student who majors in experimental statistics may specialize 
in any one of these fields with his minor in the associated department; or 
with a strong mathematical background he may prefer to minor in mathema- 
tics or mathematical statistics. For the graduate student who wishes to minor 
in statistics, the department has developed a curriculum tailored to his needs. 
Many employers are offering added inducements for research personnel who 
have such a minor. The department cooperates with other graduate depart- 
ments in order to provide the type of courses needed for their students and 
to provide a staff to participate in their graduate programs. 

A program of training in biomathematics at the doctoral and postdoctoral 
levels recently has been initiated in the Department of Experimental Sta- 
tistics. This program requires that the student become well-grounded in 
four areas— mathematics, statistics, physical science, and some phase of 
biology. Several assistantships are available for doctoral students and several 
fellowships for post-doctorals. Mathematical biology and related areas are 
now developing rapidly and there is much opportunity for properly trained 
people. 

In addition to its consulting services, the department provides computer 
programming and other assistance to the Agricultural Experiment Station 
staff in close cooperation with the campus Computing Center. This work 
is currently augmented by a computer facility grant from the National 
Institutes of Health. The department also provides a desk calculator com- 
puting service for sets of data not economical to program for the digital 
computer. It furnishes several federal agencies, other states and private 
concerns with research and consulting services on a contract basis. This work 
supplies live problems on which graduate students may acquire experience 
and maturity. 

The Department of Experimental Statistics is located in a new building 
convenient to classroom and central library facilities. Ample space for 
graduate students is provided adjacent to faculty offices. A well-equipped 
desk computing laboratory is conveniently located in the graduate student 
area. Plans have been made for a departmental library facility, which, to- 
gether with reprint files of several faculty members, will provide even 
easier access to the main periodicals and reference books. 

The Computing Center currently has an IBM 1410 digital computer with 
adequate peripheral equipment. The department has, jointly with the De- 
partment of Agricultural Economics, an IBM 1620 computer. Both of the 
computers are available for use in connection with computer programming 
courses and graduate student research problems. 

The department has approximately twenty graduate assistantships at 
stipends adjusted to the previous training and experience of the recipients. 
Students who have a major in an applied field and who have a minimum 
of one year of calculus, or students who have a major in statistics or mathe- 
matics are encouraged to apply for these assistantships. Students who have 
no advanced calculus or matrix algebra are advised to make arrangements 
to take these courses in the summer previous to entrance in the graduate 
program. If a graduate assistant has a satisfactory course record, he can 



110 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

complete the requirements for the master's degree in two years (in less time 
if he takes courses during the summer) . A graduate assistant with a master's 
degree in statistics can complete the requirements for the doctorate in two 
years. 

Most fields of research, development, production, and distribution are 
seeking persons trained in statistical theory and methods. The demand is 
equally strong from universities, agricultural and engineering experimental 
stations, national defense agencies, other federal agencies, and a wide 
variety of industrial concerns. There is a need for experimental statisticians 
with the master's degree as well as for those with the doctorate. 

At the request of the Southern Regional Education Board's Advisory 
Commission on Statistics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Oklahoma State 
University, the University of Florida, and North Carolina State have joined 
in a continuing program of graduate summer sessions in statistics, held at 
the four institutions in rotation. In 1964, the host institution is the Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute, followed by the University of Florida and Oklahoma 
State Unversity. Each of the sponsoring institutions will accept the credits 
earned by students in the summer sessions as residence credit. The courses 
are arranged to provide consecutive work in successive summers. Informa- 
tion regarding these courses may be obtained from any of the cooperating 
statistical departments or the deans of the Graduate Schools. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ST 421, ST 422. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics 3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Elementary mathematical statistics primarily for students not intending to 
take further work in theoretical statistics. Includes introduction to prob- 
ability, common theoretical distributions, moments, moment generating func- 
tions, sampling distributions, (F, t, chi-square) , elementary estimation and 
hypothesis testing concepts, bivariate distributions, simple and multiple 
linear regression, analysis of variance, and elementary design of experi- 
ments. 



Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ST 501, ST 502. Basic Statistical Analysis 3-3 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or Equivalent or Graduate Standing 
Basic concepts of statistics; random variables, distributions, statistical meas- 
ures, estimation, tests of significance, analysis of variance, elementary design 
and sampling, factorial experiments, multiple regression, analysis of dis- 
crete data, and other topics. Intended primarily for statistics majors and 
Ph.D. minors and not intended as a service course for other departments. 

Mr. Steel. 

ST 511. Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I 3-3 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or Graduate Standing 

Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples; variation, statistical 

measures, distributions, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elemen- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 111 

tary experimental design, regression and correlation, chi-square. [Offered 
also in special summer sessions at Virginia Polytechnic Institute (1964) and 
University of Florida (1965).] Messrs. Monroe, Rawlings. 

ST 512. Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II 3-3 

Prerequisite: ST 511 or Equivalent 

Convariance, multiple regression, factorial experiments, individual degrees 
of freedom, incomplete block designs, experiments repeated over space and 
time. [Offered also in special summer session at Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute (1964) and University of Florida (1965) .] Messrs. Mason, Monroe. 

ST 513. Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences I 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 311 or Graduate Standing 

Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. Variability of sample data, 
distributions, confidence limits, chi-square, t-test, analysis of variance, re- 
gression, correlation, experimental designs. Mr. McVay. 

ST 514. Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 513 or Equivalent 

Extension of basic statistical concepts to social experiments and surveys; 
sampling from finite populations and estimating using unrestricted, strati- 
fied, systematic, and multistage selections; analysis of variance continued; 
multiple regression; covariance; experimental designs. Mr. Proctor. 

ST 515, ST 516. Experimental Statistics for Engineers 3-3 

Prerequisite: ST 361 or Graduate Standing 

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in 
engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability, distributions, meas- 
urement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of significance, 
analysis of variance, enumeration data, sensitivity data, and experimental 
design. (Offered also in regular summer session.) Mr. Hader. 

ST 531. (BS 531) Bio mathematics I 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 301, MA 405, or Consent of Instructor 
Linear time-invariant operators and their Laplace transforms, with a dis- 
cussion of homogeneous and non-homogeneous linear differential equations 
and their analysis in time-domain and frequency-domain; applications to 
the study of input and output in biological systems; systems of linear and 
non-linear differential equations and their perturbation equations, especially 
with reference to the study of population dynamics and growth processes, 
stability of biological systems, and tracer kinetics. Mr. van der Vaart. 

ST 532. (BS 532) Biomothematics II 0-3 

Prerequisites: ST 531, ST 541 (MA 541), or Consent of Instructor 
Continuation of topics in ST 531. The general framework for mathematiza- 
tion of biological problems; deterministic and stochastic models; birth and 
death processes with applications to physiology and population dynamics; 
desirable features of mathematical models in biology. 

Mr. van der Vaart. 

ST 541. (See MA 541. Theory of Probability I.) 
ST 542. (See MA 542. Theory of Probability II.) 



112 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ST 551. Basic Statistical Inference 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 441, ST 541 (MA 541) 

Frequency distributions and moments; sampling distributions; introductory 
theory of point and interval estimation; tests of hypotheses. [Offered also in 
special summer sessions at Virginia Polytechnic Institute (1964) and Uni- 
versity of Florida (1965).] Mr. Grandage. 

ST 552. Basic Theory of Least Squares and Variance Components 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 551, MA 405 

Theory of least squares; multiple regression; analysis of variance and covari- 
ance; experimental design models; factorial experiments; variance com- 
ponent models. [Offered also in special summer sessions at Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute (1964) and University of Florida (1965).] 

Mr. Anderson. 

ST 591. Special Problems 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Development of techniques for specialized cases, particularly in connection 
with thesis and practical consulting problems. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 111. Methods of Mathematical Statistics I 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Introductory treatment of special mathematical techniques of particular 
importance in probability and statistics, including topics from combinatorial 
mathematics, Fourier and Laplace transforms, contour integration, special 
inequalities and finite differences. Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 131. Elementary Probability Theory 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Fundamentals of probability theory and distribution theory essential for the 
study of mathematical statistics, including: axiomatic treatment of prob- 
ability models, combinatorial probability, conditional probability and inde- 
pendence, random variables, distribution and density functions, moments 
and generating functions, combined random variables. 

Messrs. Hall, Johnson. 

U.N.C. ST 132. Intermediate Probability 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 131 or ST 134 

Laws of large numbers, characteristic functions, and central limit theorems. 
Elements of stochastic processes and their applications, including random 
walks, Markov chains, recurrent events, Brownian motion, and elementary 
queueing theory. Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 133. Least Squares and Times Series 3-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 134; Matrix Algebra 

The classical method of least squares with modern improvements and 
developments. Interpretations of the results in terms of probability. Appli- 
cations to social and to natural sciences. The problem of observations or- 
dered in time. Correlation and regression of time series. Seasonal variation 
and secular trends. Mediods of correcting for lack of independence and of 
avoiding fallacies. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 134. Statistical Theory I 5-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

U.N.C. ST 131 plus regression and correlation theory, convergence and 
approximation, common distributions, functions of random samples, multi- 
normal theory, and random normal sampling. Messrs. Hall, Johnson. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 113 

U.N.C. ST 135. Statistical Theory II 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 131 or ST 134 

Fundamentals of statistical inference and statistical decision theory, includ- 
ing: the decision and inference problem, sufficient statistics, point estimation 
(unbiasedness, Bayes and minimax methods, maximum likelihood and 
large sample theory) , hypothesis testing, interval estimation, chi-square 
tests, and introduction to nonparametric, Bayesian, and sequential methods. 
Linear estimation, analysis of variance and regression are largely excluded. 

Messrs. Hall, Johnson. 

U.N.C. ST 144. Correlation, Contingency, and Chi Tests 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 
Corequisite: Matrix Algebra 

Elements of the theory of testing composite hypotheses. Multivariate normal 
populations; total, partial, and multiple correlations. Singular multivariate 
distributions. Tests of independence, homogeneity, and goodness-of-fit. 
Contingency tables; exact tests for independence and the chi approxima- 
tion. Many-dimensional contingency tests. Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 150. Analysis of Variance with Application to 

Experimental Designs 0-3 

Corequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 

Linear estimation. Non-estimability. The best linear estimate and its vari- 
ance. The Gauss-Markov theorem. Sums of squares. Analysis of variance and 
the generalized t and F tests. Unified mathematical theory of the intrablock 
analysis of incomplete block designs. Applications to balanced, lattice, par- 
tially balanced and Latin square designs. Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 182 Mathematical Economics 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 
Corequisite: Matrix Algebra 

Perfect and imperfect competition. Monopoly. Utility vs. ranking of prefer- 
ences. Relations between commodities. General equilibrium. Effects of taxes 
and controls of various kinds. Index numbers. Welfare economics. (Offered 
in fall of 1964-1965 and alternate years.) Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 183. Advanced Mathematical Economics 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 182, Differential Equations 

Dynamic variations in the economy. Calculus of variations and stochastic 
process theory with applications to economic problems. Valuation, deprecia- 
tion, and depletion. Most profitable rates of exploitation of mineral and 
biological resources. (Offered in spring of 1964-1965 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 197. Population Statistics 0-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

Training in techniques for quantitative research with population data, com- 
position characteristics, making of population estimates, computation and 
standardization of birth and death rates, construction and application of life 
tables, measurement of migration. Mr. Price. 



114 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ST 611, ST 612. Intermediate Statistical Theory 3-3 

Prerequisites: ST 551, MA 512, MA 405 

This course will provide the additional theory, above that of ST 551, needed 
for many advanced theory courses. Many of the topics of ST 551 will be 
developed more rigorously, with more attention paid to mathematical 
aspects. Advanced probability theory; limit theorems, distribution theory, 
multinomial distributions. Statistical decision theory, theory of estimation, 
confidence regions, theory of tests of hypotheses, sequential tests, non- 
parametric methods. Mr. Bhattacharyya. 

ST 613. Time Series Analysis I 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 552 

Statistical analysis of realizations of second order stationary random pro- 
cesses, and mathematical specifications of the underlying processes, with 
emphasis throughout on the spectrum. Discussions of applications are given 
to illustrate the theory and methods. Topics include second order stationary 
parent sequences, correlation analysis, autoregressive series, moving averages, 
hidden periodicities models, spectral analysis, estimation of the correlogram 
and the coefficients of autoregressive schemes, the periodogram, estimation 
of the spectral density; serial correlation theory, goodness-of-fit tests. 

Mr. Herbst. 

ST 614. Time Series Analysis II 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 613, ST 542 (MA 542) 

Cross-covariance analysis of two time series, cross-spectral analysis of two 
time series, estimation of co-spectral density, quadrature-spectral density, 
coherence and phase, interpretations and applications of coherence analysis, 
detection and estimation of periodicities in variances of time series, spectral 
representation theory for second order stationary processes, further discus- 
sion of spectral estimation. Mr. Herbst. 

ST 621. Statistics in Animal Science 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or Equivalent 

Sources and magnitude of errors in experiments with animals, experimental 
designs and methods of analysis adapted to specific types of animal research, 
relative efficiency of alternate designs, amount of data required for specified 
accuracy, student reports on selected topics. (Offered in fall of 1965-1966 
and alternate years.) Mr. Lucas. 

ST 622. (See ANS 622. Principles of Biological Assays.) 

ST 623. Statistics in Plant Science 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 502 or Equivalent 

Principles and techniques of planning, establishing, and executing field and 
greenhouse experiments. Size, shape and orientation of plots; border effects; 
selection of experimental material; estimation of size of experiments for 
specified accuracy; scoring and subjective tests; subsampling plots and yields 
for laboratory analysis. Mr. Mason. 

ST 626. (GN 626) Statistical Concepts in Genetics 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 512 

Corequisite: ST 502 or Equivalent 

Factors bearing on rates of change in population means and variances, with 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 115 

special reference to cultivated plants and domestic animals; selection, in- 
breeding, magnitude and nature of genotypic and non-genotypic variability; 
experimental and statistical approaches in the analysis of quantitative in- 
heritance. Mr. Cockerham. 

ST 631. Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design 3-0 

Prerequisite: ST 422 or ST 502 or Equivalent 

Basic theory of sampling from a finite population. Confidence limits and 
estimation of optimum sample size, comparison of different sample designs, 
methods and probabilities for selection and methods of estimation, choice 
of a sampling unit, double sampling, matched samples. Mr. Proctor. 

ST 641. (See RS 641. Statistics in Sociology.) 
ST 651. (See AGC 651. Econometric Methods I.) 

ST 652. (AGC 652) Econometric Methods II 0-3 

Prerequisites: ST 422 or ST 552, MA 405 

Mathematical programming, theory of games. Applications of dynamic pro- 
gramming techniques and queueing theory to problems of inventory and 
replacement. Special topics in regression analysis. 

Messrs. Anderson, Bhattacharyya. 

ST 671. Advanced Topics in Least Squares and Variance Components 0-3 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or Equivalent, ST 552 

Use of non-balanced designs to estimate variance components; comparison 
of estimators; problems with finite populations. Least squares procedures 
for non-standard conditions; unequal variances, correlated errors, non- 
additivity, measurement errors, non-normality. Functional relationships. Fac- 
torial experiments with continuous factor levels; incomplete blocks. 

Mr. Anderson. 

ST 672. Special Advanced Topics in Statistical Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or Equivalent, ST 552 

Enumeration data; covariance; non-linear models; discriminant functions and 

other multivariate techniques. Mr. Monroe. 

ST 674. Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental Designs 

0-3 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or Equivalent, ST 552 

Interblock analysis of incomplete blocks designs, partially balanced designs, 
confounding, data collected at several places and times, multiple factor 
designs, change-over trails, analysis of groups of means. Mr. Addelman. 

ST 691. Advanced Special Problems 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or Equivalent, ST 552 

Any new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in lecture 
series as unique opportunities arise, including (a) theory of sampling applied 
to survey design and (b) analysis of linear models. 

Graduate Faculty, Visiting Professors. 

ST 694. Seminar 1-1 

A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any 
number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff. 

ST 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

A maximum of nine credits is allowed toward the Master of Science degree; 
no limitation on credits in doctorate programs. Graduate Staff. 



116 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

U.N.C. ST 200. Applied Multivariate Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 

Relations between multiple regression, analysis of variance, multivariate 
analysis and factor analysis. Tests with discriminant functions. The gener- 
alized Student ratio. Use of roots of determinantal equations. Classification 
problems. Distance and group constellations. (Offered in fall of 1964-1965 
and alternate years.) Mr. Nicholson. 

U.N.C. ST 202. Methods of Operations Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 

Linear programming, theory of games, techniques for analyzing waiting lines 
and queues. Applied probability, recent developments, applications of re- 
sults to specific problems. Case studies. Messrs. Nicholson, Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 204. Selected Techniques of Approximation 3-0 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

The methods of steepest descent and other methods of approximating inte- 
grals, with special attention to integrals occurring in probability and statis- 
tics. Asymptotic series. Large-sample approximations. Orthogonal poly- 
nomials and their applications to numerical quadrature, interpolation and 
moment problems. (Offered in fall of 1965-1966 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 212. Methods of Mathematical Statistics II 0-3 

Prerequisite: Advanced Calculus 

Measure and integration theory, with special reference to random variables, 
distribution functions, probability measures, and including Fubini's Theorem, 
the Radon-Nikodym Theorem, conditional probability, conditional expecta- 
tion, and modes of convergence. Messrs. Hall, Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 220. Theory of Estimation and Hypothesis Testing 4-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, ST 135, ST 212 

Bayes procedures for estimation and testing. Minimax procedures. Sufficient 
statistics. Optimal unbiased estimators. Most powerful similar tests. Admis- 
sibility. Invariance. Confidence sets. Large sample theory. 

Messrs. Hall, Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 221. Sequential Analysis 2-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, ST 135 

Hypothesis testing and estimation when the sample size depends on the 
observations. Sequential probability ratio tests. Sequential design of experi- 
ments. Stochastic approximation. Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 222. Nonparametric Inference 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, ST 135, ST 212 

Estimation and testing when the functional form of the population distri- 
bution is unknown. Rank and sign tests. Tests based on permutations of 
observations. Power of nonparametric tests. Optimum nonparametric tests 
and estimators. Nonparametric confidence intervals and tolerance limits. 

Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 231. Advanced Probability 3-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, ST 212 

Advanced theoretic course, including: random variables and expectations, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 117 

distributions and characteristic functions, infinitely divisible distributions, 
central limit theorems, laws of large numbers, and stable laws. (Offered in 
fall of 1964-1965 and alternate years.) Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 232. General Theory of Statistical Decision 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 135, ST 212 

Selected topics in the general theory of statistical decisions, based on the 
work of Abraham Wald. (Offered in spring of 1964-1965 and alternate 
years.) Mr. Hoeffding. 

U.N.C. ST 235. Stochastic Processes 0-3 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, ST 212 

Advanced theoretic course, including: separability of a process, processes 
with orthogonal random variables, Markov processes, martingales, and 
processes with independent increments. (Offered in spring of 1965-1966 and 
alternate years.) Mr. Smith. 

U.N.C. ST 237. Time Series Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 133 

Analysis of data involving trends, seasonal variations, cycles and serial cor- 
relations. Periodograms and correlograms. Exogenous and endogenous cycles. 
Stochastic difference equations. Tests for randomness. Distributions of serial 
correlation coefficients. The sinusoidal limit theorem. (Offered in spring of 
1965-1966 and alternate years.) Mr. Hotelling. 

U.N.C. ST 251. Combinatorial Problems of the Design of Experiments 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 150 

Application of Galois fields and two dimensional finite geometries to the 
construction of complete sets of orthogonal Latin squares. Finite hyperspace 
geometries and balanced incomplete block designs obtainable from them. 
Factorial designs. Theory of confounding. Construction and analysis of 
symmetrical factorial designs with confounding. Construction and analysis 
of symmetrical fractionally replicated designs. Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 252. Information Theory 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 132 

Corequisite: U.N.C. ST 212 

Transmission of information. Entropy. Simple message ensembles. Discrete 

sources. Transmission channels. Channel encoding and decoding. Encoding 

for binary symmetric channels. Encoding for discrete constant channels. 

(Offered in fall of 1965-1966 and alternate years.) Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 253. Error Correcting Codes 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 251 

Linear codes and their error correction capabilities. Some important linear 
codes. Linear switching circuits. Cyclic codes, Bose-Chaudhuri codes. Codes 
for burst error correction. Recurrent codes. Codes for checking arithmetic 
operations. (Offered in spring of 1965-1966 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 254. Special Topics in Design of Experiments I 3-0 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 150 

Response surface designs. Conditions for rotatibility. Construction and 

analysis of rotatable designs of the second and third order. Interblock 



118 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

analysis. General analysis of covariance. Missing plot techniques. (Offered in 
fall of 1964-1965 and alternate years.) Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 255. Special Topics in the Design of Experiments II 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 251 

Combinatorial properties and construction of balanced, group divisible and 
partially balanced designs. Impossibility proofs. Orthogonal Latin squares 
of non-prime power orders. Orthogonal arrays. Asymmetrical fractionally 
replicated designs. (Offered in spring of 1964-1965 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Bose. 

U.N.C. ST 260. Multivariate Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 135, Matrices 

Characterization and properties of a multivariate normal distribution, ran- 
dom samples from this distribution. Tests and confidence intervals related 
to the hypotheses of equality of two or more dispersion matrices against 
various types of alternatives. Multivariate analysis of variance, covariance 
and regression, under a linear model with fixed effects against various 
types of alternatives, and associated tests and confidence bounds. Associa- 
tion between subsets of a multivariate normal set, including several kinds 
of independence. Factor analysis. Mr. Roy. 

U.N.C. ST 261. Advanced Multivariate Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 260 

Distribution problems connected with the tests and confidence intervals 
discussed in U.N.C. ST 260. The properties, in terms of statistical inference, 
of the tests and confidence intervals against different classes of alternatives. 
Advanced multivariate analysis of variance under a linear model with 
random or mixed-type effects against various kinds of alternatives. Multi- 
variate designs for problems of MANOVA and for patterned dispersion 
matrices. Problems of classification. Some applications. Mr. Roy. 

U.N.C. ST 262. Multifactor Multiresponse Experiments with Response 

Not Necessarily Normal 3-0 

Corequisite: U.N.C. ST 260 

Unstructured and structured factors. Unstructured and structured responses 
based on a single or a product multinominal or hypergeometric distribution. 
Hypotheses against alternatives, analogous to those discussed in U.N.C. ST 
260 for the multivariate normal case. Large sample tests and the associated 
confidence intervals. One or more structured responses based on a con- 
tinuous c.d.f., and the appropriate hypotheses against alternatives in this 
situation. Exact and asymptotic tests. Mr. Roy. 

U.N.C. ST 263. Advanced Multifactor Multiresponse Experiments with 

Responses Not Necessarily Normal 0-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 262 

Properties, in terms of statistical inference, of the tests and confidence inter- 
vals discussed in U.N.C. ST 262. Generalization of univariate or multivariate 
analysis of variance to the case of normal error and random effects not 
necessarily normal. Design and analysis of factorial experiments with one 
or more normal response-types, treated as a problem in structured hypo- 
thesis. Relation to the classical design and analysis of factorial experiments 
and to those based on the response surface approach. Mr. Roy. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 119 

U.N.C. ST 300-301. Seminar in Statistical Literature 1-1 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 

Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 310-311. Seminar in Theoretical Statistics 3-3 

Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 135 

Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 321-322. Special Problems 3-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor 

Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. ST 331-332. Advanced Research 3-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: William Milner Roberts, Head, Leonard William Aurand, 
Thomas Nelson Blumer, John Lincoln Etchells, Maurice W. Hoover, 
Ivan Dunlavy Jones, Marvin Luther Speck, Frederick Gail Warren 

Associate Professors: Thomas Alexander Bell, Daniel Fromm, Fred Russell 
Tarver, Jr. 

The Department of Food Science was established at North Carolina State 
in 1961 to integrate the various scientific disciplines which are basic to the 
preparation, processing, packaging, and distribution of foods in general. 
Programs of graduate study are offered leading to the Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. In order to pursue graduate study in the field 
of food science, the student must possess adequate information in the funda- 
mentals of the area in which he expects to specialize. The student's under- 
graduate education should have prepared him in mathematics, chemistry, 
biological and physical sciences as well as in the humanities and language 
skills. Following this preparation, the student can pursue more specialized 
fields. 

In the area of food chemistry, the student can conduct research and study 
in peroxidation of lipids in foods, flavor chemistry, protein denaturation, 
and various problems of biophysical chemistry. 

Engineering aspects of food science are offered in the principles of auto- 
mation and industrial engineering in food plant operations. 

The field of food products technology is concerned with the development 
of new foods and the improved quality of existing foods. 

Food microbiology is designed to offer study and research in fundamental 
principles of microbiology involved in promoting growth of microorganisms 
essential to the manufacture of various foods and the control of unwanted 
microorganisms in foods. 

The department's physical facilities include research laboratories equipped 
for chemistry and microbiology, and processing facilities and equipment 
for dairy, fruit, vegetable, poultry, and meat products. 

The Department of Food Science maintains close liaison with the facul- 



120 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ties of supporting departments. Depending on the area chosen by the 
student for his major interest, he will have strong support for his minor 
from faculties in chemistry, economics, engineering, genetics, microbiology, 
and statistics. 

A graduate program in Food Science and Sanitation is offered by the 
Department of Food Science and the Department of Environmental Sciences 
and Engineering of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This 
program is designed to provide an enrichment in environmental health to 
graduate students majoring in Food Science at Raleigh; similarly, it is to 
provide an enrichment in food science to graduate students majoring in 
Environmental Sciences and Engineering at Chapel Hill. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

FS 401. Market Milk and Related Products 3-0 

Principles of processing, distribution and quality of fluid milk and related 
products. 

FS 403. Ice Cream and Related Frozen Dairy Foods 0-3 

Prerequisite: FS 401 

Choice, preparation and processing of ingredients and freezing of ice cream 

and other frozen desserts. 

FS 404. (PO 404) Poultry Products 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 101, ZO 103 

Selection, processing, grading and packaging poultry meat and eggs. Factors 

involved in preservation of poultry meat and eggs. 

FS 410. Food Products Evaluation 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 361 or Equivalent 

A comprehensive study of problems encountered in new food product de- 
velopment and consumer acceptance. A study of the nature of sensory 
responses with emphasis on taste, smell and appearance (color) as related 
to foods; design and methodology of small and large consumer panel test- 
ing; and the application of appropriate mathematical procedures to food 
acceptance testing and methodology. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FS 502. Food Chemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 220 or CH 221 

The basic composition, structure and properties of food, and the chemistry 
of changes occurring during processing and utilization of food. Interpretation 
and integration of widely published data in the food field with basic prin- 
ciples of chemistry. Mr. Aurand. 

FS 503. Food Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisites: CH 215, CH 351, FS 502 

A study of the principles, methods and techniques necessary for quantitative 
physical and chemical analyses of food and food products. Results of analysis 
will be studied and evaluated in terms of quality standards and governing 
regulations. Mr. Aurand. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 121 

FS 505. (BO 505) Food Microbiology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

The relationship of habitat to the occurrence of microorganisms on foods; 
environmental factors affecting the growth of various microorganisms in 
foods; microbiological action in relation to food spoilage and food manu- 
facture; physical, chemical and biological destruction of microorganisms in 
foods; methods for microbiological examination of food-stuffs; and public 
health and sanitation bacteriology. Mr. Speck. 

FS 506. (BO 506) Advanced Food Microbiology 3-0 

Prerequisite: FS 505 or Consent of Instructor 

Ecology and physiology of microorganisms important in the manufacture 
and deterioration of various classes of foods; the identification of represen- 
tative species of such microorganisms isolated from natural environments; 
principles of nutrition, symbiosis and bacteriophage activity in culture 
maintenance for food production. Mr. Speck. 

FS 521, FS 522. Technology of Fruit ond Vegetable Products 3-3 

Prerequisite: BO 412 

Comprehensive treatment of principles and methods of preservation of 
fruits and vegetables, including studies of commercial plant operations, and 
visits to food processing plants. Mr. Hoover. 

FS 590. Food Science Seminar 0-1 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor 

A review and discussion of scientific articles, progress reports in research 

and special problems of interest. Graduate Staff. 

FS 591. Special Problems in Food Science 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Prerequisites: Senior or Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor 
Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest 
in foods. The scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The 
problems are designed to provide training and experience in research. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

FS 690. Seminar in Food Science 1-1 

Preparation and presentation of scientific papers, progress reports of research 
and special topics of interest in foods. Graduate Staff. 

FS 691. Special Research Problems in Food Science Credits by Arrangement 

Directed research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide 
experience in research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff. 

FS 699. Research in Food Science Credits by Arrangement 

Original research preparatory to the thesis for the Master of Science or 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. Graduate Staff. 



122 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Richard Joseph Preston, Dean, Roy Merwin Carter, John 
Warren Duffield, Eric Louis Ellwood, Benjamin Anderson Jayne, 
Arthur Kelman, Joe Oscar Lammi, T. Ewald Mart, Alfred J. Stamm, 
Bruce J. Zobel 

Associate Professors: Aldos Cortez Barefoot, Jr., Charles Bingham Davey, 
Maurice H. Farrier, Clarence Arthur Hart, Thomas O. Perry 

Assistant Professors: Gene Namkoong, Leroy C. Saylor 

The School of Forestry offers graduate work leading to the Master's and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Two types of master's programs are 
available to the graduate student. 

The professional degrees of Master of Forestry and Master of Wood Tech- 
nology are offered for students who are interested in advanced applications 
of fundamental principles to the specialized fields of forestry. The course 
program emphasizes professional specialization. There is no language re- 
quirement. 

The degree of Master of Science is offered for the student who contem- 
plates a career in research, in teaching, or both. The course of study for the 
Master of Science degree provides for a comprehensive knowledge of forest 
management or wood technology and furnishes the training essential for 
successful research in these fields. Training is broadly-based and emphasizes 
fundamental science. There is both a thesis and language requirement. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available to forestry students of high 
intellectual capactiy who can demonstrate the ability to undertake original 
research and scholarly work at the highest levels. 

Candidates for the master's degree fall under one of the following 
categories: 

1. Students with a bachelor's degree in forestry from a school of recog- 
nized standing. These students may secure the master's degree in one aca- 
demic year. 

2. Students with a bachelor's degree, other than in forestry, from a 
college, university, or scientific school of high standing. These students 
may secure the master's degree in two academic years provided they have 
the requirements in botany, chemistry, and mathematics required in the 
freshman and sophomore years of the curricula. Candidates for the degree 
of Master of Forestry or Master of Science in forest management who do not 
hold an undergraduate degree in forestry must start their program with the 
summer camp. 

3. Students not possessing a bachelor's degree may earn, through proper 
selection of courses, a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the forestry 
curricula at the end of the fourth year and a master's degree in forestry or 
wood technology at the end of the fifth year. 

A wide and rapidly expanding field of employment possibilities is avail- 
able in the Southeast to young men trained in forestry. Until recent years 
most job opportunities were with government agencies in managing public 
forests. This field still constitutes a major source of employment. These 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 123 

agencies include state and federal forest services, extension services, and 
other groups such as the Soil Conservation Service and the Tennessee Valley 
Authority. 

In recent years job opportunities with private industries have expanded 
greatly. Increasing numbers of technically trained young men are entering 
a wide variety of professional positions in the fields of forest land manage- 
ment, watershed management, logging, sawmilling, veneer and plywood 
manufacturing, pulp and papermaking, kiln drying, wood preservation, 
plastics and other chemical derivatives of wood, and the manufacture of 
wood products such as furniture, dimension stock, and various prefabricated 
items. 

Graduate training offers tangible well-established values to young men of 
proven ability. The demand for men with advanced degrees in forestry has 
far exceeded the supply for many years. 

Graduate preparation is essential for the specialists which are needed in 
many fields. Training through the master's degree is almost a requirement 
for men entering college teaching and public or industrial research. State 
and federal agencies as well as forest industries are employing research 
investigators at unprecedented levels. 

The continuing rapid expansion of southern forestry has resulted in a 
corresponding expansion in the need for trained men. As a general rule 
most employers will prefer a candidate with graduate training. While forest 
industry and public forest administration do not normally require gradu- 
ate training, increasing numbers of positions in these fields are being filled 
by men with advanced forestry degrees, particularly the master's degree. 

The administrative offices of the School of Forestry are located in Kilgore 
Hall. The first floor houses portions of the Wood Products Laboratory and 
the second and third floors consist of laboratories, library, classrooms, and 
offices. The Reuben B. Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory provides 
12,000 square feet of space for teaching and research in the production of 
pulp and paper. The Brandon P. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory pro- 
vides 18,000 square feet of space for pilot plant installations for product 
development work in the manufacture of lumber, veneer, plywood, particle 
board, laminated structures, furniture, and other fabricated wood products. 

The School of Forestry now owns, or has access to, over 80,000 acres of 
forest land located in six tracts and representing major forest types in the 
State. The laigest tract is the Hofmann Forest on the coastal plain which 
is operated by the North Carolina Forestry Foundation for the benefit of the 
School of Forestry. The Hill Forest in Durham County, the Hope Valley 
Forest in Chatham County, the Goodwin Forest in Moore County, and the 
Schenck Memorial Forest in Wake County include representative types of 
the Piedmont area. The Wayah Recreational Area of the North Carolina 
National Forest near Franklin is located in a typical mountain forest, and 
facilities at this area, leased from the Government, supplement the pre- 
viously established forestry camps of the Hofmann and Hill Forests and 
provide the School with permanent, well-equipped, modern camps in each 
of the three major regions of the State. 

An extensive research program in the fields of wood products, genetics 
and management, sponsored by the Agricultural Experiment Station, the 



124 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

U. S. Forest Service, and the lumber, plywood, furniture, pulp and paper, 
and particle board industries provides broad opportunities for graduate 
research at the master's and doctoral level. These programs offer research 
assistantships for graduate students whose backgrounds qualify them. Much 
valuable equipment is made available by industry for research in wood 
technology and it is accessible to the graduate student working in this area. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

FOR 403. Paper Process Analysis 0-3 

Manufacture of several types of papers with particular attention to stock 
preparation, sizing, filling and coloring. The finished products are tested 
physically and chemically and evaluated from the standpoint of quality and 
in comparison with the commercial products they are intended to duplicate. 

FOR 404. Management Analysis 0-3 

Application of management, logging, silvicultural and utilization practices 
on assigned areas. Each student must make a forest survey of an individual 
area and submit a report. 

FOR 405. Forest Inventory 0-3 

Timber estimating and data compilation. 

FOR 411, FOR 412. Pulp and Paper Unit Processes 3-3 

Principles of operation, construction and design of process equipment in 
the pulp and paper industry. 

FOR 413. Paper Properties and Additives 4-0 

Physical, chemical and microscopical examination of experimental and com- 
mercial papers and evaluation of the results in terms of the utility of the 
product tested. 

FOR 422. Forest Products 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 201; CH 203 or CH 426 

The source and method of obtaining derived and manufactured forest 
products other than lumber. 

FOR 423. Logging and Milling 3-0 

Timber harvesting and transportation methods, equipment and costs; safety 
and supervision; manufacturing methods; log and lumber grades. 

FOR 432. Merchandising Forest Products 2-0 

Principles and practices in the distribution and marketing of the products 
obtained from wood; organization and operation of retail, concentration and 
wholesale outlets. 

FOR 434. Wood Operations I 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, FOR 302 

Organization of manufacturing plants producing wood products including 
company organization, plant layout, production planning and control. Analy- 
sis of typical manufacturing operations in terms of process, equipment, size 
and product specification. The organization and operation of Wood Prod- 
ucts markets. 

FOR 435. Wood Operations II 0-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 301, FOR 302 

The application of the techniques of operations analysis to management 

decision making in the wood products field. Choice of products to manu- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 125 

facture. Allocation of production resources. Development of product distri- 
bution systems. 

FOR 441. Design of Wood Structures 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 341 

Strength and related properties of commercial woods; standard A.S.T.M. 
strength tests; toughness; timber fastenings; design of columns; simple, 
laminated and box beams; trusses and arches. 

FOR 444. Introduction to Quality Control 0-3 

Prerequisite. ST 361 

A study of methods used to control quality of manufactured wood products. 

Control charts for variable and attributes. Acceptance sampling techniques. 

FOR 461. Paper Converting 0-1 

A survey of the principal processes by which paper and paper board are 
fabricated into the utilitarian products of everyday use. 

FOR 462. Artificial Forestation 0-2 

Production collection, extraction, and storage of forest tree seeds; nursery 
practice; field methods of planting. 

FOR 463. Plant Inspections 0-1 

One week inspection trips covering representative manufactures of pulp 
paper and papermaking equipment. 

FOR 471. Pulping Process Analysis 4-0 

Preparation and evaluation of the several types of wood pulp. The influence 
of the various pulping and bleaching variables on pulp quality are studied 
experimentally and these data evaluated critically. 

FOR 481. Pulping Processes and Products 0-2 

Prerequisites: FOR 202, CH 203 or CH 221 

Fiber manufacturing process and equipment; wall insulation and container 
board products; manufacture of roofing felts; pulp products manufacturing; 
resin and specialty products, lignin and wood sugar products. 

FOR 482. Pulp and Paper Mill Management 0-2 

A survey of the economics of the pulp and paper industry is followed by a 
study of the work of the several departments of a paper mill organization 
and the functions of the executives who administer them. 

FOR 491, FOR 492. Senior Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Problems selected with faculty approval in the areas of management or 
technology. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

FOR 501. Forest Valuation 3-0 

Prerequisite: FOR 372 

The theory and techniques of valuation of forest land, timber stands, and 
forest practices as investments and for appraisals of damage. Risks and 
hazards in forestry as they apply to forest investments, forest insurance, and 
forest taxation. Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 511. Silviculture 0-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 361, BO 421 

The principle and application of intermediate and reproductive methods 



126 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

of cutting; controlled burning, silvicides, and other methods of hardwood 
control. The application of silvicultural methods in the forests of the 
United States. Mr. Duffield. 

FOR 512. Forest Economics 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 372, EC 201 

Economics and social value of forests; supply of, and demands for forest 
products; land use; forestry as a private and a public enterprise; economics 
of the forest industries. Mr. Lammi. 

FOR 513. Tropical Woods 0-2 

Prerequisites: FOR 203, FOR 301 

Structure, identification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical 

woods, especially those used in plywood and furniture. Mr. Barefoot. 

FOR 521, FOR 522. Chemistry of Wood and Wood Products 3-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 202, CH 215, CH 426, PY 212 

Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and wood components; pulping 

principles; electrical and thermal properties. Mr. Stamm. 

FOR 531, FOR 532. Forest Management 3-3 

Prerequisite: FOR 372 

Corequisite: FOR 511 

Management of timber lands for economic returns; the normal forest taken 

as the ideal; the application of regulation methods to the forest. 

Mr. Bryant. 

FOR 533. Advanced Wood Structure and Identification 2-0 

Prerequisite: FOR 202 

Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United 
States and some tropical woods; microscopic anatomical features and labora- 
tory techniques. Mr. Barefoot. 

FOR 553. Forest Photogrammetry 0-2 

Prerequisites: FOR 372; FOR 531 

Interpretation of aerial photographs, determination of density of timber 

stands and area mapping. Mr. Lammi. 

FOR 571. Advanced Forest Mensuration 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 311, FOR 372 

Study of cyclical variation in growth of individual trees and stands; analysis 
of stand structures in even-aged versus all-age stands; general concepts of 
growing stock levels on yields; evaluation of growth prediction methods. 

Mr. Maki. 

FOR 572. Forest Policy 3-0 

Prerequisites: EC 201, FOR 219 

Corequisite: FOR 531 

Analysis of the forest policies of the United States and selected foreign 

countries; criteria for their evaluation; appraisal of current policies and 

alternatives. Mr. Lammi. 

FOR 591. Forestry Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate Standing 

Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber 

manufacturing, pulp technology, or forest management. 

Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 127 

FOR 599. Methods of Research in Forestry Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior or Graduate Standing 

Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of results; consideration 
of selected studies by forest research organizations; sample plot technique. 

Messrs. Ellwood, Maki, Zobel. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

FOR 601. Advanced Forest Management Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 
Directed studies in forest management. 

FOR 603. Technology of Wood Adhesives 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: CH 425, CH 426, FOR 433 

The fundamentals of adhesives as applied to wood-to-wood and wood-to- 
metal bonding. Technology of adhesives. Preparation and use of organic 
adhesives. Testing of adhesives and evaluation of quality of adhesives and 
bonded joints. Mr. Hart. 

FOR 604. Timber Physics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: FOR 441 

Density, specific gravity and moisture content variation affecting physical 
properties; physics of drying at high and low temperatures; thermal, sound, 
light and electrical properties of wood. Messrs. Ellwood, Hart. 

FOR 605. Design and Control of Wood Processes 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: FOR 604 

Design and operational control of equipment for processing wood. 

Mr. Ellwood. 

FOR 606. Wood Process Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: FOR 512, FOR 604 

Analysis of wood process through the solution of comprehensive problems 

involving the physics of temperature and moisture relations. 

Mr. Ellwood. 

FOR 607. Advanced Quality Control 0-3 

Prerequisites: FOR 606; ST 515 

Advanced statistical quality control as applied to wood processing. 

Mr. Hart. 

FOR 611. Forest Genetics 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: GN 411 and Permission of Instructor 

Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management and pulp utili- 
zation. Emphasis is on variations in wild populations, on the bases for selec- 
tion and desirable qualities and on fundamentals of controlled breeding. 

Mr. Zobel. 

FOR 621. Advanced Wood Technology Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Selected problems in the field of wood technology. Graduate Staff. 

FOR 691. Graduate Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Forestry or Closely Allied Fields 
Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems- 
and outstanding publications in forestry and related fields. 

Graduate Staff. 



128 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR 699. Problems in Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENETICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Thurston Jefferson Mann, Head, Carey Hoyt Bostian, Daniel 
Swartwood Grosch, Warren Durward Hanson, Harold Frank Robin- 
son, Benjamin Warfield Smith, Stanley George Stephens 

Associate Professors: Ken-Ichi Kojima, Dale Frederick Matzinger, Law- 
rence Eugene Mettler, Robert Harry Moll 

Assistant Professors: Frank Bradley Armstrong, Gene Namkoong, Leroy 
Charles Saylor, Anastasios Christos Triantaphyllou 

Associate Members of the Genetics Faculty 

Professors: Jay Lawrence Apple, Fred Derward Cochran, Columbus Clark 
Cockerham, Dan Ulrich Gerstel, Edward Walker Glazener, Walton 
Carlyle Gregory, Paul Henry Harvey, Frank Lloyd Haynes, Jr., Teddy 
Theodore Hebert, Guy Langston Jones, Kenneth Raymond Keller, 
James Edward Legates, Thurston Jefferson Mann, Philip Arthur 
Miller, Daniel Townsend Pope, Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Donald Lo- 
raine Thompson, Nash Nicks Winstead, Bruce John Zobel 

Associate Professors: Ernest Oscar Beal, William Lowery Blow, Charles 
Aloysius Brim, Will Allen Cope, Emmett Urcey Dillard, John Wesley 
Dudley, Donald Allen Emery, James Walker Hardin, Richard Robert 
Nelson, Thomas O. Perry, Lyle Llewellyn Phillips, John O. Rawlings, 
David H. Timothy 

Assistant Professors: Gene John Galletta, W. R. Henderson, Joshua A. 
Lee, Odis Wayne Robison 

Graduate study under direction of the genetics faculty may enable the 
student to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. A candidate for the master's degree must acquire a thorough under- 
standing of genetics and its relation to other biological disciplines and must 
present a thesis based upon his own research. In addition to a comprehen- 
sive knowledge of his field, a candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate 
his capacity for independent investigation and scholarship in genetics. 

At North Carolina State there are no sharp divisions along departmental 
lines between theoretical and applied aspects of genetics research. The 
members and associate members of the genetics faculty are located in nine 
different departments of the School of Agriculture, the School of Forestry, 
and the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. They are 
studying an extremely wide range of genetic problems and are utilizing not 
only the "classic" laboratory material (Drosophila, Habrobracon, maize, 
mice) but also farm animals and agricultural and horticultural plants of 
the region. A student has, therefore, a wide choice of research problems in 
any of the following fields: cytology and cytogenetics, physiological and 
irradiation genetics, forest genetics, population genetics, and the application 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 129 

of quantitative genetics to breeding methodology. Arrangements with the 
School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
enable specialized study in human and medical genetics. 

The offices and laboratories of the department are located in Gardner 
Hall with greenhouse facilities adjacent to the building. A genetics garden 
for use in the intensive research with plants and teaching functions is 
located three miles from the departmental offices. The departmental staff 
and the associate faculty members in Animal Science, Botany, Crop Science, 
Horticultural Science, Poultry Science, Plant Pathology, Experimental Sta- 
tistics, and Forest Management are most fortunate in being able to draw 
upon the extensive facilities of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

GN 411. The Principles of Genetics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: BO 103 or ZO 103 

An introductory course. The physical and chemical basis of inheritance; 
genes as functional and structural units of heredity and development; quali- 
tative and quantitative aspects of genetic variation. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

GN 503. (See ANS 503. Genetic Improvement of Livestock.) 

GN 512. Genetics 4-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

Intended for students desiring more thorough and detailed training in 
fundamental genetics with some attention to physiological aspects. (Stu- 
dents conduct individual laboratory problems.) Mr. Grosch. 

GN 513. Cytogenetics I 4-0 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or With Consent of Instructor 

The chromosomes as vehicles of heredity. Mitosis and meiosis as bases of 
genetic stability and recombination. Structural and numerical aberrations 
and their effect upon the breeding systems of plants and animals. Interspeci- 
fic hybrids and polyploids. Lectures and laboratory. Mr. Gerstel. 

GN 520. (See PO 520. Poultry Breeding.) 

GN 532. (ZO 532) Biological Effects of Radiations 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 103 or With Consent of Instructor 

Qualitative and Quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible 
spectrum) on biological systems, to include both morphological and physio- 
logical aspects in a consideration of genetics, cytology, histology, and mor- 
phogenesis. Mr. Grosch. 

GN 540. (ZO 540) Evolution 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and 
consequences of organic diversity. (Offered in 1964-65 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Smith. 

GN 541. (CS 541 and HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512, ST 511 or Consent of Instructor 

Principles and methods of plant breeding. Graduate Staff. 



130 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GN 542. (See CS 542 or HS 542. Plant Breeding Field Procedures.) 

GN 550. Experimental Evolution 0-3 

Prerequisites: GN 512, GN 513 or Consent of Instructor 
Experimental evolution deals primarily with micro-evolutionary processes 
examined at the inter- and intra-specific population level. A review of the 
results from experimental population studies and analyses of natural popu- 
lations concerning variation patterns and adaptation, natural selection, poly- 
morphism, introgression, population breeding structure, isolating mechanism, 
etc., is made and interpreted in relation to Neo-Darwinian concepts of the 
origin of species. Mr. Mettler. 

GN 561. Biochemical and Microbial Genetics 3-0 

The course will include the development of the fields of biochemical and 

microbial genetics and will emphasize both the techniques and concepts 
utilized in current research. Mr. Armstrong. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

GN 602. (See ANS 602. Population Genetics in Animal Improvement.) 

GN 607. (PP 607) Genetics of Fungi 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 512 or Equivalent, Consent of Instructor 
Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on prin- 
ciples and theories that have evolved in recent developments. Mr. Nelson. 

GN 61 1. (See FOR 61 1. Forest Genetics.) 

GN 613. (See CS 613. Plant Breeding Theory.) 

GN 626. (See ST 626. Statistical Concepts in Genetics.) 

GN 631. Mathematical Genetics 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512, ST 511 or Consent of Instructor 
History of mathematical biology, role of mathematical concepts in the 
development of genetic science, theory of genetic recombination, dynamics 
of genetic population. (Offered in 1963-64 and alternate years.) 

Mr. Kojima. 
GN 633. Physiological Genetics 0-3 

Prerequisite: GN 512 

Recent advances in physiological genetics. Attention will be directed to 
literature on the nature and action of genes, and to the interaction of 
heredity and environment in the expression of the characteristics of higher 
organisms. 

GN 641. Colloquium in Genetics 2-2 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; Consent of Instructor 

Informal group discussion of prepared topics assigned by instructor. 

Graduate Staff. 
GN 691. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

GN 695. Special Problems in Genetics 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Prerequisites: Advanced Graduate Standing, Consent of Instructor 
Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. 

Graduate Staff. 

GN 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of 
six credits for the Master's degree; by arrangement for the Doctorate. 

Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 131 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

(See Department of Mineral Industries) 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Preston William Edsall, Head, William Joseph Block, Marvin 
L. Brown, Jr., Fred Virgil Cahill, Jr., John Tyler Caldwell, Abraham 
Holtzman, Stuart Noblin 

Associate Professors: Burton Floyd Beers, Ralph Weller Greenlaw 

No graduate degrees are offered in history or political science at North 
Carolina State. Graduate programs leading to advanced degrees in this 
field are offered at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The 
courses listed below are eligible for graduate credit when they form a part 
of an approved graduate program in other departments, and work in history 
and political science may serve as a minor field. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

HI 401. Russian History 3-0 

This course presents the major trends in Russian social, political, economic, 
and cultural history, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
turies. USSR policy is studied in relation to the full sweep of Russian 
history. 

HI 402. Asia and the West 0-3 

A history of Asia from the mid-nineteenth century to the present with em- 
phasis on Asian nationalism and conflict with the imperial powers. 

HI 409. Colonial America 2-0 

A study of the development of the American colonies in the seventeenth 
and eighteenth centuries, with special emphasis on European backgrounds. 

HI 411. The American Revolution and the Confederation 3-0 

The historical steps in the establishment of the United States as an inde- 
pendent nation. The conflict with Great Britain after 1763 leading to the 
declaring of independence; the military and diplomatic aspects of the war 
for American independence; the peace negotiations and the peace settlement 
of 1783; the domestic problems and foreign relations in the immediate post- 
war years; the establishment of government in the new nation terminating 
with the adoption of the Constitution of 1787. 

HI 412. Recent United States History 3 or 3 

A study of the main current in American political, economic, social, and 
diplomatic history of the twentieth century. 

HI 422. History of Science 3-0 

A study of the evolution of science from antiquity to the present with 
particular attention given to the impact of scientific thought upon selected 
aspects of western civilization. The course provides a broad perspective of 
scientific progress and shows the interrelationship of science and major his- 
torical developments. 



132 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HI 491, HI 492. Seminar in History 3-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing in History; Open to Other Seniors and Grad- 
uate Students With Departmental Approval 

A study of the works of significant historians and a survey of historical phi- 
losophies, theories, and techniques. Intensive reading on selected topics and 
exercises in research, criticism, and exposition. 

PS 401. American Parties and Pressure Groups 3 or 3 

After a brief survey of those features of American government essential to 
an understanding of the political process, the course proceeds to examine 
the American electorate and public opinion and devotes its major attention 
to the nature, organization, and programs of pressure groups and political 
parties and to their efforts to direct opinion, gain control of government, 
and shape public policy. Special attention is given to party organization 
and pressure group activity at the governmental level and to recent proposals 
to improve the political party as an instrument of responsible government. 

PS 406. Problems in State Government 0-2 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or An Acceptable Substitute 

Selected problems arising from the operation of the legislative, administra- 
tive, and judicial machinery. In addition to acquiring a comprehensive view 
of these problems each student will make an intensive study of a special 
phase of one of them. Special attention will be given to North Carolina. 

PS 431. International Organization 3-0 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or An Acceptable Substitute 
A study of the evolving machinery and techniques of international or- 
ganization in the present century with particular emphasis on recent de- 
velopments. The actual operation of international organization will be 
illustrated by the study of selected current international problems. 

PS 452. The Legislative Process 0-3 

A study of the formulation of public policy from the institutional and 
behavioral viewpoints. Important current legislative problems at the con- 
gressional and state legislative levels will be selected and will serve as a 
basis for analyzing the legislative process. 

HI, PS 461. The Soviet Union 0-3 

An analysis of the structure and function of the major Soviet economic, 
political, and social institutions with special stress on the historical roots 
and continuity of Russian civilization. The course is presented in three 
equal phases of approximately five weeks each, covering Russian history, 
Soviet government, and Soviet economy. 

PS 491, PS 492. Seminar in Political Science 3-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Political Science; Open to Other Seniors and 
Graduate Students With Departmental Approval 

Emphasizing intensive independent work on selected topics, this seminar 
stresses familiarity with the literature and other resources of political science 
and further develops the student's skills in the methodology of the discipline. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 133 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PS 501. Modern Political Theory 3-0 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or HI 205 or An Acceptable Substitute 
A study of the state and its relationship to individuals and groups, ap- 
proached through the reading of selected passages from the works of out- 
standing political philosophers from the sixteenth century to the present. 

Mr. Holtzman. 

PS 502. Public Administration 0-3 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or PS 202 or An Acceptable Substitute 
A study of the principles and problems of administration in public agencies, 
including such matters as organization, personnel, fiscal management, rela- 
tionship to the legislative and judicial functions, control of administrative 
agencies and policies, and public relations. 

Mr. Block. 

PS 510. (EC 510) Public Finance 0-3 

Prerequisite: The Basic Course in Economics Required by the Degree Grant- 
ing School 

A survey of the theories and practices of government taxing, spending, and 
borrowing, including inter-governmental relationships and administrative 
practices and problems. 

Mr. Block. 

PS 512. American Constitutional Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: PS 201 or An Acceptable Substitute 

Basic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial review, 
individual rights and political privileges, and national and state power. 
Specal attention is given to the application of these doctrines to the regu- 
lation of business, agriculture, and labor and the rights safeguarded by the 
First, Fifth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. 

Messrs. Cahill, Edsall. 

HI 534. (RS 534) Farmers' Movements 0-3 

Prerequisite: Three Credits in American History, American Government, 
Sociology or A Related Social Science 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United 
States and Canada principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the 
Farmers' Alliance, the Populist revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, 
the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, cooperative marketing, gov- 
ernment programs, and present problems. 

Mr. Noblin. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PS 691. Applied Principles of Public Administration 2-4 By Arrangement 

Prerequisite: PS 502 or An Acceptable Substitute 

An advanced course in administrative principles and methods. Students 
will perform individual or group research, under supervision, in specific 
administrative topics within the context of those public agencies which 
function in their respective fields of technology. 

Mr. Block. 



134 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PS 696. Problems in Political Science 2-4 By Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Advanced Graduate Standing 

An independent advanced research course in selected problems of govern- 
ment and politics. The problems will be chosen in accordance with the needs 
and desires of the students registered for the course. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Fred Derward Cochran, Head, Monroe Evans Gardner, 
Frank Lloyd Haynes, Jr., John Mitchell Jenkins, Jr., Clarence Leslie 
McCombs, Daniel Townsend Pope 

Associate Professors: Walter Elmer Ballinger, Thomas Franklin Cannon, 
Leaton John Kushman, Conrad Henry Miller 

Assistant Professors: Gene John Galletta, Roy Axel Larson 

The Department of Horticultural Science offers the Master of Science 
degree and the professional degree. Master of Horticulture. Evidence of 
high scholastic achievement in the basic biological sciences is particularly 
desirable for students who expect to study for the Master of Science degree 
in horticulture. 

The department has excellent greenhouses, laboratories, cold storages, 
and access to adequate field plots, for graduate training in crop production, 
plant propagation, nutrition and physiology, biochemistry, morphology, 
plant breeding, cytology, and post-harvest physiology. The greenhouse range 
covers over 30,000 square feet of space and has twenty-one sections, each 
containing individual temperature and light control equipment. Laboratory 
facilities include four analytical laboratories, two cytological and anatomical 
laboratories, one soil testing laboratory for greenhouse control, one radio- 
isotope laboratory, and one landscape and floral design laboratory. Post- 
harvest facilities include, additionally, fourteen controlled temperature 
storage rooms, and grading, washing and packaging equipment. These 
combined facilities provide a wide variety of opportunities in basic and 
technical research in the horticultural field. An extensive and varied as- 
sortment of plant materials is available for use in graduate programs. 

The wide variations in climate and soils in North Carolina, from the 
coast to the mountains, make possible the study of plant responses under 
these varied conditions. Land and facilities for horticultural research are 
available on ten of the outlying stations located throughout the State. 

The opportunities for employment after advanced training include teach- 
ing and research in state and privately endowed educational institutions; 
research and regulatory positions with the United States Department of 
Agriculture, both foreign and domestic; extension specialists and county 
agents; research, production and promotional work with food, chemical, 
and seed concerns; orchard, nursery and greenhouse supervisors; and in- 
spectors and quality control technologists. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 135 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

HS 411. Nursery Management 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

The principles and practices involved in the production, management, and 
marketing of field-grown and container-grown nursery plants. Field trips 
will be taken. 

HS 421. Fruit Production 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

A study of identification, adaptation, and methods of production and 
marketing of the principal tree and small fruits. Modern practices as re- 
lated to selection of sites, nutritional requirements, management practices, 
and marketing procedures will be discussed. 

HS 432. Vegetable Production 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

A study of the origin, importance, distribution, botanical relationships, and 

principles of production and marketing of the major vegetable crops. 

HS 441. Floriculture I 3-0 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

The scope and importance of the commercial flower industry; the basic 
principles and practices involved in the production and marketing of flowers 
grown in the greenhouse and in the field. 

HS 442. Floriculture II 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

Principles and methods of production of commercial flower crops in the 
greenhouse and in the field, including fertilization, moisture, temperature, 
and light relationships, insect and disease control, and marketing of cut 
flowers and pot plants. 

HS 471. Aboriculture 0-3 

Prerequisites: BO 103, SSC 200 

A study of the principles and practices in the care and maintenance of 
ornamental trees and shrubs, such as pruning, fertilization, control of insects 
and diseases, and tree surgery. Field trips will be taken. 

HS 481. Breeding of Horticultural Plants 3-0 

Prerequisite: GN 411 

The application of genetic and other biological sciences to the improve- 
ment of horticultural crops. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HS 541. (GN 541 or CS 541) Plant Breeding Methods 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512; ST 511 Recommended 

An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles 

and concepts of inheritance. 

Messrs. Haynes, Timothy. 



136 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HS 542. (GN 542 or FC 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 

2 in Summer Sessions 
Prerequisites: HS 541 or CS 541 or GN 541 

Laboratory and field study of the application of various plant breeding 
techniques and methods used in the improvement of economic plants. 

Graduate Staff. 

HS 552. Growth of Horticultural Plants 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of the effect of nutrient-elements, water, light temperature, and 

growth substances on horticultural plants. 

Messrs. Fish, Miller. 

HS 562. Post-Harvest Physiology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BO 421 

A study of chemical and physiological changes that occur during handling, 
transportation, and storage which affect the quality of horticultural crops. 
Consideration will be given to pre- and post-harvest conditions which in- 
fluence these changes. 

Messrs. Ballinger, McCombs. 

HS 591. Senior Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Senior in Horticulture 

Presentation of scientific articles, progress reports in research, and special 

problems in horticulture and related fields. 

Graduate Staff. 

HS 599. Research Principles Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 

Investigation of a problem in horticulture under the direction of the in- 
structor. The students obtain practice in experimental techniques and pro- 
cedures, critical review of literature and scientific writing. The problem may 
last one or two semesters. Credits will be determined by the nature of the 
problem, not to exceed a total of 4 hours. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

HS 613. (See CS 613. Plant Breeding Theory.) 

HS 621. Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research 3-0 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Principles and methods of research in the field of horticulture and their 

application to the solution of current problems. Critical study and evaluation 

of scientific publications. Compilation, organization, and presentation of 

data. 

Mr. Cochran. 

HS 691. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Presentation of scientific articles and special lectures. Students will be re- 
quired to present one or more papers. Attendance of all graduate students 
is required. 

Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 137 

HS 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in Horticulture; Consent of Chairman of 
Advisory Committee 

Original research on specific problems in fruit, vegetable, and ornamental 
crops. Thesis prepared should be worthy of publication. A maximum of six 
credits is allowed toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation on 
credits in Doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
(See School of Education) 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
(See School of Education) 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Clifton A. Anderson, Head, Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., Robert 

W. Llewellyn 
Visiting Professor: Rudolph Willard 

The Department of Industrial Engineering offers graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science degree. The courses in this department reflect the 
new emphasis in the so-called operations research approach to the field. 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the technical details of organiz- 
ing men, materials, machines, capital and other resources to improve the 
efficiency of manufacturing, processing, and distribution activities. The basic 
education in industrial engineering emphasizes the utilization of the engineer- 
ing sciences and mathematical and statistical analyses in the solution of 
planning, operating and control problems. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

IE 401. Industrial Engineering Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 304; MA 405; ST 362 

An introductory course in some of the more recently developed operations 
research techniques; applications of dynamic programming, replacement 
theory, Markov processes, queueing theory, linear programming; graphical 
methods of solutions; information theory and servomechanisms in Indus- 
trial Engineering. A balance will be sought between theory and practical 
applications. 

IE 402. Industrial Engineering Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: IE 401 
Continuation of IE 401. 



138 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

IE 443. Qualify Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: ST 361 

Economic balance between cost of quality and value of quality, and tech- 
niques for accomplishing this balance. Organization for, specification and 
utilization of quality controls. Statistical theory and analyses as applied to 
sampling, control charts, tolerance determination, acceptance procedures 
and control of production. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

IE 515. Process Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 401; IE 443 

The technical process of translating product design into a manufacturing 
program. The application of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, 
methods, standards, costs and control functions of manufacturing. Labora- 
tory problems covering producer and consumer products. 

Graduate Staff. 

IE 517. Automatic Processes 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 401; IE 443 

Principles and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, 
process, and controls. Economic, physical, and sociological effects of auto- 
mation. Gradute Staff. 

IE 521. Control Systems and Data Processing 3-0 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

This course is designed to train the student in the problem and techniques 
required for systematic control of the production process and the business 
enterprise. This includes training in the determination of control factors, 
the collection and recording of data, and the processing, evaluation and use 
of data. The course will illustrate the applications and use of data processing 
equipment and information machines in industrial processes. Case problems 
will be used extensively. 

Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 522. Dynamics of Industrial Systems 0-3 

Prerequisite: IE 401 

A study of the dynamic properties of industrial systems; introduction to 
servomechanism theory as applied to company operations. Simulation of 
large nonlinear, multi-loop, stochastic systems on a digital computer; methods 
of determining modifications in system design and/or operating parameters 
for improved system behavior. Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 543. Standard Data 3-0 

Prerequisites: ST 361 or ST 515, One Course in Motion and Time Study 
Theory and practice in developing standard data from stopwatch observa- 
tions and predetermined time data; methods of calculating standards from 
data; applications of standard data in cost control, production planning and 
scheduling, and wage incentives. Mr. Anderson. 

IE 546. Advanced Quality Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: IE 304 or ST 362 

The statistical foundation of Quality Control is emphasized in this course 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 139 

as well as its economic implications. Mathematical derivation of most of the 
formulas used is given. Sampling techniques are treated extensively and 
many applications of this powerful technique are explained. 

Graduate Staff. 
IE 547. Engineering Reliability 3-0 

Prerequisites: IE 353 or IE 304; ST 421 

The methodology of reliability including application of discrete and con- 
tinuous distribution models and statistical designs; reliability estimation, 
relability structure models, reliability demonstration and decisions, and re- 
liability growth models. Examples of reliability evaluation and demonstra- 
tion programs. Graduate Staff. 

IE 551. Standard Costs for Manufacturing 0-3 

Prerequisites: One Course in Accounting; One Course in Motion and Time 

Study 

The development, application and use of standard costs as a management 

tool; use of industrial engineering techniques in establishing standard costs 

for labor, material and overhead. Analysis of variances and setting of 

budgets. Measures of management performance. Mr. Willard. 

IE 591. Project Work 2 to 6 - 2 to 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate or Senior Standing 

Investigation and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled in 

the fifth-year curriculum in Industrial Engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

IE 621. Inventory Control Methods 0-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

A study of inventory policy with respect to recorder sizes, minimum points 
and production schedules. Simple inventory models, models with restric- 
tions, price breaks, price changes, analysis of slow-moving inventories. 
Introduction to the smoothing problem in continuous manufacturing. Ap- 
plications of linear and dynamic programming and zero-sum game theory. 

Mr. Llewellyn. 

IE 651. Special Studies in Industrial Engineering Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups 
of students to take on studies of special areas in Industrial Engineering 
which fit into their particular program and which may not be covered by 
existing industrial engineering graduate level courses. The work would be 
directed by a qualified staff member who had particular interest in the 
area covered by the problem. Such problems may require individual re- 
search and initiative in the application of industrial engineering training 
to new areas or fields. Graduate Staff. 

IE 695. Seminar 1-1 

Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for graduate students. 
Case analyses and reports. Mr. Anderson. 

IE 699. Industrial Engineering Research Credits by Arrangement 

Graduate research in Industrial Engineering for thesis credit. 

Graduate Staff. 



140 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: John Wesley Cell, Head, Roberts Cozart Bullock, John 
Montgomery Clarkson, Walter Joel Harrington, Jack Levine, Carey 
Gardner Mumford, Howard Movess Nahikian, Graduate Administrator, 
Hubert Vern Park, Hans Sagan, Darrell Rhea Shreve, Herbert Elvin 
Speece, Raimond Aldrich Struble, Hubertus Robert Van Der Vaart, 
Oscar Wesler, Lowell Sheridan Winton 
Adjunct Professors: Alan Stuart Galbraith, Horace Maynard Trent 
Associate Professors: John William Querry, Tsuan Wu Ting 
Adjunct Associate Professor: Robert Taylor Herbst 
Assistant Professors: John William Bishir, Bruce Edward Goodwin 
Visiting Professor: Makoto Itoh 

The Department of Mathematics offers graduate studies in applied mathe- 
matics leading to the Master of Applied Mathematics, the Master of Science, 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Master of Applied Mathematics 
degree does not require a thesis nor a foreign language, but in all other 
respects it is the same as the Master of Science degree. Students who are 
admitted to the Graduate School to pursue studies in applied mathematics are 
expected to have had a strong undergraduate major in mathematics, includ- 
ing a year of advanced calculus and a year of modern algebra including ab- 
stract algebra and matrices. Those students who do not have these courses 
will be required to take them in addition to the minimum number required 
for the Master's degree. The areas of application require that the students 
offer a minor in some mathematically oriented area such as physics, the en- 
gineering sciences, or genetics. 

Individuals with graduate training in applied mathematics are in great 
demand in industry, in governmental laboratories, and in college teaching 
positions. Opportunities are many and varied in this field and include work 
as a member of a research team in such areas as satelite orbit theory, 
viscoelasticity, biomathematics, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, acoustics, 
solid state physics, nuclear reactor theory, geophysics, and in applications 
of computers in business. 

The department has available a number of teaching and research assistant- 
ships (a student holding a half-time assistantship is allowed to carry a study 
load of nine semester hours) . Also available for those graduate students 
studying toward the Ph.D. degree are a limited number of NDEA and Ford 
Foundation fellowships. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 401. Intermediate Differential Equations 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 

Theory of linear independence of solutions of linear differential equations, 
variation of parameters, superposition integral, simultaneous linear dif- 
ferential equations by transform methods, series solutions, special functions 
(Bessel, Legendre, etc.), orthogonal functions, and partial differential equa- 
tions by separation of variables. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 141 

MA 403. Fundamental Concepts of Algebra 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Integers; integral domains; rational numbers; fields, rings, groups. Boolean 

algebra. 

MA 404. Fundamental Concepts of Geometry 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Foundations of geometry; laws of logic; affine geometry; geometric transfor- 
mations; homogeneous coordinates; comparison of Euclidean and non- 
Euclidean geometries. 

MA 405. Introduction to Determinants and Matrices 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or MA 212 

Properties of determinants; theorems of Laplace and Jacobi; systems of 
linear equations. Elementary operations with matrices; inverse, rank, char- 
acteristic roots and eigenvectors. Introduction to algebraic forms. 

MA 421. Introduction to Probability 3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 

Elementary probability theory primarily for students not intending to take 
further work in probability or theoretical statistics. Includes theory of sets, 
finite probability, conditional probability, compound experiments, Bayes* 
theorem, counting techniques, random variables, binominal and other dis- 
tributions, generating functions, joint probability, continuous distributions. 

MA 441. Advanced Calculus I 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 and preferably a B-Average in Mathematics Courses 

Through MA 301 or MA 401 

Partial differentiation and applications, vectors, Stieltjes integrals, multiple 

integrals. 

MA 481. Special Topics in Mathematics 3-3 

MA 491. Reading for Honors in Mathematics 3-3 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MA 512. Advanced Calculus II 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Line and surface integrals, limits and indeterminate forms, infinite series, 
improper integrals. Graduate Staff. 

MA 513. Introduction to Complex Variables 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 or Consent of Department 

Fundamentals of differentiation and integration; mapping by elementary 

functions; power series; residues and poles. Graduate Staff. 

MA 514. Methods of Applied Mathematics 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 or Consent of Department 

Introduction to difference equations, integral equations, and calculus of 

variations. Graduate Staff. 

MA 516. Principles of Mathematical Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The real number system, elements of set theory, limits, continuity, differen- 



142 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

tiation, Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences of functions, fundamentals 
of Lebesgue theory, axiomatic development of set theory, topological and 
metric spaces. Graduate Staff. 

MA 517. Introduction to Point-Set Topology 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 516 

A study of basic set-theoretic and general topological notions of modern 
mathematics. Topics include set theory and cardinal numbers, topological 
spaces, metric spaces, and elementary discussion of function spaces. 

Graduate Staff. 

MA 524. Boundary Value Problems 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 441, MA 401 or MA 512 

Theory of first variation with applications to various physical phenomena 
(vibrating string, vibrating membrane, heat conduction, and wave propaga- 
tion) ; Bernoulli's separation theorem with application to vibration and heat 
conduction problems; Fourier series, Fourier-Bessel series, and Fourier- 
Legendre series and a full discussion of the Sturm-Liouville problem; and 
numerical approximation of eigenvalues by Rayleigh-Ritz method. 

Graduate Staff. 

MA 527. Numerical Analysis I 3-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Numerical solution of equations, introduction to the theory of errors, 
finite-difference tables and the theory of interpolation, numerical integra- 
tion, numerical differentiation, and elements of difference calculus. 

Graduate Staff. 

MA 528. Numerical Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 527 

Difference operators, summation procedures, numerical solution of ordinary 
differential equations, least-squares polynominal approximation, and Gaus- 
sian quadrature. Graduate Staff. 

MA 532. Differential Equations 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Phase-plane concepts; elementary critical points and stability theory; second 
order linear equations with variable coefficents; general linear autonomous 
systems; forced oscillations of linear systems; Sturm-Liouville systems; 
eigenvalue problems and generalized Fourier expansions; existence and 
uniqueness theorems. Graduate Staff. 

MA 536. Logic for Digital Computers 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Introduction to logic and formal languages of digital computers, algorithms, 

compilers, and heuristic programming. Graduate Staff. 

MA 537. Non-numeric Uses of Computers 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 536 

The use of computers in problems not involving numerical analysis. Formal 
differentiation and integration, algebraic models, combinatorics, theorem 
proving and decision making. Problems of mechanical translation. Special 
computers. Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 143 

MA 541. (ST 541) Theory of Probability I 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 441 

Axioms, discrete and continuous sample spaces, events, combinatorial analy- 
sis, conditional probability, repeated trials, independence, random variables, 
expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, probability and 
moment generating functions, central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, 
branching processes, recurrent events, random walk. [Offered also in special 
summer sessions at Virginia Polytechnic Institute (1964) and University of 
Florida (1965) .] Graduate Staff. 

MA 542. (ST 542) Theory of Probability II 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 541 

Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death 
processes, queueing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes, Brownian 
motion, information theory. Graduate Staff. 

MA 555. (PY 555) Principles of Astrodynamics 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 441; PY 411 or EM 312 

The differential equations of motion in two-body problems and their in- 
tegrals; orbit theory; integrals of the n-body problem; differential equations 
of motion of natural and artificial satellites and their approximate solutions. 

Graduate Staff. 

MA 581. Special Topics 3-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Department Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MA 602. Partial Differential Equations 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Ordinary differential equations in more than two variables, partial differen- 
tial equations of the first order, partial differential equations of the second 
order, Laplace's equation, the wave equation, the diffusion equation. 

Mr. Struble. 

MA 605. Non-Linear Differential Equations 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Phase-plane and phase-space concepts; existence and uniqueness theorems; 
continuity, analytic and differentiability properties of solution; properties 
of linear systems; stability in non-linear systems; topological methods; per- 
turbations of periodic solutions; asymptotic methods and resonance problems. 

Mr. Struble. 

MA 608. Integral Equations 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 512, MA 532 

Linear Volterra integral equations of the first and second kinds. Relationship 
to linear differential initial value problems. Special Volterra equations of 
the convolution type. Singular Volterra equations. Linear Fredholm integral 
equations of the first and second kind. Basic theory. Symmetric kernels. 
Hilbert-Schmidt theory (generalizations). Mr. Winton. 

MA 611. Complex Variable Theory and Applications I 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Elementary functions; analytic functions and Cauchy-Riemann equations; 



144 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

conformal mapping and applications; Taylor and Laurent series; contour 
integration and residue theory; the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. 

Mr. Bullock. 

MA 612. Complex Variable Theory and Applications II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 611 

Conformal mapping and applications to flow phenomea; multiple-valued 
functions and Riemann surfaces; further applications of residue theory; 
analytic continuation; infinite series and asymptotic expansions; elliptic 
functions and other special functions in the complex domain; representa- 
tion theorems. Mr. Bullock. 

MA 615. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable I 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 516, MA 517 or Consent of Department 
Sets and spaces; continuity of functions; measure, measurable sets and func- 
tions. Mr. Harrington. 

MA 616. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 615 

The Lebesgue integral; summable functions; absolute continuity; the space 

L 2 . Mr. Harrington. 

MA 621. Introduction to Modern Abstract Algebra 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

A study of the abstract structure and properties of groups, rings and ideals, 

and fields. Messrs. Nahikian, Park. 

MA 622. Vector Spaces and Matrices 0-3-3 

Prerequisite: MA 405 or Consent of Department 

A study of vector spaces and their relation to the theory of matrices. Matrix 
inversion, linear transformations, including similarity and orthogonal trans- 
formations, canonical forms. Properties of the characteristic and reduced char- 
acteristic function. Elementary divisors and functions of matrices. Applica- 
tions to systems of differential equations. 

Messrs. Nahikian, Park. 

MA 625. Introduction to Differential Geometry 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

Theory of curves and surfaces in 3-dimensional euclidean space with special 

reference to those properties invariant under the rigid body motions. 

Mr. Levine. 

MA 632. Operational Mathematics I 3-0 

Corequisite: MA 513 or MA 611 

Laplace transform with theory and application to problems in ordinary and 
partial differential equations arising from engineering and physics problems; 
Fourier integral and Fourier transforms and applications. 

Mr. Cell. 

MA 633. Operational Mathematics II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 632 

Extended development of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their 
uses in the solution of problems in ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions and in difference equations; Sturm-Liouville systems; advanced theory 
in ordinary and partial differential equations; Z-transforms, other infinite 
and finite transforms and their applications. Mr. Cell. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 145 

MA 635. Mathematics of Computers 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 335, MA 512, MA 528 
Corequisite: MA 405 or MA 622 

The development of methods for the solution of selected problems involving 
matrices; integral rational equations; ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions. Particular attention is paid to the question of convergence and sta- 
bility; examples solved on the IBM 650. Graduate Staff. 

MA 641. Calculus of Variations 0-0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The simplest problem of the calculus of variations in detail; variable end- 
points; iso-perimetric problems; Hamilton's principle; least action principle; 
introduction to the theory of linear integral equations of the Volterra and 
Fredholm types. Mr. Winton. 

MA 651. Expansion of Functions 0-0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 611, MA 633 or Equivalent 

Expansion of functions of one or more variables in Taylor series; asymptotic 
series; infinite products, partial fractions, continued fractions, series of 
orthogonal functions; applications in ordinary partial differential equations, 
difference equations and integral equations. 

Messrs. Cell, Harrington. 
MA 661. Tensor Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisite: MA 512 

The basic theory, tensor algebra, tensor calculus, invariants of quadratic 
differential forms; covariant differentiation; geometric applications, Rieman- 
nian spaces; generalized vector analysis. Mr. Levine. 

MA 662. Tensor Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: MA 661 

Continuation of MA 661, physical applications; dynamics, Legrange's equa- 
tions, the geometry of dynamics, cofiguration spaces. Further applications to 
electromagnetic theory and elasticity. Mr. Levine. 

MA 681. Special Topics in Analysis Up to 6 Hours Credit 

MA 683. Special Topics in Algebra Up to 6 Hours Credit 

MA 685. Special Topics in Numerical Analysis Up to 6 Hours Credit 

MA 687. Special Topics in Geometry Up to 6 Hours Credit 

MA 689. Special Topics in Applied Mathematics Up to 6 Hours Credit 

The above courses, MA 681 -MA 689, afford opportunities for graduate stu- 
dents to study advanced topics in mathematics under the direction of mem- 
bers of the graduate staff. These will on occasion consist of one of several 
areas such as, for example, advanced theory of partial differential equations, 
topology, mathematics of elasticity or of viscoelasticity, orbital mechanics, 
functional analysis, combinatorial analysis. Graduate Staff. 

MA 699. Research in Mathematics Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing, Approval of Adviser 

Individual research in the field of mathematics. Graduate Staff. 



146 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Robert Wesley Truitt, Head, Norval White Conner, Jesse 
Seymour Doolittle, Graduate Administrator, Karl P. Hanson, Hassan 
Ahmad Hassan, Richard Bennett Knight, Toyoki Kogi, Robert McLean 
Pinkerton, James Woodburn 

Associate Professors: Munir R. El-Saden, Bertram Howard Garcia, Rich- 
ard Shao-Lin Lee, Mehmet Necati Ozisik, Frederick Otto Smetana, 
John Kerr Whitfield, James Clifford Williams, III., James T. Yen, 
Carl Frank Zorowski 

Assistant Professors: Thomas Benson Ledbetter, Huseyin Cavit Topakoglu, 
Sridhar M. Ramachandra 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Entrance to the 
various programs in the department is normally based upon an accredited 
baccalaureate degree in engineering. 

At present, the major emphases in graduate study are the thermal sciences, 
including classical thermodynamics, heat transfer and transport phenomena, 
statistical thermodynamics and direct energy conversion; gas dynamics 
(aerothermochemistry, aerothermodynamics, plasmagasdynamics, magnetogas- 
dynamics and rarefied gasdynamics) and the mechanical sciences, such as 
principles of fluid motion, dynamics of compressible flow and viscous fluids, 
vibrations, mechanical transients and stress analysis; the aerospace science 
of aerodynamics, propulsion, boundary layer theory and heat transfer, and 
spacecraft design. 

The professional technological interests of the department are represented 
by graduate courses in nuclear power plants, steam and gas turbines, re- 
frigeration, internal combustion engines, lubrication, mechanics of machinery, 
and machine design analysis and synthesis. 

Graduate programs in mechanical engineering normally include sub- 
stantial work in the basic sciences of mathematics and physics, and study in 
related engineering departments is encouraged. 

The fundamental objective of graduate study in this field is to prepare 
the student for leadership in the various categories of research, teaching, 
and design. The graduate student is placed in close association with the 
graduate faculty who conduct individual research. Participation in a re- 
search project as a research assistant or employment as a teaching assistant is 
regarded as significant experience during residence. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

ME 401. Energy Conversion 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A course on the conversion of energy for engineering purposes based upon 
the fundamentals leading to engineering decisions in the arrangement and 
selection of energy conversion equipment. The conventional type of plant 
for energy conversion and the unconventional types, in particular, direct 
energy conversion and the feasibility of such plants. Factors which effect 
the cost of power and elements entering into the problem of monetary rates. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 147 

ME 402. Heat and Mass Transfer 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 302, MA 301 

A study of the fundamental relationships of steady and transient heat 
transfer by conduction, convection, radiation and during changes of phase; 
mass transfer by diffusion and convection; simultaneous mass and heat trans- 
fer. 

ME 405. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III 1-0 

Prerequisite: ME 306 

Required of Seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

The selection of appropriate instrumentation and the experimental analysis 
of small, predetermined engineering systems designed for flexibility and 
wide variation of parameters. Systems cover the gamut of Mechanical En- 
gineering activity with emphasis on analysis of system rather than character- 
istics of particular systems. 

ME 406. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory IV 0-1 

Prerequisite: ME 405 

Individual or small group investigation of an original problem under the 
supervision of a faculty member with an interest in the problem area. The 
investigation may be experimental, analytical, or both. Emphasis is placed 
on the philosophy and methodology of engineering research, and on in- 
dividual thinking and effort. 

ME 410. Jet Propulsion 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 352 or EM 303 

Application of fundamental principles of thermodynamics and the me- 
chanics of a compressible fluid to the processes of jet-propulsion and turbo- 
propeller aircraft; the effect of performance of components on performance 
of engine; analysis of engine performance parameters. 

ME 411, ME 412. Mechanical Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisites: EM 301, MIM 201, ME 315 
Required of Seniors in Mechanical Engineering 

Application of the basic principles of the mechanical sciences to the 
analysis and design of machines, devices and mechanical systems. Considera- 
tion of the complete design process including formulation of design concepts, 
synthesis of components, analysis of the assembly, and evaluation of the 
finalized design. Project activity with design orientation. 

ME 421. Aerospace Propulsion Systems 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 353 

Corequisite: ME 461 

A study of propulsion systems and their relation to the various flight regimes 

and space missions. The principles of thrust generation, the control, and 

the performance of various propulsion systems will be considered. 

ME 431. Thermodynamics of Fluid Flow 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: MA 301, EM 303 or ME 352, ME 302 

The fundamental dynamics and thermodynamic principles governing the 
flow of gases are presented from both theoretical and experimental view- 
points. Mathematical relations are closely correlated with physical phe- 
nomena to emphasize the complimentary nature of theory and experiment. 



148 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ME 432. Boundary Layer Theory and Heat Transfer 0-3 

Prerequisites: C or Better in ME 352; MA 401 or MA 441 
The course is intended to give the student both a physical and mathematical 
understanding of the problems of skin friction and heat transfer in present- 
day aerospace engineering. 

ME 435. Industrial Automatic Controls 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301 

Introduction to concept of automatic controls; fundamentals of two-position, 
proportional, floating and rate modes of control with a graphical and 
analytical presentation of each. Theoretical considerations of the process and 
an introduction to system analysis. 

ME 441. Technical Seminar 1 or 1 

Prerequisite: Graduating Senior Standing. 

Meetings once a week for the delivery and discussion of student papers on 

topics of current interest in Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 447. Performance, Stability and Control of Flight Vehicles 3-0 

Prerequisites: C or Better in ME 352; MA 401 or MA 441 
A study of aerodynamic and inertial factors and how they influence the 
motion of flight vehicles and their performance. The transfer function ap- 
proach is emphasized in the analysis of flight vehicle motion. 

ME 461. Aerospace Technology 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 208, EM 200, MA 301, ME 353 

An introduction to the principles of flight in and beyond the atmosphere. 
Includes the elements of aerodynamics of flight, the reentry problem, flight 
dynamics, guidance and control, power generation in space, manned and 
unmanned space flight and life support systems. 

ME 465, ME 466. Aerospace Engineering Laboratory 1-1 

Prerequisites: ME 306, ME 352 

Laboratory experience in wind tunnel experimentation, structural testing, 

environmental testing, and instrumentation for flight in and beyond the 

atmosphere. 

ME 468. Spacecraft Structures 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 369 

Corequisite: ME 461 

Basic techniques and procedures in the analysis of stresses and strains caused 

by the extreme heating of reentry space vehicles as well as the dynamic and 

impulsive loads occurring during the launching and loading period of flight 

will be considered and the resulting effects on the vehicle structure will be 

studied. 

ME 481. Flight Vehicle Design 0-5 

Prerequisites: ME 352, ME 461, ME 468, ME 447, ME 421, EE 202 
Integration of previous aerodynamic, heat transfer, materials, structures, 
and dynamical theory in the design of typical air-supported and space ve- 
hicles and their sub-systems. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 149 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ME 501. Steam and Gas Turbines 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and EM 303 or ME 352 

Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery flow 
passages; control and performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine 
processes. Mr. Doolittle. 

ME 507, ME 508. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals 3-3 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of opera- 
tion. The Otto engine: carburetion, fuel distribution, flame propagation, 
normal and knocking combustion, throttling, pumping, valve and spark 
timing, and altitude effects; the Diesel engine: injection and spray forma- 
tion fuel rating, atomization, penetration, diesel knock, combustion, pre- 
combustion, and scavenging as applied to reciprocating and rotary engines. 

Mr. Ledbetter. 
ME 515. Experimental Stress Analysis 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 315 

Theoretical and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis, with 
experimental emphasis on electrical strain gages and instrumentation, brittle 
coatings, grid methods, and photoelasticity. Laboratory includes a full ex- 
perimental investigation and report of a problem chosen by the student 
under the guidance of the instructor. Mr. Whitfield. 

ME 516. Photoelasticity 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 411 

Two and three-dimensional photoelasticity; the stress-optic law, isochroma- 
tics, isoclinics, stress trajectories, fractional orders of interference; three- 
dimensional techniques, oblique incidence, rotational and thickness effects; 
determination of principal stresses at interior points; laboratory investiga- 
tions. Mr. Whitfield. 

ME 517. Lubrication 0-3 

Prerequisite: EM 303 

The theory of hydrodynamic lubrication; Reynold's equation, the Sommer- 
field integration, effect of variable lubricant properties and energy equation 
for temperature rise. Properties of lubricants. Application to design of 
bearings. Boundary lubrication. Mr. Woodburn. 

ME 521. Aerothermodynamics 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 301, MA 301 and EM 303 or ME 352 
An examination of the basic concepts of gas dynamics such as the continuum, 
domain of applicability of continuum, acoustic velocity, compressibility ef- 
fects, and the conservation laws. Analysis of one dimensional flows such as 
isentropic flow, adiabatic flow, flow with friction, the normal shock. An 
introduction to the vector formulation of multi-dimensional problems. 

Mr. Lee. 
ME 541, ME 542. Aerodynamics Heating 3-3 

Prerequisites: MA 441 and ME 521 or Equivalent 

A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental findings of the 
compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers with special attention 
to the aerodynamic heating problem; application of theory in the analysis 
and design of aerospace hardware. Mr. Williams. 



150 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ME 545, ME 546. Project Work in Mechanical Engineering I, II 2 or 2 

Individual or small group investigation of a problem stemming from a 
mutual student-faculty interest. Emphasis is placed on providing a situa- 
tion for exploiting student curiosity. Graduate Staff. 

ME 554. Advanced Aerodynamic Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 352 

Development of fundamental aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathe- 
matical analysis and derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and 
comparison with experimental results. Introduction to supersonic flow 
theory. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 562. Advanced Aircraft Structures 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 468 

Development of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special 
problems in structural design, stiffened panels, rigid frames, indeterminate 
structures, general relaxation theory. Mr. Topakoglu. 

ME 571. Air Conditioning 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A fundamental study of summer and winter air conditioning including tem- 
perature, humidity, air velocity and distribution. Mr. Knight. 

ME 572. Refrigeration 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

A thermodynamic analysis of the simple, compound, centrifugal and multiple 
effect compression systems, the steam jet system and the absorption system of 
refrigeration. Mr. Knight. 

ME 581, ME 582. Hypersonic Aerodynamics 3-3 

Prerequisites: MA 512 and ME 521 or Equivalent 

A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental findings in hyper- 
sonic aerodynamics. Mr. Truitt. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

ME 601. Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 302 

First and Second Laws; theory of variable specific heats; general equations 
of thermodynamics; characteristic equations of state; reduced coordinates; 
prediction of properties of gases and vapors; chemical equilibrium; meta- 
stables; thermodynamics of fluid flow. Mr. El-Saden. 

ME 602. Statistical Thermodynamics 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 601, MA 441 

Fundamental principles of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical me- 
chanics and irreversible phenomena with particular reference to thermo- 
dynamics systems and processes. The conclusions of the classical thermo- 
dynamics are analyzed and established from the microscopic viewpoint. 

Mr. El-Saden. 

ME 603. Advanced Power Plants 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 401 

A critical analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants, thermo- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 151 

dynamics and economic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; 
study of recent developments in the production of power. 

Mr. Doolittle. 
ME 605. Aerorhermoehemistry 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 601 and MA 441 or Equivalent 

A generalized treatment of combustion thermodynamics including deriva- 
tion of thermodynamic quantities by the method of Jacobians, criteria for 
thermodynamic equilibrium, computation of equilibrium composition and 
adiabatic flame temperature. Introduction to classical chemical kinetics. 
Conservation equations for a reacting system, detonation and deflagration. 
Theories of flame propagation, flame stabilization, and turbulent combus- 
tion. Mr. Lee. 

ME 606. Advanced Gas Dynamics 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 601, MA 441 

The general conservation equations of gas dynamics from a differential and 
integral point of view. Hyperbolic compressible flow equations, unsteady 
one-dimensional flows, the non-linear problem of shock wave formation, 
isentropic plane flow, flow in nozzles and jets, turbulent flow. 

Mr. Smetana. 

ME 608. Advanced Heat Transfer I 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 402 or Equivalent 

Fundamental aspects, from an advanced viewpoint, will be considered in the 
conduction of heat through solids, convective phenomena, and the measure- 
ment and prediction of appropriate physical properties. Boundary value 
problems arising in heat conduction will be examined and both numerical 
and function solution techniques developed. Internal and external boundary 
layer analyses will be made on a variety of representative convection situa- 
tions. Mr. Ozisik. 

ME 609. Advanced Hear Transfer II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 608 

Advanced topics in the non-isothermal flow of fluids through channels will 
be investigated for slug, laminar, transitional and turbulent conditions. 
The influence of mass transfer on flow and heat transfer processes will be 
considered. Radiation exchange processes between solid surfaces, and solid 
surfaces and gases both stationary and moving will be discussed. 

Mr. Ozisik. 
ME 610. Advanced Topics in Heat Transfer 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 609 

This course constitutes a study of recent developments in heat transfer 
and related areas. It is anticipated that the course content will change from 
semester to semester. Mr. Ozisik. 

ME 611, ME 612. Advanced Machine Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: ME 412 

Kinematics of mechanical media, the stress tensor, the tensor of strains, 
elasticity, plasticity, time-dependent behavior; theories of failure, working 
stresses; shock and steady dynamic loading, creep, stress concentration, 
thermal stress, contact stresses; energy theories, finite difference and relaxa- 
tion methods; hydrodynamic lubrication. Application to the design of ma- 
chine frames, shafts, bearings, gears, springs, cams, etc. 

Mr. Zorowski. 



152 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ME 613. Mechanics of Machinery 3-0 

Prerequisites: ME 315, MA 512 

Vector dynamics, d'Alembert's principle, Lagrange's equations; rigid kine- 
matics, Euler's angles, rigid rotation, Coriolis accelerations; the inertia 
tensor. Application to mechanisms, gyroscopes, guidance and control sys- 
tems, rotating and reciprocating devices. Mr. Zorowski. 

ME 614. Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 315; MA 401 or 441 

Dynamic loads in mechanical media are considered in two categories— steady 
vibrations and transient shock and impact. The Lagrange equations and 
the wave equation are employed to study internal stresses and displacements 
in mechanical devices which result from such loading. 

Mr. Zorowski. 

ME 615. Aeroelasticity I 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 441, ME 411 or ME 468, ME 521 

Deformations of aero structures under static and dynamic loads, natural 
mode shapes and frequencies; two and three dimensional incompressible 
flow, wings, and bodies in unsteady flow; static aeroelastic phenomena. 

Mr. Topakoglu. 

ME 616. Aeroelasticity II 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 615 

Flutter, dynamic response phenomena such as transient landing stresses, 
gusts, continuous atmospheric turbulence; aeroelastic model theory, model 
design and construction. Mr. Topakoglu. 

ME 617. Plates and Shells in Mechanical Design 0-3 

Prerequisites: MA 441, ME 611 

The concept of members which are thin in one dimension, that is, plates 
and shells, is applied to mechanical design with particular emphasis on type 
of loading, conditions of service, and compliance of the member to its 
environment. Mr. Garcia. 

ME 625, ME 626. Direct Energy Conversion 3-3 

Prerequisite: ME 601 

An engineering study of the modern developments in the field of conver- 
sion of heat to power in order to meet new technology demands. Thermo- 
electric, thermomagnetic, thermionic, photovoltaic and magnetohydrody- 
namic effects and their utilization for energy conversion purposes, static 
and dynamic response, limitations imposed by the first and the second laws 
of thermodynamics. Energy and entropy balances, irreversible sources; in- 
herent losses, cascading, design procedures, experimental studies to determine 
the response and efficiency of various systems. Mr. El-Saden. 

ME 631. Applications of Ultrasonics to Engineering Research 3-0 

Prerequisites: MA 441, EE 332 

The technique and theory of propagation of ultrasonics in liquids, gases 
and solids. Development of ultrasonic transducers, the elastic piezoelectric 
and dielectric relationships. Ultrasonic applications of asdic or sonar cavita- 
tion, emulsification, soldering, welding, and acoustic properties of gases, 
liquids and solids. Mr. Woodburn. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 153 

ME 651. Principles of Fluid Motion 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 453 
Corequisite: MA 511 

Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis 
are emphasized. Potential flow theory development with introduction to the 
effects of viscosity and compressibility. Two dimensional and three dimen- 
sional phenomena are considered. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 652. Dynamics of Compressible Flow 3-0 

Prerequisites: ME 521, MA 441 

Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion in one-dimensional 
motion, channel flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation, and flows 
at transonic speeds. Mr. Pinkerton. 

ME 653. Supersonic Aerodynamics 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 652 

Equations of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of 
characteristics, hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil 
theory, and boundary layer shock interaction. Mr. Yen. 

ME 654. Dynamics in Viscous Fluids 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 651 

Development of the Navier-Stokes equations and the boundary layer theory. 
Laminar and turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment, flow 
separation, and transition. Mr. Williams. 

ME 657. Measurement in Rarefied Gas Streams 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 602 

A study of the basis for measurement of flow properties in rarefied gas 
streams. Included will be ionization gauges, hot wire anemometers and tem- 
perature probes, pi tot and static tubes, Langmuir probes, electron scattering 
and electron beam density gauges. Mr. Smetana. 

ME 658, ME 659. Molecular Gasdynamics 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 521, ME 602 

Statistical mechanics as applied to the derivation of the equations of gas- 
dynamics from the microscopic viewpoint. Energy levels of atoms and mole- 
cules and their relation to equilibrium thermodynamic concepts, in par- 
ticular, specific heats. Approximate solutions of the Boltzmann Equation. 
Treatments of viscosity, heat conduction, and electrical conductivity. Col- 
lision processes. High temperature behavior of multispecies gas mixtures. 

Mr. Smetana. 
ME 660. Aero-Mechanical Engineering Problems 0-3 

Prerequisites: ME 402, MA 514 

Derivation of governing equations and set up of representative problems 
in heat transfer, gas dynamics, and magneto-hydrodynamics; review of tech- 
niques for solving these problems. Introduction of other techniques such as 
method of steepest descent, method of Weiner-Hopt. variational methods 
and others. Phase-space and function space concepts will be introduced also. 
Purpose of the course in the graduate program is to strengthen the analy- 
tical techniques of the students in dealing with aero-mechanical engineering 
problems so that in their later studies more emphasis may be put on for- 
mulation of new problems and physical interpretation of new results. 

Mr. Yen. 



154 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ME 661, ME 662. Aerospace Energy Systems 3-3 

Prerequisites: MA 512, ME 521, PY 407 or Equivalent 

A study of energy systems appropriate to the varied requirements of space 
operations. Includes analysis of chemical, nuclear and solar energy sources 
and the theory of their adaptation to operational requirements for propul- 
sion and auxiliary power, cooling requirements, coolants and materials. 

Mr. Truitt. 

ME 671, ME 672. Advanced Air Conditioning Design I, II 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 571, ME 572 

The design of heating and air conditioning systems; the preparation of 
specifications and performance tests on heating and air conditioning equip- 
ment. Mr. Knight. 

ME 681. Introduction to Rocket Propulsion 3-0 

Prerequisite: ME 601 

Review of the exterior ballistics and performance of rocket propelled ve- 
hicles. Thermodynamics of real gases at high temperatures. Non-equilibrium 
flow in rocket nozzles. Mr. Hassan. 

ME 682. Solid Propellent Rockets 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 681 

A study of the design and performance of solid-propellant rockets; proper- 
ties and burning characteristics of solid propellants. Internal ballistics of 
solid propellant rockets. Design and design optimization. Combustion in- 
stabilities. Mr. Hassan. 

ME 683. Liquid Propellant Rockets 0-3 

Prerequisite: ME 681 

The study and design of liquid propellant rockets. Combustion of liquid 
fuels. Thrust chamber, propellant supply and injection system. Cooling of 
rocket motors. Low and high frequency instability in liquid rocket motors. 
Scaling laws. Mr. Hassan. 

ME 691, ME 692. Advanced Spacecraft Design 3-3 

Prerequisites: ME 542, ME 582 

Analysis and design of spacecraft including system design criteria, accelera- 
tion tolerance, entry environment, thermal requirements, criteria for con- 
figuration design, aerodynamic design, heating rates, thermostructural de- 
sign, boost phase, de-orbit, entry corridor, lift modulation, rolling entry, 
glide phase, maneuvering and landing, stability and control, thermal pro- 
tection system, materials, instrumentation, and life support systems. 

Mr.Truitt. 

ME 693. Advonced Topics in Mechanical Engineering 1 to 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Faculty and graduate student discussions of advanced topics in contemporary 

Mechanical Engineering. Graduate Staff. 

ME 695. Mechanical Engineering Seminar 1 or 1 

Faculty and graduate student discussions centered around current research 
problems and advanced engineering theories. Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 155 

ME 699. Mechanical Engineering Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Mechanical Engineering and Approval 

of Adviser 

Individual research in the field of Mechanical Engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 
(See Department of Mineral Industries) 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: William Wyatt Austin, Head, William Callum Bell, William 
Wurth Kriegel, John Mason Parker, III, Hans Heinrich Stadelmaier, 
Robert Franklin Stoops 

Adjunct Professor: Henry Mauzee Davis 

Associate Professors: Henry Seawell Brown, William Cullen Hackler, 
John Valentine Hamme, Carlton James Leith, Hayne Palmour, III 

Visiting Associate Professor: Joachim-Dietrich Schobel 

Assistant Professor: William Calvin Hood 

The Department of Mineral Industries offers graduate programs leading 
to the degrees of Master of Science in ceramic engineering, geological en- 
gineering, and metallurgical engineering, and to the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in ceramic engineering. Certain graduate courses are also offered 
for the benefit of students majoring in other areas who may be interested in 
pursuing advanced work in the mineral industries fields. 

Financial assistance is available to graduate students in the Department of 
Mineral Industries. Graduate assistantships permit half-time studies in 
either ceramic engineering, geological engineering, or metallurgical engi- 
neering, and half time to be devoted to teaching or other assigned duties. 
Also, certain sponsored fellowships that permit full time to be devoted to 
graduate studies, such as the Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundation Fel- 
lowship, the International Lead Zinc Research Organizations Fellowship 
in Ceramics, and the Ford Foundation Fellowships, are available. Applica- 
tions should be made to the department. 

Ceramic Engineering 

The potentially superior characteristics of ceramics for many advanced 
engineering applications in space, nuclear, and industrial technologies pre- 
sents many challenging opportunities for basic research in this rapidly ex- 
panding materials science. Present programs at N. C. State are characterized 
by intensive study and research in establishing intrinsic properties and 
elucidating governing mechanisms as functions of structure and environment. 
Crystalline ceramics are being investigated as single crystals (sapphire, ruby, 
and spinel grown in the Engineering Research Department's High Tempera- 
ture Crystal Laboratory) and as polycrystalline compacts produced by sinter- 



156 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ing and hot pressing. Traditional glass bonded, polyphase ceramics in a 
variety of product areas are under investigation. 

Statistically designed experimentation to study the properties of glasses 
have been initiated. Phase studies in the uranium-carbon-oxygen-nitrogen 
system are continuing. 

The prerequisite for graduate work in ceramic engineering is a proficiency 
in the undergraduate courses required for the bachelor's degree in ceramic 
engineering, or substantial equivalent. 

The department's ceramic laboratories are well equipped for research 
work. These facilities are augmented by those of the Ceramic Research 
Laboratories of the Department of Engineering Research. Also available are 
the Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction, Crystal Growing, and Phase 
Equilibria Laboratories of that department, the Nuclear Reactors of the 
Physics and Nuclear Engineering Departments, and the computer facilities 
of the Experimental Statistics Department. 

Geological Engineering 

The graduate program in geological engineering is directed to the ad- 
vanced training of qualified students interested in the professional economic 
applications of geological knowledge. The occupational fields include the 
locating of mineral resources, and the assessing of geological conditions at 
the sites of large civil engineering projects. Candidates for admission to 
this program should hold the Bachelor of Geological Engineering degree 
or a satisfactory equivalent, preferably including a strong background in 
physics, chemistry, and engineering sciences. 

The solution of professional problems in geology is today requiring more 
specialized training and quantitative methods than can be included in an 
undergraduate curriculum. A person with such training in geology finds 
employment with petroleum, mining, and construction companies, govern- 
mental agencies, and educational research institutions. 

A great variety of problems in igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic 
geology are to be found within a radius of fifty miles of North Carolina 
State. 

Facilities are available for research in mineralogy, petrography, economic 
geology, mineral dressing, and geologic problems relating to civil engineer- 
ing. Excellent collections of geological literature are available at North 
Carolina State, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and at 
Duke University in Durham. A well staffed unit of the Ground Water divi- 
sion of the U. S. Geological Survey is housed nearby on the campus and is 
available for consultation. 

Metallurgical Engineering 

The rapid development of space and nuclear technology and attendant 
materials problems has brought about a sharp increase in the demand for 
trained leaders in the materials fields. There is at present intense emphasis 
on advanced study and research on the fundamental behavior of metals and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 157 

alloys. From this work will come urgently-needed improvements in metallic 
materials of construction to withstand increasingly drastic service require- 
ments—higher stresses, higher temperatures, corrosive and radioactive en- 
vironments. 

Opportunities for men with graduate training in metallurgy and metallur- 
gical engineering are almost unlimited. Industry and universities today need 
approximately four times as many metallurgists with advanced degrees as 
are available. It has been estimated that by 1975 the electrical, chemical, 
aircraft, and nuclear industries will require 50,000 research metallurgists and 
metallurgical engineers. The number presently available is approximately 
8,000. Present ratios indicate that one-third to one-half of the 50,000 grad- 
uates needed should have advanced training beyond the bachelor's degree. 
The shortage of graduates with advanced degrees is further accentuated by 
the need for qualified college faculty members to provide adequate instruc- 
tion in metallurgical and related fields. 

North Carolina State is one of the few institutions in the South, and the 
only institution in North Carolina, prepared to offer graduate instruction in 
metallurgical engineering. In addition to the advanced work in metallurgical 
engineering, the School of Engineering also offers an excellent program of 
supporting courses at the graduate level in the related fields of physics, 
chemistry, mathematics, engineering mechanics, and in mechanical, chemical, 
ceramic, and nuclear engineering. 

Ceramic Engineering 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MIC 415, MIC 416, Ceramic Engineering Design 3-3 

Prerequisites: MIC 306, EM 301 

A two-semester study to encourage creative solutions to problems of current 
interest and need in the ceramic profession. Discussion of sources of data, 
design principles, creativity, optimization, economic value analysis and 
decision making. Individual and team study involving interdependence of 
plant layout, processes, equipment and materials in the design of engineer- 
ing systems or sub-systems. Study of factors in utilization of ceramics in 
materials systems. 

MIC 425. Seminar 1-1 

One Semester Required of Seniors in Ceramic Engineering 
A Second Semester May Be Elected 

Literature survey of selected topics in ceramic engineering. Oral and writ- 
ten reports, discussions. 

MIC 430. Research and Control Methods 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIC 306 

Interpretation of results, instrumental methods applied to research and 

product development. Statistical quality control. 

MIC 431. Reaction Kinetics in Ceramic Systems 0-4 

Prerequisites: MIM 201, CH 431 

A study of reactions taking place during thermal treatment of ceramic 



158 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

systems. Such topics as thermodynamics, heterogeneous phase equilibria, 
diffusion, solid state reactions, nucleation and grain growth are treated. 

MIC 432. Glass Phase 4-0 

Prerequisite: MIC 431 

A study of the glassy state to include the structure, properties, and types of 
glasses (including glazes and enamels) . Opacity, color, and devitrification. 
Nature of the glassy phase in kiln fired ceramics. 

MIC 433. Ceramic Microstructure and Properties 0-4 

Prerequisite: MIC 431 

A study of the properties and behavior of processed ceramics from the 
standpoint of their phase characterization, atomic, micro-and macrostructure. 
Characteristics of ceramics are interpreted in terms of basic mechanisms af- 
fecting thermal, electronic, magnetic, mechanical, optical and nuclear 
properties. Emphasis is placed on process treatment and environmental 
effects. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIC 501, MIC 502. Ceramic Structural Analysis 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIG 331 

Basic laws of crystal structures. Arrangement of ions in crystals. Estimation 
of phases present in multi-coponent systems utilizing x-ray techniques. 
Analysis of glass structure. Correlation of structure with composition and 
properties. Mr. Hamme. 

MIC 503. Ceramic Microscopy 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 331 

Transmitted and reflected light techniques for the systematic study of ceramic 

materials and products. Interpretation and representation of results. 

Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 506. Electron Microscopy 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 503 or PY 404 or EE 507 

The theory of the realization of electrostatic and magnetic lenses for elec- 
tron microscopy. Major emphasis is placed on interpretation of electron dif- 
fraction and surface replications of ceramics and metals. Mr. Lucier. 

MIC 509. High Vacuum Technology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CH 433 or ME 301 

Properties of low pressure gases and vapors. Production, maintenance, and 
measurement of high vacuum; design, construction, and operation of high 
vacuum, high temperature facilities. Properties and reactions of materials 
which are processed, tested, and/or utilized in high vacuum environments. 

Mr. Palmour. 

MIC 527. Refractories in Service 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of the more important re- 
fractories in respect to their environment in industrial and laboratory fur- 
naces. Mr. Kriegel. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 159 

MIC 529. Properties of High Temperature Materials 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIM 201 

Effect of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties 
of inorganic materials; relationships between microstructure and high tem- 
perature properties; uses of ceramics, cermets, and metals at extremely high 
temperatures. Mr. Stoops. 

MIC 533, MIC 534. Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design 3-3 

Prerequisites: MIC 416, MIC 433 

Advanced studies in analysis and design of ceramic products, processes, and 
systems leading to original solutions of current industrial problems and 
the development of new concepts of manufacturing. Mr. Palmour. 

MIC 540. Glass Technology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 432 

Fundamentals of glass manufacture including compositions, properties and 

application of the principle types of commercial glasses. Mr. Kriegel. 

MIC 548. Technology of Cements 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 431 

The technology of the Portland cement industry including manufacture, 

control and uses. Mr. Kriegel. 

MIC 596, MIC 597. Advanced Ceramic Experiments 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIC 430 or Equivalent 

Advanced studies in ceramic laboratory experimentation. Graduate Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

MIC 601. Ceramic Phase Relationships 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

Heterogeneous equilibrium, phase transformations, dissociation, fusion, lat- 
tice energy, defect structure, thermodynamic properties of ionic phases and 
silicate melts. Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 603. Advanced Ceramic Reaction Kinetics 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 431, MIC 501 

Fundamental study of the kinetics of high temperature ceramic reactions 
such as diffusion, nucleation, grain growth, recrystalization, phase transfor- 
mation, vitrification and sintering. Mr. Stoops. 

MIC 611. Ceramic Process Analysis 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 502 
Corequisite: ST 516 

Analysis of experimental and production data for ceramic processes* 
Quantitative evaluation of the effect of materials, materials preparation, 
heat distribution, composition, and other variables on properties. Sampling 
from production. Linear programing to compound glass and cement batches. 

Mr. Hackler. 



160 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MIC 621. The Vitreous State 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIC 540 

An advanced study of the structure of binary and ternary silicate and borate 

glasses. Influence of structure on properties of vitreous systems. 

Mr. Hackler. 

MIC 631, MIC 632. Advanced Physical Ceramics I, II 3-3 

Corequisites: MIC 501, MIC 502 or M1M 521, MIM 522, EM 501, EM 502 or 
PY 503, PY 552 

Lattice structures and lattice energies in crystalline ceramics; relationships 
with elastic, optical, and thermal properties. Effects of constitution and 
microstructure on lattice-sensitive properties. The defect crystalline state 
in ceramics: vacancies, color centers, dislocations, boundaries. Crystal growth. 
Plastic deformation processes, including creep and fatigue; the ductile- 
brittle transition. Structure-sensitive properties of cystalline, vitreous and 
composite ceramics; effects of constitution, microstructure, non-stoichiometry. 

Mr. Palmour. 

MIC 635, MIC 636. Electronic Ceramics 3-3 

Prerequisites: MA 441 and PY 407 or PY 414 or EE 531 
Lattice energy, dielectric and optical properties of insulators, ferroelectrics, 
magnetic oxides, electron distribution in insulators and semiconductors; 
electronic properties of alkali halides. Mr. Stadelmaier. 

MIC 695. Ceramic Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Reports and discussion of special topics in ceramic engineering and allied 
fields. Graduate Staff. 

MIC 697. Special Studies in Ceramic Engineering 1 to 3 Credits 

Per Semester 

Special studies of advanced topics in ceramic engineering. Credit will vary 
with the topic. Graduate Staff. 

MIC 699. Ceramic Research Credits By Arrangement 

An original and independent investigation in ceramic engineering. A report 
of such an investigation is required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff. 



Geological Engineering 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MIG 415. Mineral Exploration and Evaluation 0-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 440, MIG 452 

Application of the principles of geology, geophysics, and geochemistry to 
the discovery and evaluation of mineral deposits. Design of mineral ex- 
ploration and development programs based on knowledge of the unique 
thermodynamic, geochemical, and tectonic features that control mineral 
formation and concentrations in well known mining districts, especially 
those yielding ferrous, base, and precious metals. Review of economic and 
technological factors governing the value of mineral deposits. 

MIG 440. Endogenic Materials and Processes 0-4 

Prerequisites: MIG 220, MIG 331 

Minerals, rocks, and mineral deposits that are formed at high temperatures 

and pressures by crystallization or solidification of molten magma, or by 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 

solid state recrystallization of older rocks. Application of principles of 
thermodynamics and of phase-rule chemistry, and the results of modern high 
pressure-temperature laboratory research on the stability fields of crystalline 
phases, to an understanding of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Identifica- 
tion, classification, occurrence, origin, and economic value of the principal 
igneous and metamorphic rocks. 

MIG 452. Exogenic Materials and Processes 4-0 

Prerequisites: MIG 220, MIG 331 

Identification, classification, geologic occurrence, origin, and economic value 
of minerals, rocks, and mineral deposits formed by physical, chemical, and 
biological processes at low temperatures and pressures at and near the 
earth's surface. Hydrodynamics of sediment transport and deposition, settling 
velocities and size sorting, chemical and biochemical precipitation from 
aqueous solutions, principles of division of stratified terranes into natural 
units, correlation of strata, identification of depositional environments, and 
fades analysis. 

MIG 461. Engineering Geology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 120 or MIG 220 

The application of geologic principles to engineering practice; analysis of 
geological factors and processes affecting specific engineering projects. 

MIG 462. Geological Surveying 0-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, MIG 440, MIG 452 

Required of Seniors in Geological Engineering 

Methods of field observation and use of geologic surveying instruments in 

surface and underground work; representation of geologic features by maps, 

sections and diagrams. Lectures, laboratories, and field work. 

MIG 465. Geological Field Procedures 6 Summer 

Prerequisite: MIG 351 or Special Permission 

A six week summer field course. Practical field procedures and instruments 
commonly used to procure geologic data for evaluating mineral deposits, 
solving engineering problems involving earth materials, and drawing scien- 
tific conclusions. Observation of geologic phenomena in their natural setting. 
Large and intermediate scale geologic mapping of surface features and large 
scale mapping underground in mine workings. 

MIG 472. Elements of Mining Engineering 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIG 220 and at Least Junior Standing in Geological Engi- 
neering. 

Introduction to mining; surface and underground methods of development 
and production; explosives, drilling and blasting; ore loading, transport, 
and hoisting; drainage and ventilation; mine surveying and sampling; fire 
assaying; mining law, organization, administration, and safety. Lectures, 
laboratory and field inspections. 



162 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIG 522. Petroleum Geology 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 452 

Properties, origin and modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. 
Geologic and economic features of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly 
in the United States. Mr. Leith. 

MIG 552. Exploratory Geophysics 0-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 351, PY 202 

Fundamental principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure and 
instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical, and 
other methods of studying geological structures and conditions. Spontaneous 
potential, resistivity, radioactivity, temperature, and other geophysical logging 
methods. Study of applications and interpretations of results. 

Mr. Leith. 

MIG 563. Applied Sedimentology 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIG 452 

Advanced treatment of the geological aspects of erosion and sediment trans- 
port and deposition, especially as related to engineering works, and to land 
and water utilization. Analysis of physical, mineralogical, and some chemical 
properties of sediments and sedimentary rocks; interpretation of these prop- 
erties in terms of depositional basins and environments. Mr. Leith. 

MIG 565. Hydrogeology 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIG 452 

Occurrence and sources of surface and subsurface water. Relationship of 
surface water to subsurface water. Rock properties affecting infiltration, 
movement, lateral and vertical distribution, and quality of ground water. 
Determination of permeability, capacity, specific yield, and other hydraulic 
characteristics of quifers. Principles of well field design. Legal aspects of 
water supplies. Mr. Hood. 

MIG 567. Geochemistry 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 231 or CH 433 

The quantitative distribution of elements in the earth's crust, the hydro- 
sphere, and the atmosphere. Application of the laws of chemical equilibruim 
and resultant chemical reactions to natural earth systems. Geochemical ap- 
plications of Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical cycles. Isotope geochemistry. 

Mr. Hood. 

MIG 571, MIG 572. Mining and Minerol Dressing 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIG 472 

Principles of the mineral industry; mining laws, prospecting, sampling, de- 
velopment, drilling, blasting, handling, ventilation and safety; administra- 
tion, surveying, assaying; preparation, benefication and marketing. 

Graduate Staff. 

MIG 581. Geomorphology 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIG 452 

A systematic study of land forms and their relations to processes and 
stages of development and adjustment to underlying structure. Lectures, 
map interpretations, and field trips. Mr. Brown. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 163 

MIG 593. Advanced Topics in Geological Engineering 1 to 6-1 to 6 

Prerequisite: Permission of Staff 

Special study of some advanced phases of geological engineering. 

Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MIG 611, MIG 612. Advanced Economic Geology 3-3 

Prerequisites: MIG 440, MIG 452 

Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Mr. Brown. 

MIG 632. Microscopic Determination of Opaque Minerals 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: MIG 331 

Identification of metallic, opaque minerals in polished sections by physical 

properties, etch reactions and microchemical tests. Laboratories. 

Mr. Brown. 

MIG 642. Advanced Petrography 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: MIG 331, MIG 440 

Application of the petrographic microscope to the systematic study of the 
composition and origin of rocks; emphasis on igneous and metamorphic 
rocks. Graduate Staff. 

MIG 695. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Scientific articles, progress reports and special problems of interest to geol- 
ogists and geological and mining engineers discussed. 

Graduate Staff. 

MIG 699. Geological Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor 

Lectures, reading assignments, and reports; special work in Geology to 

meet the needs and interests of the students. Graduate Staff. 



Metallurgical Engineering 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

MIM 401, MIM 402. Metallurgical Operations I, II 4-4 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

A systematized treatment of the fundamental operations involved in the 
production and fabrication of metals and alloys. Part I deals primarily with 
procedures and operations employed in chemical or extractive metallurgy. 
Part II covers the operations of physical and mechanical metallurgy. 

MIM 421, MIM 422. Metallurgy I, II 2-2 

Prerequisite: CH 102 
Required of Seniors in M.E. and M.E.A. 

The constitution, structure and properties of engineering ferrous and non- 
ferrous metals and alloys; influences of mechanical working and heat treat- 
ment; physical testing, corrosion and its prevention. 

MIM 423. Metallurgical Laboratory 1 or 1 

Corequisite: MIM 421 or MIM 422 

Laboratory work to accompany Metallurgy I, II. 



164 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MIM 431, MIM 432. Metallography I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 332 

An intensive study of the principles and techniques for examination and 

correlation of the structure, constitution, and properties of metals and 

alloys. 

MIM 451, MIM 452. Metallurgical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Metallurgical Engineering 

Reports and discussion of special topics in metallurgical engineering and 

related subjects. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

MIM 521, MIM 522. Advanced Physical Metallurgy I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

Theories concerning behavior and control of engineering alloys, reaction 
rates in the solid state, and alloy influences; current heat treating practices; 
surface treatments; behavior of metals at high and low temperatures; special 
purpose alloys; powder metallurgy; review of modern equipment and meth- 
ods for the study of metals. Mr. Stadelmaier. 

MIM 523, MIM 524. Metallurgical Factors in Design 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A study of the metallurgical factors that must be considered in using metals 

in design. Mr. Austin. 

MIM 541, MIM 542. Principles of Corrosion I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electro-chemical 
nature of corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, 
methods of corrosion protection. Laboratory work included. 

Mr. Austin. 

MIM 561. Advanced Structure and Properties of Materials 3-0 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 

A systematic treatment of the fundamental physico-chemical principles gov- 
erning the constitution of both metallic and ceramic materials. Correlation 
of these principles with physical, mechanical and chemical properties of 
materials. Particular emphasis is placed upon materials of construction for 
nuclear reactors. Lecture and Laboratory. Mr. Austin. 

MIM 562. Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering 0-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 561 

Engineering aspects of problems involved in the selection and application 
of reactor materials. Specific attention is given to elevated temperature 
behavior, fatigue, corrosion, irradiation damage, and the fabrication and 
processing of these materials. Lecture and Laboratory. Graduate Staff. 

MIM 595, MIM 596. Advanced Metallurgical Experiments I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 422 or Approval of Instructor 

Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project 
dealing with metallurgy or metallography. A seminar period is provided, and 
a written report is required. Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 165 

Courses for Graduates Only 

MIM 651, MIM 652. Theory and Structure of Metals 3-3 

Prerequisite: MIM 522 

An advanced interpretation of the development of theories of the metallic 
state with emphasis on modern physical concepts. Topics include theory of 
crystallinity, bonding forces, stability of metallic structures, diffusion, and 
dislocation theory. Mr. Stadelmaier. 

MIM 699. Metallurgical Engineering Research Credits by Arrangement 

Independent investigation of an appropriate problem in Metallurgical 
Engineering. A report on this investigation is required as a graduate thesis. 

Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: George W. Poland, Head, Edward M. Stack 

The Department of Modern Languages courses listed below are recom- 
mended to assist graduate students in preparing themselves for the use of 
modern foreign languages in research and advanced study. Students are 
given the opportunity of working a translation project in connection with 
their subject of major interest. They are encouraged particularly to seek 
in this instance useful foreign research related to thesis or other research 
in progress. Although these courses do not carry graduate language credit, 
they may be taken as a means of attaining a reading knowledge. 

Certification may be obtained in languages not normally taught by the 
department with special permission of the Graduate School. 

MLR 101, MLR 102. Russian 3-3 

These two courses are given for graduate students only, the first dealing with 
grammar and structure and the second with reading of Russian scientific ma- 
terial. 

MLF 401. French Grammar for Graduate Students 3-3 

This course is designed to present the grammar of scientific French as rapidly 
as possible in preparation for the reading course which follows. 

MLF 402. Scientific French 3-3 

Prerequisite: MLF 401 or Equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical French, supplemented by discussions on 
terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic techniques. 
Subject material adjusted to individual needs; conferences. 

MLS 401. Spanish Grammar for Graduate Students 3-3 

This course is designed to present the grammar of scientific Spanish as rapidly 
as possible in preparation for the reading course which follows. 

MLS 402. Scientific Spanish 3-3 

Prerequisite: MLS 401 or Equivalent 

Reading and translation of technical Spanish, supplemented by discussions 
on terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic tech- 
niques. Subject material adjusted to individual needs; conferences. 



166 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MLG 401. German Grammar for Graduate Students 3-3 

This course is designed to present the grammar of scientific German as 
rapidly as possible in preparation for the reading course which follows. 

MLG 402. Scientific German 3-3 

Prerequisite: MLG 401 

Reading and translation of technical German, supplemented by discussions 
on terminology, word order, vocabulary analysis and other linguistic tech- 
niques. Subject material adjusted to individual needs; conferences. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Raymond LeRoy Murray., Head, Harold Augustus Lamonds* 

Affiliated Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Wesley Osborne Doggett, Physics, James K. Ferrell, Chemical 
Engineering, Arthur W. Waltner, Physics 

Associate Professors: Alonzo Freeman Coots, Chemistry, Munir R. El-Saden. 
Necati Ozisik, Mechanical Engineering, Edward George Manning, Elec- 
trical Engineering 

Assistant Professors: Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, Chemistry, Robert Walter 
Lade, Electrical Engineering 

The Department of Nuclear Engineering offers graduate study leading 
to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Courses and research are available within the department and cooperating 
departments in several areas of nuclear engineering, including reactor theory 
and analysis, radiation attenuation and detection, energy transfer and con- 
version, nuclear materials, and instrumentation. 

Among the available research facilities are a 100-kilowatt heterogeneous 
reactor, a pulsed positive ion Van de Graaff accelerator, digital and analog 
computers, a high pressure heat transfer loop, and plasma physics labora- 
tories. Close associations are maintained with many departments in the 
School of Engineering and the School of Physical Sciences and Applied 
Mathematics. 

Candidates for admission are expected to hold the bachelor's degree in 
one of the fields of engineering or the physical sciences. Experience in 
nuclear physics, advanced differential equations, and basic reactor theory 
will reduce the time required for completion of the degree. Courses in these 
areas can be included in the initial phases of the graduate program. Thirty 
credit hours (including four for research) and a thesis are required for the 
Master of Science degree. Especially well-qualified students may study 
directly toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

The Department of Nuclear Engineering participates in the Nuclear Sci- 
ence and Engineering Fellowship Program of the Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion. Students are also eligible for fellowships from the Ford Foundation, 
the National Science Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Agency, and others. A few half-time graduate assistantships are available 
in which a nine credit-hour load per semester is permitted. 

* On leave until July, 1964. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 167 

Graduates of the department find positions in industry, government, and 
academic institutions. Opportunities include analysis, design, utilization, 
and operation of nuclear facilities associated with the nuclear aerospace pro- 
gram, power reactors, research reactors, and radioisotopes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

NE 404. Nuclear Energy Conversion I 0-3 

Prerequisite: ChE 421 or equivalent 

Basic principles of the transformation of nuclear energy into useful forms. 
Considers the reactor as a heat source for a heat engine cycle. Description 
and analysis of various reactor concepts and associated power plants. 

NE 405. Nuclear Energy Conversion II 3-0 

Prerequisite: ChE 422 or equivalent 

Basic principles of the transformation of nuclear energy into useful forms. 
Considers isotope production and utilization, direct conversion techniques, 
nuclear propulsion concepts, research reactors, and breeder reactors. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

NE 501. Nuclear Reactor Theory I 3-0 

Corequisite: PY 410 

An introductory course in reactor theory including the fission process, 
neutron energy distribution, lethargy, neutron slowing and interactions, 
diffusion, Fermi age theory, the diffusion equation, criticality conditions, 
and reactor instrumentation. Mr. Verghese. 

NE 502. Nuclear Reactor Theory II 0-3 

Prerequisite: NE 501 

Continuation of reactor theory from NE 501. Topics include: treatment 
of reactor parameters for homogeneous and heterogeneous reactors, reflected 
reactors, multi-group theory, reactor kinetics, temperature effects, control 
rod theory, perturbation theory, and transport theory. Mr. Verghese. 

NE 503. Nuclear Engineering Systems 0-3 

Prerequisite: NE 501 

Considers reactor as a system including aspects of reactor control, radiation 

protection, shielding, and thermal design. Mr. Carnesale. 

NE 511. Radiation Detection and Analysis 2-2 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

Interaction of radiation with detectors. Characteristics of detectors and 
analysis equipment. Statistics of the counting process. Emphasis is on prepara- 
tion for use of radiation counting equipment for research. Mr. Verghese. 

NE 530. Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The principles of neutron motion in matter, with emphasis on the analysis 
of the nuclear chain reactor. Slowing of neutrons, diffusion, space distri- 
butions of flux, conditions for criticality, group theories, and the time-de- 
pendent behavior of fissionable assemblies. Graduate Staff. 



168 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NE 531. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory 1-1 

Prerequisite: NE 530 or NE 501 

Observation and measurements of static and dynamic nuclear reactor be- 
havior, the effectiveness of control and temperature, and correlation with 
theory. Experiments on the motion and detection of neutrons and gamma 
rays, with emphasis on the research uses of nuclear reactor radiations. 

Graduate Staff. 

NE 540. Nuclear Reactor Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: NE 502 or NE 530 

Considers non-steady-state reactor behavior including reactivity effects due 
to temperature, poisoning, and control rods. Uses elementary servomechanism 
theory in treating reactor as a control element. Treats automatic control 
including control mechanisms and dynamic effect of power plant character- 
istics. Mr. Leonard. 

NE 545. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics 3-0 

Prerequisite: NE 502 or NE 530 

The kinetic behavior of nuclear reactors is carefully analyzed from both 
theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Solutions of the basic kinetic 
equations are developed and applied to specific reactor behavior. Tempera- 
ture, void, and xenon poisoning effects are considered. Digital and analog 
computer techniques are discussed and utilized. Correlation of theory with 
observed reactor behavior is made and safety considerations in reactor de- 
sign are discussed. Mr. Leonard. 

NE 591, NE 592. Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II 3-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor 

These courses will be used to explore unusual and/or specialized areas of 

nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff. 



Courses for Graduates Only 

NE 619. Reactor Theory and Analysis I 3-0 

Prerequisite: NE 502 or NE 530 

The theory of neutron slowing, resonance capture, Doppler effect, and 

thermal flux distributions in heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Analysis of 

reactor control by temperature, effects of localized and distributed absorbers, 

fission products, fuel consumption and production. One-velocity neutron 
transport theory. Mr. Murray. 

NE 620. (PY 620) Nuclear Radiation Attenuation 3-0 

Prerequisites: NE 502 or NE 530 or PY 510, MA 512 

The physical theory and mathematical treatment of the penetration of neu- 
trons, gamma-rays, and charged particles in matter. Gamma-ray transport 
theory. Analysis of experimental methods for obtaining penetration data. 

Mr. Doggett. 

NE 630. Reactor Theory and Analysis II 0-3 

Prerequisite: NE 502 or NE 530 

The theory of neutron multiplication in uniform media with several dimen- 
sions, regions, and neutron energy groups. Reactor control by absorbers, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 169 

time dependent reactor behavior, matrix treatment of perturbation theory, 
neutron thermalization, energy dependent neutron transport theory, and 
multigroup machine methods. Mr. Murray. 

NE 691, NE 692. Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, 11 3-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor 

A study of recent developments in nuclear engineering theory and practice. 

Graduate Staff. 

NE 695. Seminar in Nuclear Engineering 1-1 

Discussion of selected topics in nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff. 

NE 699. Research in Nuclear Engineering Credits by Arrangement 

Individual research in the field of nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF 

OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE 

(See School of Education) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 
Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PHI 401. Symbolic Logic 3 or 3 

Modern methods in logic involving formalized expression that avoids in- 
herent difficulties and ambiguities of ordinary language and make possible 
greater effectiveness in handling complex material. 

REL 403. Religions of the World 3 or 3 

Background, general characteristics, and basic teachings of the major living 
religions of the world; consideration of contemporary secular movements 
that are in a sense religions. 

PHI 405. Foundations of Science 3 or 3 

Nature and validity of knowledge, basic concepts of modern science, scien- 
tific method, and the implications of the philosophy of modern science for 
ethics, social philosophy, and the nature of reality. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Dudley Williams, Head, Willard Harrison Bennett, Wesley 
Osborne Doggett, Harry Charles Kelly, Forrest Wesley Lancaster, 
Edward Manring, Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Arthur Clayton Menius, 
Jr., Raymond Leroy Murray, Arthur W. Waltner 

Professor Emeritus: Rufus Hummer Snyder 

Associate Professors: William Robert Davis, Joseph Thomas Lynn, Grad- 
uate Administrator 

Assistant Professors: Grover Cleveland Cobb, Jr., Gerald Howard Katzin, 
David Hamilton Martin, Marvin Kent Moss, Jae Young Park, Richard 
Roland Patty 



170 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Study in physics leading to the degrees Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy is available. Courses, staff, and facilities are provided for presen- 
tation of the fundamental subject matter of physics and for specialized study 
and research in several areas, as listed below: 

(a) Nuclear Physics: Theoretical and experimental work in the fields of 
low energy charged-particle physics, neutron physics, and the statis- 
tical behavior of nuclear processes. 

(b) Space Physics: Research on phenomena in the upper atmosphere and 
interplanetary space. 

(c) Plasma Physics: Studies of basic ionic processes and applications to 
thermonuclear research. 

(d) Infrared Studies: Research on transmission of radiation through plane- 
tary atmospheres and spectroscopic investigations of molecular and 
solid-state structures. 

(e) Lasers: Theoretical and experimental work on the irradiation of laser 
crystals, and studies relating to new laser materials. 

(f) Theoretical Physics: Theory of fields, non-inertial systems, nuclear 

structure and interactions, plasmas, molecular spectroscopy, and solid 
state. 

Recommended programs of study with emphasis on fundamental physics 
or on nuclear science leading to the Master of Science degree are available. 
A minimum of 30 semester credits is required, which is to include 4 credits 
for research and 2 for seminar. Research and presentation of a thesis are 
required. Graduates are prepared for college teaching and for research 
and development activity in general physics or in the space, missile, and 
energy conversion programs of our country. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted on successful completion of 
examinations, independent research, and the submission of a dissertation. 
A minor in mathematics or other area in science is normally elected. 

All graduate students and staff are expected to attend a weekly depart- 
mental colloquium at which topics of current interest in physics are discus- 
sed. 

Extensive laboratory facilities are available for research in the areas of 
specialization. These facilities include: 

(a) A 1-mev Van de Graaff accelerator with pulsing equipment for 
study of neutron scattering, polarization, and diffusion. 

(b) A hypersonic ionic wind tunnel for study of simulated space environ- 
ments. 

(c) Fully equipped laboratories (supported by a glass blowing and tube 
making facility) for the investigation of the stability of ionic streams 
and the measurement of plasma phenomena by ultrasonic methods. 

(d) Laboratories for research in magneto-optical effects, radiation detec- 
tion, radiation dosimetry, and laser research. 

(e) Laboratories for infrared spectroscopy and studies of synthetic plane- 
tary atmospheres. 

(f) The IBM 1410 Tape System, located in the Computing Center, is 
available for use in research by graduate students. The Computing 
Center also offers non-credit short courses in FORTRAN program- 
ming. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 171 

The Department of Physics participates in the Nuclear Science and Engi- 
neering Fellowship program of the Atomic Energy Commission, and Fellow- 
ships in Health Physics are currently available under a continuing grant 
from the U. S. Public Health Service. Students are also eligible for fellow- 
ships from the Ford Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and 
others. Research assistantships are available supported by grants or con- 
tracts with federal agencies, and a number of openings for halftime teach- 
ing assistantships in general and intermediate physics is available each 
year. 

Research work on nuclear chain reacting systems and on the attenuation 
of nuclear radiation in matter is conducted cooperatively with the Depart- 
ment of Nuclear Engineering. Research in biophysics is done cooperatively 
with the Institute of Statistics. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PY 407. Introduction to Modern Physics 3-3 

Prerequisites: PY 207 or PY 208, MA 202 

A survey of the important developments in atomic and nuclear physics of 
this century. Among topics covered are: atomic and molecular structure, 
determination of properties of ions and fundamental particles, the origin 
of spectra, ion accelerators, and nuclear reactions. 

PY 410. Nuclear Physics I 4-4 

Prerequisite: PY 407 

An introduction to the properties of the nucleus, and the interaction of 
radiation with matter. A quantitative description is given of natural and 
artificial radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission, fusion, and the structure 
of simple nuclei. 

PY 411, PY 412. Mechonics 3-3 

Prerequisites: PY 207 or PY 208, MA 301 

A sequence of courses in intermediate theoretical mechanics, including the 
dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, gravitation, moving reference systems, 
and the physics of continuous media. An introduction is given to advanced 
mechanics, including DAlembert's Principle and Lagrange's equations of 
motion, with applications. Two hours of lecture, and a laboratory or problem 
period each week. 

PY 413. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 207 or PY 208, MA 301 

An intermediate course in the principles of classical thermodynamics and 
the kinetic theory of gases with an introduction to statistical mechanics. 
Topics covered include equations of state, entropy, Maxwellian distribu- 
tions, transport processes, and the statistics of Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose- 
Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac. Two hours of lecture, and a laboratory or prob- 
lem period each week. 

PY 414, PY 415. Electricity and Magnetism 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 207 or PY 208 

Corequisite: MA 441 

An intermediate course in the fundamentals of static and dynamic electricity 

and electromagnetic theory, developed from basic experimental laws. Vector 



172 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

methods are introduced and employed throughout the course. Two hours of 
lecture, and a laboratory or problem period each week. 

PY 416. Optics 3-0 

Prerequisite: PY 415 

An intermediate course in physical and geometrical optics with the major 
emphasis on the wave properties of light. Two hours of lecture, and a 
laboratory or problem period each week. 

PY 499. Special Problems in Physics 1 to 3 - 1 to 3 

Prerequisite: Permission of Department 

Study and research in special topics of classical and modern physics. Ex- 
perimental measurements with emphasis on the treatment and interpretation 
of data, literature surveys, or theoretical investigations. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PY 501. Wave Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 407, MA 441, and either PY 411 or PY 414 
An introduction to the foundations of quantum and wave mechanics, with 
solutions of the problems of the free particle, harmonic oscillator, rigid 
rotating molecule, and the hydrogen atom. Approximation methods are 
developed for more complex atomic systems. Mr. Cobb. 

PY 503. Introduction to Theoretical Physics 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 412, PY 414, MA 441 

An introductory course in theoretical physics which offers preparation for 
graduate study. Emphasis is on classical mechanics, special relativity, and 
the motion of charged particles. Topics which are covered include the 
variational principles of mechanics, Hamilton's equations, canonical trans- 
formations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, and the theory of small vibrations. 

Mr. Moss. 

PY 507. Advanced Atomic Physics 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 412, PY 415, MA 441 

A study of atomic structure and spectra, with emphasis on the analysis of 
spectra. Topics include: the alkali spectra, multiplet structure, electron spin, 
hyperfine structure, moments. Mr. Cobb. 

PY 508. Ionization in Gases 3-0 

Prerequisite: PY 414 

Statistical theory of particles, excitation and ionization in gases; mobilities 
and conductivities; processes at solid surfaces in ionized gases; characteris- 
tic forms of electrical discharges in gases. Mr. Bennett. 

PY 509. Plasma Physics 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 508 

Individual and collective motion of charged particles in electric and mag- 
netic fields and through ionized gases. Pinch effect, relativistic streams, 
conductivities, and runaway electrons. Astrophysical concepts and approxi- 
mations. Properties of plasmas, including waves, confinement, instabilities 
and shocks, with applications. Mr. Bennett. 

PY 510. Nuclear Physics II 4-0 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The description and analysis of nuclear energy levels, meson theory, nuclear 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 173 

resonance, atomic and molecular magnetism, and cosmic radiation. Prin- 
ciples and experiments in neutron physics are discussed. In the laboratory 
work, emphasis is placed on gaining experience in independent research. 

Mr. Waltner. 

PY 514, PY 515. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 415 

An advanced treatment of electricity and magnetism and electromagnetic 
theory. Topics include: techniques for the solution of potential problems; 
development of Maxwell's equations; wave equations; energy, force, and 
momentum relations of an electromagnetic field; covariant formulation of 
electrodynamics; radiation from accelerated charges. Mr. Katzin. 

PY 518. Radiation Hazard and Protection 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

Principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation dose units. Radiation hazards 
to man. Maximum permissible levels of exposure to external and to internal 
sources of radiation. Methods of providing protection. Graduate Staff. 

PY 520. Physical Measurements in Radioactivity 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 410 

The principles of experimental measurements on radioactive materials are 
presented and demonstrated through laboratory work. Emphasis is placed 
on the analytical interpretation of experimental data. Mr. Lynn. 

PY 552. Introduction to the Structure of Solids 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 407 
Corequisite: PY 501 

Basic considerations of crystalline solids, metals, conductors, and semi-con- 
ductors. Mr. Doggett. 

PY 555. (See MA 555. Principles of Astrodynamics) 

PY 599. Senior Research 3-3 

Prerequisite: Senior Honors Program Standing, Except with Special 

Permission 

Investigations in physics under the guidance of staff members. Literature 

reviews, experimental measurements, or theoretical studies. A project report 

is required. Graduate Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PY 601, PY 602. Theoretical Physics 3-3 

Prerequisites: PY 503, PY 514 

Corequisite: MA 661 

Mathematical and theoretical approach to the relationships between various 

branches of physics. The restricted theory of relativity, electrodynamics, the 

theory of electrons, classical field theory, and the general theory of relativity 

are treated. Mr. Davis. 

PY 610. Advanced Nuclear Physics 0-3 

Prerequisite: PY 510 

Corequisite: PY 611 

A theoretical study of nuclear structure and reactions. Topics include: the 



174 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

deuteron, low-energy nucleon-nucleon scattering, nuclear forces, nuclear 
moments, nuclear shell theory, collective model, compound nucleus, optical 
model, and direct reactions. Mr. Park. 

PY 611. Quantum Mechanics 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 501, MA 512 

Theory of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic and molecular 
structure, scattering phenomena, and a semi-classical treatment of the 
interaction of radiation with matter. Mr. Davis. 

PY 612. Advanced Quantum Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 601, PY 611 

Dirac's relativistic electron theory, elementary scalar and vector meson field 
theory. Introduction to quantum electrodynamics and the general theory 
of quantized fields. Mr. Davis. 

PY 620. (See NE 620. Nuclear Radiation Attenuation.) 

PY 621. Kinetic Theory of Gases 3-0 

Prerequisites: PY 501, PY 503, MA 512 

The theory of molecular motions, including velocity and density distribution 
functions; the phenomena of viscosity, heat conduction, and diffusion; equa- 
tions of state; fluctuations. Graduate Staff. 

PY 622. Statistical Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 413, PY 503 
Corequisite: PY 611 

A treatment of classical and quantum statistical mechanics with some ap- 
plications to thermodynamics. Topics include: statistics of Maxwell-Boltz- 
mann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose-Einstein, canonical ensembles and grand 
canonical ensembles, ideal Fermi gas, and cooperative phenomena. 

Mr. Park. 

PY 641. Non-lnertial Space Mechanics 0-3 

Prerequisites: PY 601, MA 661 
Corequisite: PY 602 

The theoretical description of the phenomena of mechanics relating to 
non-inertial frames of reference with emphasis on applications to space 
travel and the instrumentation problems of rocketry. Applications to inertial 
guidance and electromagnetic-inertial coupling effects are also considered. 

Mr. Davis. 

PY 695. Seminar 1-1 

Reports on topics of current interest in physics. Several sections are offered 
so that students with common research interests may be grouped together. 

Graduate Staff. 

PY 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake research in some 
selected field of physics. Graduate Staff. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 175 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Don Edwin Ellis, Head, *Jay Lawrence Apple, Robert Aycock, 
Carlyle Newton Clayton, Frank Arlo Haasis, Teddy Theodore 
Hebert, Arthur Kelman, George Blanchard Lucas, Lowell Wendell 
Nielsen, Charles Joseph Nusbaum, Nash Nicks Winstead 

Professor Emeritus: Samuel George Lehman 

Associate Professors: William Earl Cooper, Charles S. Hodges, Jr., David 
M. Kline, Richard Robert Nelson, Nathaniel T. Powell, John Paul 
Ross, Joseph Neal Sasser, Robert T. Sherwood, Hedwig Hirschmann 
Triantaphyllou 

Visiting Professor: Frederick Lovejoy Wellman 

Assistant Professors: Robert Donald Milholland, David Lewis Strider 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Guy Vernon Gooding, Jr. 

The department is equipped with laboratory and greenhouse facilities for 
graduate study in plant pathology including special equipment for all phases 
of phytopathological research. The State's wide range of soil types and 
climatic areas make possible the commercial production of a variety of field, 
vegetable, fruit, and ornamental crops as well as forest trees. Especially favor- 
able opportunities exist for training in diseases caused by nematodes, viruses, 
fungi, and bacteria which affect many crops. Land and facilites for 
experimental work are available at some sixteen permanent research stations 
located throughout the State. Student participation in the Plant Disease 
Clinic provides excellent training and experience in the diagnosis of all 
types of plant diseases. 

Many opportunities for employment in research, extension, and teaching 
are available to persons with the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in plant pathology. There are openings for qualified persons in 
plant pathology research in the United States Department of Agriculture, 
State Experiment Stations and in industry. Opportunities exist in foreign 
service through international and federal organizations as well as commercial 
production enterprises. The rapid development of agricultural chemicals 
for disease control offer numerous opportunities in research, promotion, 
and service activities. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PP 500. Advanced Plant- Pathology 0-2 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or Equivalent 

An advanced study of the economic importance, symptoms, disease cycles, 
epiphytology and control of major groups of plant diseases. Students who 
register for this course are also required to register for either PP 501 or 
PP 502, or they may register for both. Mr. Winstead. 

PP 501. Advanced Plant Pathology Laboratory-Field Crops Diseases 0-1 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or Equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose major interest is diseases of field 

crops to accompany lecture course in Advanced Plant Pathology (PP 500) . 

On leave until November, 1965 



176 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Diseases will be selected for study which are important on field crops. Either 
this course or PP 502 must be taken concurrently with PP 500. 

Mr. Kline. 

PP 502. Advanced Plant Pathology Laboratory-Horticultural Crop Diseases 0-1 

Prerequisite: PP 315 or Equivalent 

Laboratory course for students whose major interest is in diseases of horti- 
cultural crops to accompany lecture course in Advanced Plant Pathology 
(PP 500). Diseases will be selected for study which are important on fruit, 
ornamental and vegetable crops. Either this course or PP 501 must be taken 
concurrently with PP 500. Mr. Winstead. 

PP 503. Disgnosis of Plant Diseases Summer School 3 

Prerequisites: One Advanced Course in Plant Pathology and Permission of 
Instructor 

A study of techniques used in plant disease diagnosis with emphasis on 
diagnostic value of signs and symptoms for certain types of diseases. Con- 
sideration will be given to major sources of descriptive information on plant 
pathogens and the use of keys for the identification of fungi. (Offered 
summer 1964 and in alternate years.) Mr. Hebert. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PP 601. Phytopathology I 4-0 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and Permission of Instructor 

A study of the principles of phytopathological research. The course is de- 
signed to apply the classical scientific method to disease investigation. Exer- 
cises will include appraising disease problems, reviewing literature, labora- 
tory and greenhouse experiments and the evaluation and presentation of 
data. Mr. Apple. 

PP 602. Phytopathology II 0-4 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and Permission of Instructor 

The basic concepts of the etiology, pathology, epiphytology and control of 

plant diseases. Mr. Nusbaum. 

PP 604. Plant Parasitic Nematodes 2-0 

Prerequisite: PP 315 

A study of morphology, anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of plant parasitic 
nematodes. Methods of isolating nematodes from soil and plant parts 
and other laboratory techniques used in the study and identification of 
nematodes will be considered. Mrs. Triantaphyllou. 

PP 605. Plant Virology 3-0 

Prerequisites: PP 315, GN 411, A Course in Organic Chemistry 
A study of plant viruses including effects on host plants, transmission, 
classification, methods of purification, determination of properties, chemical 
nature, structure and multiplication. (Offered 1965-66 and in alternate 
years.) Mr. Hebert. 

PP 607. (GN 607) Genetics of Fungi 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 512, or Equivalent and Permission of Instructor 
Review of major contributions in fungus genetics with emphasis on prin- 
ciples and theories that have evolved in recent developments. (Offered 1964- 
65 and in alternate years.) Mr. Nelson. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 177 

PP 608. History of Phytopathology 1-0 

Prerequisites: PP 315 and Permission of Instructor 

Development of the science of phytopathology from its early beginnings to 
the early part of the 20th century. (Offered 1965-66 and in alternate years.) 

Mr. Ellis. 

PP 609. Current Phytopothological Research Under Field Conditions 0-2 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Study of concepts involved, procedures used, and evaluation made in current 
phytopathological research by Plant Pathology staff. Visits to various Research 
Stations will be made by the class. Mr. Clayton. 

PP 611. Nematode Diseases of Plants 0-3 

Prerequisite: PP 604 

A study of plant diseases caused by nematodes. Special consideration will 
be given to host-parasite relationships, host ranges and life cycles of the 
more important economic species. Principles and methods of control will 
be considered. Mr. Sasser. 

PP 612. Plant Pathogenesis 3-0 

Prerequisites: PP 500 and Permission of Instructor 

A study of interactions of pathogens and suscept plants. The following major 
topics will be considered: hydrolytic enzymes, polysaccharides, and toxins 
in wilting phenomena; mode of action of toxins in altering plant metabo- 
lism; role of growth regulators in hypertrophic responses; alterations in 
respiration and other physiological processes during pathogenesis; and na 
ture and biochemical basis for disease resistance. (Offered 1964-65 and in 
alternate years.) Mr. Kelman. 

PP 690. Seminar in Plant Pathology 1-1 

Prerequisite: Consent of Seminar Chairman 

Discussion of phytopathological topics selected and assigned by seminar 

chairman. Mr. Nielsen. 

PP 699. Research in Plant Pathology Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Consent of Instructor 

Original research in Plant Pathology. Graduate Staff. 

U.N.C. BO 211, BO 212. Advanced Mycology 5-5 

Prerequisite: U. N. C. 42 or BO 101 or Equivalent 

Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti. These 
courses are intended for students who plan to specialize in Mycology, Plant 
Pathology, and Biology. Classwork consists of lectures and student reports on 
literature. Laboratory work consists of the collection and identification of 
fungi and the study of their structure and development, and techniques 
for isolation and pure culture. (Two hours of lecture and four hours of 
laboratory each week.) Mr. Couch. 



178 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Henry Wilburn Garren, Head, Clifford Warren Barber, 
Frank Rankin Craig, Edward Walker Glazener, Charles Horace Hill, 
Jr., Morley Richard Kare, Joseph Wheeler Kelly 
Associate Professors: William Lowry Blow, Freeman Waldo Cook 
Assistant Professors: William E. Donaldson, Robert E. Lubow 

The Department of Poultry Science offers graduate study leading to the 
Master of Science degree in poultry science with major emphasis in either 
genetics, nutrition or physiology. Arrangements also exist whereby Ph.D. 
candidates can be directed by certain staff members of this department. 
Students accepted for graduate study must present evidence of scholastic 
achievement in the basic biological sciences. 

The Department of Poultry Science occupies Scott Hall. This building 
contains well equipped research laboratories, animal rooms, library and 
offices. Additional research facilities are located on the University poultry 
farms and on three outlying farms in the western, Piedmont and eastern 
sections of North Carolina. The research program is comprehensive and 
ranges from fundamental biochemical, physiological and genetic investiga- 
tions to applied agricultural problems. 

Many opportunities, both domestic and foreign, exist for graduates with 
advanced training. These include teaching and research positions in public 
and private educational institutions, Civil Service, and industry. Graduates 
can expect to find employment in areas of basic biological science and pub- 
lic health as well as agriculture. The demand for men and women with 
advanced training is far greater than the supply. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

PO 401. Poultry Diseases 0-4 

Prerequisites: Required of Majors in Poultry Science. Elective for Others 

with Permission of the Instructor 

The prevention, control, and treatment of the diseases of poultry. 

PO 402. Commercial Poultry Enterprises 0-4 

Prerequisites: Required of Majors in Poultry Science. Elective for Others 
with Permission of the Instructor 

Principles of incubation, hatchery management, development and organiza- 
tion of plans for the building, operation, and maintenance of a commercial 
poultry plant. (Problem.) 

PO 403. Poultry Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Required of Majors in Poultry Science, Senior Year 

Topics and problems relating to Poultry Science and Poultry Industry 

assigned for report and discussion. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

PO 520. Poultry Breeding 3-0 

Prerequisites: GN 411, Required of Majors in Poultry Science; Elective for 
Others with Permission of the Instructor 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 179 

Application of genetic principles to chickens and turkeys, considering phy- 
sical traits and physiological characteristics— feather patterns, egg produc- 
tion, hatchability, growth, body conformation, and utility. (Laboratory 
problems.) Mr. Martin. 

PO 521. Poultry Nutrition 3-0 

Prerequisites: CH 203, CH 451. Required of Majors in Poultry Science; 
Elective for Others 

Protein, vitamin, and mineral requirements for growth, egg production, and 
reproduction in the chicken and turkey. Methods of feeding and compound- 
ing poultry mashes. Laboratory exercises in the production of vitamin and 
mineral deficiencies. Mr. Kelly. 

PO 524. (ZO 524) Comparative Endocrinology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 or Equivalent 

Study of the endocrine system with respect to its physiological importance 

to metabolism, growth, and reproduction. Mr. Garren. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

PO 602. Advanced Poultry Nutrition 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: PO 521, CH 551 or Equivalent 

Research problem in poultry nutrition involving the design and carrying out 
of microbiological and chick experiments. Results from microbiological and 
chick assays are correlated. Mr. Hill. 

PO 698. Special Problems in Poultry Science Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Specific problems using advanced technology for theory exploration. 

Graduate Staff. 

PO 699. Poultry Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Poultry Science 

Critical study of some particular problem involving original investigation. 

(A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree.) 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 
(See School of Education) 

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SOCIOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Selz Cabot Mayo, Head, Edgar John Boone, Charles Horace 

Hamilton 
Associate Professors: Culpepper Paul Marsh, *Glenn C. McCann, James 

Neal Young 

The Department of Rural Sociology offers the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Graduate students studying for the Doctor of Philosophy degree usually 
take approximately one semester of course work in the Department of 



On leave until July 1965. 



180 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Students seek- 
ing the Master of Science degree may take courses at Chapel Hill. However, 
they will be able to complete their entire program at North Carolina State. 

The physical and educational resources of the Rural Sociology Department, 
available to graduate students, include a departmental library of bulletins, 
monographs, and other materials consisting of several thousand items, ac- 
cumulated over a period of thirty years, and catalogued in indexed files. 
Laboratory equipment consists of calculating machines, drawing table and 
instruments, chart making materials, cameras, typewriters, and statistical 
aids. Also at the disposal of the graduate students are automobiles used for 
making field surveys and IBM tabulating equipment operated by the Com- 
puting Center. 

The Department of Rural Sociology prepares graduate students for a 
variety of positions. Men and women with graduate degrees in rural so- 
ciology have opportunities for careers in college teaching, socological re- 
search, social statistics, social work, administration of social organzations and 
governmental agencies, agricultural journalism, and in branches of the 
government's foreign service relating to agriculture and the developing 
areas of the world. 

Institutions offering employment to graduates are Land-Grant colleges, 
agricultural experiment stations, and extension services; other colleges and 
universities; the United States Departments of Agriculture, State, and Health, 
Education and Welfare; state departments of health, education and welfare; 
farm journals and newspapers, and voluntary social agencies such as Red 
Cross, Community Chest, Boy Scouts, and National Tuberculosis Association. 
Each year outstanding graduate students are awarded research or teaching 
assistantships, usually requiring the devotion of half of their time to a re- 
search project or teaching function as appropriate. Cooperative research 
work in the department frequently provides opportunities for part-time 
employment for other graduate students. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

RS 511. Rural Population Problems 3-0 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

A study of population growth, rates of change, and distribution. Consider- 
able attention is given to the functional roles of population, i.e., age, sex, 
race, residence, occupation, marital status, and education. The dynamic 
aspects of population are stressed: fertility, mortality, and migration. Popu- 
lation policy is analyzed in relation to national and international goals. A 
world view is stressed throughout. Mr. Mayo. 

RS 512. Rural Family Living 0-3 

Prerequisite: RS 301 

Values, patterns, and levels of rural family living. Differentials and factors 
related thereto in the world, the nation, and North Carolina. Analysis of 
selected problems, programs, policies, and methods of study. 

Mr. Hamilton. 
RS 513. Community Organization 3-0 

Prerequisite: RS 301 
Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desirable 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 181 

changes in community life. Community needs and resources available to 
meet these needs are studied. Democratic processes in community action 
and principles of community organization are stressed, along with techniques 
and procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and professional, in com- 
munity development are analyzed. Mr. Mayo. 

U.N.C. Philo. 107. Foundations of the Social Sciences 0-3 

Prerequisites: Two Courses in Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology 
An inquiry into the nature of social reality through an examination of the 
basic concepts of sociology, history, etc. Behavioral and subjective ap- 
proaches are contrasted. Both methodological and more broadly philosophical 
problems are discussed. Mr. Natanson. 

U.N.C. Anthro. 121. Culture and Personality 0-3 

A scientific analysis of the influence of cultural forms on the individual in 
our own and other societies, considered from the anthropological, psycholog- 
ical, and clinical points of view. (Offered in the spring of 1965-66 and in 
alternate years.) Mr. Honigmann. 

U.N.C. Soc. 122. Cultural Anthropology 3-0 

A systematic survey of the customs and modes of life of mankind based on 
scientific explanation of the ways of culture. Fee: $1.00. Fall. 

Mr. Johnson. 

U.N.C. Soc. 125. The Negro 0-3 

A study of the Negro community and its institutions, status of the Negro 
in American society, problems of race relations, and the process of integra- 
tion. Spring. Mr. Johnson. 

U.N.C. Soc. 128. Folk Cultures in the Modern World 0-3 

The folk culture is viewed as a way of life which stands midway between 
that of the "primitive" tribal native and of the urbanized city dweller. 
Fee: $1.00. (Offered in 1965-66 and alternate years.) Mr. Erasmus. 

RS 523. Sociological Analysis of Agricultural Land Tenure Systems 3-0 

Prerequisite: Three Hours of Sociology 

A systematic sociological analysis of the major agricultural land tenure sys- 
tems of the world with major emphasis on the problems of family farm 
ownership and tenancy in the United States. Mr. Johnson. 

RS 534. (HI 534) The Farmers' Movement 0-3 

Prerequisite: Three Hours of Sociology 

A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States 
and Canada principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' 
Alliance, the Populist revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the 
Equity societies, the Nonpartisan League, cooperative marketing, govern- 
ment programs, and present problems. Mr. Noblin. 

U.N.C. Soc. 152. History of Social Thought 3-0 

Prerequisite: One Course in One of the Social Sciences or Philosophy 
Emphasis on historic social ideas of Western culture considered against a 
background of general cultural analysis in terms of systematic theory. 

Mr. Vance. 

U.N.C. Soc. 153. Social Structure 3-0 

Analysis of social structure and stratification in terms of class, status, pres- 
tige, rank, and function. Attention is given to the social role of the elite, 
bureaucracies, and professional and middle classes. Mr. Vance. 



182 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

U.N.C. Soc. 161. Sociology of the Fomily 0-3 

Analysis of the family institution as a background for the study of family 
interaction: socialization and the parent-child relationship, courtship and 
marriage interaction, family crises and problems. Mr. Bowerman. 

RS 541. Social Systems and Planned Change 3-0 

Prerequisite: Three Hours of Sociology 

Study of social agencies and programs and their implementation through 
specific organizations in dynamic relation with the people whom they serve. 
Consideration is given to the relation of these agencies and programs to 
community structure and forces in rural society; coordination of the several 
types of agencies and programs; professional leadership in the local com- 
munity; and, problems of stimulating local leadership and participation. 

Mr. Mayo. 
U.N.C. Soc. 168. The City 0-3 

The city as a social phenomenon in the modern world. Analysis of urban 
trends, characteristics, and functions; urban social organization. Sociological 
elements in housing, urban planning, and metropolitan dominance. Growth 
patterns in new centers of urbanization. Mr. Campbell. 

U.N.C. Religion 170. Sociology of Religion 0-3 

Analysis of tensions between the scientific, ethical, and theological study of 
society; the role of religion in social change; the social origins of the 
denominations; the sociological significance of the Reformation; "sect" and 
"church" in sociological theory. Mr. Nash. 

U.N.C. Soc 181. Regional Sociology of the South 0-3 

A sociological analysis of the southern region of the United States. Em- 
phasis on fact, factors, and policies pertaining to geography, population 
and culture; resources and waste; social institutions and planning. 



Mr. Simpson. 



Courses for Graduates Only 



U.N.C. Soc. 210. Folk Sociology 3-0 

Folk sociology as a subject field for the historical study of total human 
society and the empirical study of group behavior. Mr. Simpson. 

RS 611. Research Methods in Sociology 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific 
research in sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, 
the interrelationship of theory and research, the use of selected techniques 
and their relation to research designs, and the use of modern tabulation 
equipment in research. Mr. McCann. 

U.N.C. Soc. 212. American Sociologists 0-3 

A general treatise on the rise and development of American sociology and 

a survey of the work and personalities of American sociologists projected on 

the background of social theory and research. Mr. Simpson. 

U.N.C. Soc. 218. Human Ecology (Seminar) 0-3 

Consideration of theory and research emerging around the concept of human 
ecology. A review of the background of human ecology is followed by read- 
ings, reports, and research on its contemporary development. (Offered in 
1964-65 and alternate years.) Mr. Vance. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 183 

U.N.C. Anthro. 220. Theories of Culture 0-3 

A systematic survey of the history in cultural anthropology leading to the 
development of a system of operational principles which the student may 
apply in his own fieldwork and further studies involving cultural problems. 
(Offered in 1965-66 and alternate years.) Mr. Honigmann. 

RS 621. Rural Social Psychology 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Treats the genetic development of the rural personality and the interrela- 
tionship of the individual and the rural society. Studies of social psy- 
chological factors related to rural leadership, morale, social organization, 
and social change, and examines the attitudes and opinions of rural people 
on current local and national issues. Mr. McCann. 

U.N.C. Anthro. 221. Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology 0-3 

Practical exercises and discussion cover topics of role taking, observation, 
interviewing, note taking, and pattern generalization. Mr. Honigmann. 

U.N.C. Anthro. 230. Race and Culture Contacts 0-3 

An analysis of acculturation situations arising from contracts of peoples of 
different racial or cultural heritages in America, Africa, Polynesia, Melanesia, 
and other areas. Mr. Johnson. 

RS 631. Population Analysis 0-3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Methods of describing, analyzing, and presenting data on human popula- 
tions: distribution, characteristics, natural increase, migration, and trends 
in relation to resources. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 632. Rural Family 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Emphasis is placed on the development of an adequate sociological frame 
of reference for family analysis; on discovering both the uniquely-cultural 
and common-human aspects of the family by means of cross-cultural com- 
parisons; on historical explanations for variability in American families 
with special concern for the rural family; and on analyzing patterns of 
family stability and effectiveness. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 633. The Rural Community 0-3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

The rural community is viewed in sociological perspective as a functioning 
entity. A method of analysis is presented and applied to eight "dimensions", 
with emphasis on the unique types of understanding to be derived from 
measuring each dimension. Finally, the effect of change on community inte- 
gration and development is analyzed. Mr. Mayo. 

U.N.C. Soc. 262. European Sociological Theory 3-0 

Theory in sociological research. Major methodological and theoretical 
orientations. Development from European backgrounds of current theories 
of differentiation, integration, change, social systems and structural-func- 
tional analysis. Mr. Simpson. 

U.N.C. Soc. 333. Seminar in Marriage and the Family 3-0 

Mr. Bowerman. 

U.N.C. Soc. 334. Critique of Research in Marriage and the Family 3-0 

This seminar reviews the basic conceptual frameworks used in family re- 



184 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

search in the past; identifies changing emphasis in family study; and 
evaluates current studies in the major fields of family research. (Offered 
in 1964-65 and alternate years.) Mr. Bowerman. 

U.N.C. Psych. 233. Methods of Investigation in Social Psychology 0-3 

Methods of investigation in psychology with application to the social 
sciences. Survey methodology with particular emphasis on techniques, con- 
tributions, and limitations of public opinion polling. Mr. Thibaut. 

RS 641. (ST 641) Statistics in Sociology 3-0 

Prerequisite: Statistics 513 

The application of statistical methods of sociological research. Emphasis 
on selecting appropriate models, instruments, and techniques, for the more 
frequently encountered problems and forms of data. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 652. Comparative Rural Societies 3-0 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Sociological analysis of rural societies around the world with particular 
reference to North and South America. Special emphasis is given to cultural 
and physical setting, population composition, levels of living, relationship 
of the people to the land, structure and function of the major institutions, 
and forces making for change. Mr. Mayo. 

RS 653. Theory and Development of Rural Sociology 0-3 

Prerequisite: Six Hours of Sociology 

Required of all masters and doctoral candidates in rural sociology and is 
recommended for all graduate minors. Designed to meet two objectives: (1) 
to introduce the student to the study of current sociological theory, and 
(2) to survey events and trends in the historical development of rural 
sociology. Mr. Hamilton. 

RS 690. Seminar Credits by Arrangement 

Appraisal of current literature; presentation of research papers by students; 
progress reports on departmental research; review of developing research 
methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings and conferences; other 
professional matters. (A maximum of two credits is allowed toward the 
Master's degree, and four credits toward the Doctorate.) 

RS 699. Research in Rural Sociology Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Permission of Chairman of Graduate Study Committee 
Planning and execution of research, and preparation of manuscript under 
supervision of graduate committee. (Maximum of six credits.) Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Selz Cabot Mayo, Head, Elmer Hubert Johnson, Sanford 

Richard Winston 
Associate Professor: Horace Darr Rawls 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology cooperates with the De- 
partment of Rural Sociology in programs of study leading to graduate de- 
grees. In addition, courses are available to students pursuing a graduate pro- 
gram in other areas of study. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 185 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

SOC 40T. Human Relations in Industrial Society 3 or 3 

Prerequisite: Senior Status or Permission of Instructor 

Selected societies about the world are contrasted with American society to 
demonstrate the correlation between technology and general behavior pat- 
terns, both within industry and in the total social order. The patterns of 
adjustment by the individual to the organizational framework (business 
concern, manufacturing enterprise, etc.) are analyzed in terms of social 
status, social roles, work norms, and attitudes. The social significance of 
major characteristics of contemporary industry is considered in terms of such 
topics as enlargement of the geographic bounds of the human community, 
development of occupational specialization, alteration of the character of 
inter-group interaction, and the growing integration of American culture. 
The interrelationships between industry and social change are discussed 
to show the effect of new social conditions upon industrial operations and 
the effect of technological change upon the family, school, church, and gov- 
ernment. The contribution of industry to social progress is analyzed to pro- 
mote the student's understanding of the dynamic quality of the social 
environment within which he will function. 

SOC 402. Urban Sociology 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and Permission of Instructor 

The course begins with a study of the factors behind the organic growth 
of cities. The relationship between the physical design of cities and their 
social organization is discussed. This is followed by a detailed analysis of 
new developments in the serving of human needs (adequate housing, and 
the design of physical and social structures for religious, educational, public 
welfare, and recreational activities) . Socio-psychological aspects of life in 
an urbanized society are compared with those of predominantly agricultural 
societies. The increasing integration of urban and rural living is emphasized. 
Finally, the changing character of urban life is seen in the resulting demand 
for city and regional planning and the use of administrative personnel hav- 
ing both technical and social backgrounds. 

SOC 411. Community Relationships 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and Permission of Instructor 

A survey of the institutions, organizations, and agencies to be found in 
modern communities; the social conditions or problems, such as recrea- 
tion, health, welfare, etc., with which they deal; their inter-relationship 
and the trend toward over-all planning. 

SOC 412. Introduction to Social Work 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202 and Permission of Instructor 

An introductory course, designed to acquaint students with the various 
types of public and private social work and with remedial and preventive 
programs in applied sociology; social psychiatry, health, public welfare, 
and recreation. 

SOC 414. Social Structure 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Six Hours in Sociology and Permission of Instructor 

Studies of the major social institutions and systems of stratification; the 



186 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

organization of social systems as, for example, religion, education, and gov- 
ernment; the functions of such structural components as age and sex groups, 
vocational and professional groups, and social classes. 

SOC 416. Research Methods 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Nine Hours in Sociology and Permission of Instructor 

An analysis of the principle methods of social research; the development of 

experiments; schedules and questionnaires; the measurement of behavior. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SOC 501. Leadership 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or Equivalent 

A study of leadership in various fields of American life: analysis of the var- 
ious factors associated with leadership; techniques of leadership. Particular 
attention is given to recreational, scientific, and executive leadership pro- 
cedures. Mr. Winston. 

SOC 502. Society, Culture, and Personality 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or Equivalent 

Human personality is studied from its origins in primary groups through 
its development in secondary contacts and its ultimate integration with 
social norms. While comparative anthropological materials will be drawn 
upon, emphasis is placed upon the normal personality and the adjustment 
of the individual to our society and to our culture. The dynamics of per- 
sonality and character structure are analyzed in terms of the general cul- 
ture patterns and social institutions of society. Mr. Rawls. 

SOC 505. The Sociology of Rehabilitation 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or Equivalent 

The course stresses the social and cultural implications of the rehabilitation 
approach. Emphasis is placed upon the social and personal problems of 
physically and mentally handicapped persons. The interrelationships of the 
major social environments are considered at length in this regard. Objectives 
of the rehabilitation processes are analyzed in terms of the sociology of 
work. A major portion of the course is devoted to rehabilitation as a pro- 
fession, particular attention being given to the diverse roles of specialists in 
this field. Mr. Rawls. 

SOC 511. Sociological Theory 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: Six Semester Hours in Sociology and Graduate Standing or 
Permission of the Instructor 

Study of the interdependence of theory and method; the major theoretical 
and methodological systems; and examination of selected cases of research in 
which theory and method are classically combined. Mr. Rawls. 

SOC 510. Industrial Sociology 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or Equivalent 

Industrial relations are analyzed as group behavior with a complex and 
dynamic network of rights, obligations, sentiments, and rules. This social 
system is viewed as an interdependent part of total community life. The 
background and functioning of industrialism are studied as social and cul- 
tural phenomena. Specific social problems of industry are analyzed. 

Mr. Johnson. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 187 

SOC 590. Applied Research 3 or 3 

Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or Equivalent 

Individual research problems in applied fields of sociology, such as problems 
of the family, population, and social work; rural-urban relations; student 
success; American leadership. Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Ralph J. McCracken, Head, William Victor Bartholomew, 
James Walter Fitts, Eugene J. Kamprath, James Fulton Lutz, Charles 
B. McCants, William Garland Woltz, William Walton Woodhouse, Jr. 

Associate Professors: Charles Bingham Davey, William A. Jackson, Preston 
Harding Reid, James Maurice Spain, Richard J. Volk, Sterling B. Weed 

Assistant Professors: Maurice Gayle Cook, George A. Cummings, Robert 
E. McCollum, Raymond Jarvis Miller 

The Department of Soil Science offers training leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with major emphases in the 
fields of soil chemistry, soil fertility, soil physics, soil genesis, and soil micro- 
biology. 

Facilities are provided for soils graduate teaching and research in Wil- 
liams Hall, a large modern building. Office and laboratory space is assigned 
to each student. A library equipped with books, periodicals and biographic 
material relative to soils and related subjects is maintained for departmental 
use. Facilities for graduate study include radioactive and stable isotope lab- 
oratories containing automatic recording scalers, a mass spectrometer, amino 
acid analyzer, complete equipment for soil mineralogical studies including 
x-ray diffraction apparatus with fluorescence, differential thermal analysis, 
infrared spectrophotometer, polarizing microscope, high speed centrifuges, 
thin sectioning apparatus, and other modern equipment. Photomicrographic 
equipment is available for photographing thin sections and microorganisms. 

Service laboratories for routine soil and plant analyses are available as 
well as special preparation rooms for soil and plant samples. Greenhouses 
and growth chambers situated at the back of Williams Hall are accessible for 
controlled plant studies. Outdoor experiments in concrete frames, large 
tile, or small plots are conducted in an area near Williams Hall. Field ex- 
periments are made on the sixteen research farms owned or operated by the 
State. These farms are located throughout North Carolina to include a wide 
variety of soil and climatic conditions needed for experiments in soils. One 
of the largest and best equipped soil testing laboratories in the United 
States is operated by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture in Ra- 
leigh. Special studies on the various problems of soil testing can be made in 
conjunction with this laboratory. 

Strong supporting departments greatly increase the graduate student's op- 
portunities for a broad and thorough training. Included among those de- 



188 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

partments in which graduate students in soil science work cooperatively or 
obtain instruction are crop science, botany, chemistry, geology, mathematics, 
plant pathology, physics, and statistics. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

SSC 511. Soil Physics 4-0 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, PY 212 

Physical constitution and analyses; soil structure, soil water, soil air and 

soil temperature in relation to plant growth. Mr. Lutz. 

SSC 522. Soil Chemistry 0-4 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 553 and CH 433 or Permission of Instructor 
A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay and soil 
systems, including ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, 
solvation of clays, and eletrokinetic properties of clay-water systems. 

Mr. Weed. 

SSC 524. Mass Spectrometry 0-2 

Prerequisites: SSC 302 and CH 433 or Permission of Instructor 
An examination of theoretical and analytical aspects of mass spectrometry 
and stable isotopic techniques; application of diese methods to biochemical 
research. (Offered 1964-65 and in alternate years.) Mr. Volk. 

SSC 532. (BO 531) Soil Microbiology 0-3 

Prerequisites: SSC 302, BO 312, CH 220 

The more important microbiological processes that occur in soils; decom- 
position or organic materials, ammonification, nitrification, and nitrogen 
fixation. Mr. Bartholomew. 

SSC 541. Soil Fertility 3-0 

Prerequisites: SSC 302, SSC 341 

Soil conditions affecting plant growth and the chemistry of soil and fertilizer 
interrelationships. Factors affecting the availability of nutrients. Methods 
of measuring nutrient availability. Mr. Kamprath. 

SSC 551. Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification 3-0 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 302 or SSC 341 and MIG 120 
Morphology: Study of concepts of soil horizons and soil profiles and chemi- 
cal, physical and mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing them. 
Genesis: Critical study of soil forming factors and processes. Classification: 
Critical evaluation of historical development and present concepts of soil 
taxonomy with particular reference to great soil groups as well as discussion 
of logical basis of soil classification. Mr. McCracken. 

SSC 553. Soil Mineralogy 3-0 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 341 and MIG 330 or Permission of Instructor 
Composition, structure, classification, identification, origin, occurrence, and 
significance of soil minerals with emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, 
layer silicate clays, and sesquioxides. Messrs. McCracken, Weed. 

SSC 560. North Carolina Soils and Their Management Summer School 3 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 302 or SSC 341 

Field studies of selected soil series in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont and 

Mountain areas of North Carolina. Discussion of management practices 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 189 

that should be associated with the various soils under different types of 
farming. (Offered 1965 summer and in alternate years.) 

Messrs. Fitts, McCracken, Spain. 

SSC 590. Special Problems Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 302 

Special problems in various phases of soils. Problems may be selected or 
will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current 
research. Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

SSC 622. Physical and Chemical Properties of Soils 0-4 

Prerequisites: SSC 511, SSC 522, CH 433, MA 301 or Permission of Instructor 
An examination in depth of current ideas concerning the physics and chem- 
istry of soil and clay systems. Topics will include ion exchange, molecular 
adsorption, electrokinetics, relations between mineral structures and their 
physical and chemical properties, and the properties of adsorbed water. 
Emphasis will be determined by student interest and by current literature. 
(Offered 1964-65 and in alternate years.) Messrs. Miller, Weed. 

SSC 651. Pedology 3-0 

Prerequisites: SSC 522, SSC 511 

A critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis and morph- 
ology; detailed study of soil taxonomy. Topics include weathering and clay 
mineral genesis as related to soil morphology and genesis, functional analyses 
of soil genesis, properties of and processes responsible for soil profiles formed 
under various sets of soil forming factors, classification theory and logic as 
applied to soil classification, structure of soil classification schemes. Any of 
those topics may be emphasized at the expense of the others according to 
interests of students. (Offered 1965-66 and in alternate years.) 

Mr. McCracken. 

SSC 672. Soil Properties and Plant Development 0-4 

Prerequisites: CH 551, SSC 522 or Equivalent 

A detailed examination of the effects of soil factors in the development of 
crop plants. Segments of the course will treat (1) soil transformation proces- 
ses of both organic and inorganic constituents, (2) concepts of nutrient 
availability and (3) the relation of plant development indices to specific 
soil properties. (Offered 1965-66 and in alternate years.) 

Messrs. Bartholomew, Davey, Jackson. 

SSC 690. Seminar 1-1 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Soil Science 

Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of 
interest to agronomists reviewed and discussed. (A maximum of two credits 
is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any number toward the Doctorate.) 

Graduate Staff. 

SSC 699. Research Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing in Soil Science 

A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master's degree, but any 

number toward the Doctorate. Graduate Staff. 



190 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SCHOOL OF TEXTILES 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Malcolm Eugene Campbell, Dean, Clarence Monroe Asbill, 
Jr., John Francis Bogdan, Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, David Marshall 
Cates, Elliot Brown Grover, Dame Scott Hamby, Harley Young Jen- 
nings, Joseph Alexander Porter, Jr., Henry Ames Rutherford, William 
Edward Shinn 

Associate Professors: Arthur A. Armstrong, Jr., Arthur Courtney Hayes, 
William Clifton Stuckey, Jr. 

Assistant Professor: Ernest Bezold Berry 

Post Doctoral Research Instructors: Ilham A. Birkan, Joachim Gayler 

The School of Textiles offers programs leading to the Master of Science 
in Textile Technology, Master of Textile Technology, and Master of Sci- 
ence in Textile Chemistry. 

The fundamental objectives of the graduate program in the School of 
Textiles are to develop in students their abilities to initiate and conduct 
independent investigations which lead to the development of new knowledge, 
and to stimulate the thought processes associated with learning and decision 
making. These objectives are accomplished through programs designed to 
increase the general knowledge of the student and to develop a more com- 
prehensive understanding of the major field through study and research. 

The program of study for the graduate student in Textile Technology 
may be arranged to develop a broad background in advanced technology 
and, at the same time, emphasize areas such as fiber and yarn technology, 
fabric technology, knitting technology, or quality control. In addition to the 
major field of Textile Technology, students may minor in fields such as 
experimental statistics, economics, mathematics, physics, engineering, psy- 
chology, and political science. 

The programs of study for the Master of Science degree include a minimum 
of 30 semester credit hours of advanced courses, a thesis based on research 
conducted by the student, and proficiency in one foreign language. The plan 
of course work and the research activities for the Master of Science degree 
are designed to prepare the student for a career in research, quality control, 
and other technical phases of the textile industry, as well as a continuation of 
his educational program to more advanced degrees. The minimum re- 
quirement for a Master of Textile Technology is the satisfactory completion 
of 36 semester credit hours of advanced courses. There is no thesis or 
foreign language requirement for the Master of Textile Technology. The 
basic purpose of this program is to offer to the student the more advanced 
technology without the emphasis on research. Students studying for this 
degree are encouraged to minor in economics with emphasis in the area 
of management. 

In the Department of Textile Technology the current activities in re- 
search include such problems as fundamental studies of man-made fiber 
properties, characterization of combed and carded yarns, influence of varia- 
tion in linear density of in-process materials as related to finished product 
quality, and processing problems as associated with the newest develop- 
ments in materials and supplementary equipment. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 191 

In the Department of Textile Chemistry research emphasis is placed on 
absorption studies, textile chemical processes, new materials and new 
methods, and modification of fibrous polymers. The objective of the grad- 
uate program is to stimulate basic research and to train scientists at the 
graduate level in the general field of fiber chemistry. Strong supporting pro- 
grams are maintained in chemistry, chemical engineering, mathematics, 
experimental statistics, and physics. 

The physical resources of the School of Textiles are at the disposal of all 
graduate students. Separate research laboratories for both physical and 
chemical investigations are available for graduate research. The research 
and educational programs of the school have facilitated the development of 
a competent staff of instructors and researchers. A shop is available in 
Nelson Textile Building for construction and maintenance of apparatus. 

A number of teaching assistantships and research fellowships are available. 
The stipend ranges from $1,800 to $2,700 with some fellowships also includ- 
ing tuition and fees. 

The demand by industry and educational institutions for graduates with 
advanced degees has constantly exceeded the supply. The financial remun- 
eration is not only larger, but professional development and recognition 
are generally more readily attained. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

Textile Technology 

TX 430. Continuous Filament Yarns 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of students in Fiber and Yarn Technology and Knitting Tech- 
nology; Elective for Others 

A study of properties and processes applicable only to filament yarns such 
as texturizing and bulking. Detailed studies of throwing systems, engineer- 
ing requirements of equipment, and yarn property changes resulting from 
processing. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week.) 

TX 436. Staple Fiber Processing 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 303 

Required of Students in Fiber and Yarn Technology; Elective for Others 
A study of special systems of processing long, staple, natural and man-made 
fibers, including woolen, worsted, direct spinning, Turbo Stapler, or Pacific 
Converter, and sliver to yarn methods. New concepts and research findings 
as applied to all yarn processes. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour labora- 
tory period per week.) 

Textile Chemistry 

TC 403, TC 404. Textile Chemical Technology 3-3 

Prerequisites: TC 304, CH 223 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

Basic principles are applied to the study of three important areas of textile 

processing; dyeing, printing, and finishing. These areas are concerned with 



192 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

the chemical nature of dyes and other chemical agents applied to fibrous 
systems; with the chemical and physical properties of the various fibers; and 
with the mechanical aspects of the application of chemical materials to fibers 
and fabrics. The course includes an extensive review of the various classes 
of dyes and their application to all important textile fibers and blends of 
fibers; a comparative analysis of dyeing machinery and processes involving 
special machinery and equipment; a survey of modern preparatory and 
bleaching for all important fibers; a study of the roller printing machine, 
and the principles involved in print formulations for the major classes of 
dyes and their application to the various fibers; a study of important 
mechanical, additive, and chemical modification type finishes for fabric. 
Three 1-hour lectures per week. Mr. Campbell. 

TC 405, TC 406. Textile Chemical Technology Laboratory 2-2 

Required of seniors in Textile Chemistry 

To be taken concurrently with TV 403 or 404. Two 3-hour laboratories per 

week. 

TC 412. Textile Chemical Analysis II 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 215 

Required of Students in Textile Chemistry 

Analysis of textile materials involving specialized instruments, and tech- 
niques such as spectrophotometry, pH measurements, electrometric titration, 
viscometry, etc. (One 1-hour lecture and two 3-hour laboratories per week.) 

TC 421. Fabric Finishing I 0-2 

Prerequisite: TC 201 

Students in Textile Chemistry may not take this course for degree credit. 
A general course in fabric finishing designed for students not majoring in 
Textile Chemistry. Emphasis placed on finishes used on garment-type 
fabrics, including stabilization finishes, water repellency, crease resistance, 
moth and mildew proofing, fire-proofing, etc. Emphasis on chemistry of 
finishes varied to fit requirements of students. (Two 1-hour lectures per 
week.) 

General Textile Courses 

TX 483. Textile Cost Methods 3-3 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365 

Required of Seniors in Textiles except those in Management Option 

A survey of cost methods applicable to textile operations with emphasis on 

decision making as related to costing and cost control. (Three 1-hour lectures 

per week.) 

Knitting Technology 

TX 441. Flat Knitting 3-0 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of Seniors in Knitting Technology; Elective for Others 

A study of the leading types of flat knitting machines including warp 

knitting machines, design possibilities and fabric adaptability. (Two 1-hour 

lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 193 

TX 442. Knitted Fabrics 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of Seniors in Textile Technology and Knitting Technology 
Design, analysis, and production of knitted fabrics, including flat, circular, 
and warp types. The economic aspects of the knitting process as a method of 
clothing production. Introduction to garment design, production and market- 
ing. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week.) 

TX 444. Garment Manufacture 0-3 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of Seniors in Knitting Technology; Elective for Others 
A study of circular latch needle and spring needle machines for knitted 
fabric production. Styling, cutting and seaming of the basic garment types 
for underwear and outerwear, standard seam types; high-speed sewing ma- 
chines. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week.) 

TX 447, TX 448. Advanced Knitting Laboratory 2-2 

Prerequisite: TX 342 

Required of Seniors in Knitting Technology; Elective for Others 
Systematic study of circular hosiery mechanisms; hosiery types and construc- 
tions. Seamless hosiery production methods utilizing the newer synthetic 
yarns, toe closing methods, finishing processes, and marketing are em- 
phasized. 

TX 449. Tricot Knitting 0-3 

Prerequisite: TX 342 
Elective for Juniors and Seniors 

A study of basic types of tricot knitting machines with emphasis on mecha- 
nisms and fabrics. Attention is given to warp preparation methods appli- 
cable to the tricot machine, the characteristics of yarn made from natural 
and synthetic fibers as they affect processing into warp knitted fabrics, ma- 
chine settings for proper qualities and ratios; economics of warp knitting, 
and end uses. Attention is given to fabric design and analysis. (Two 1-hour 
lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period per week.) 

TX 478. Design and Weaving 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 366 

Required of Students in Fabric Technology; Elective for Others 
Advanced study of special weave formations and the techniques and equip- 
ment necessary to form these fabrics. Studies in depth of new developments 
and research findings in the areas of warp preparation, design, weaving and 
fabric formation. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory period 
per week.) 

TX 485. Mill Design and Organization 3-3 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 365 

Required of Students in Textile Technology Curriculum; for Seniors in 
Final Semester Only 

Application of economic principles to textile factoring, hedging, and other 
buying and selling problems. Inventory control, organization, and depart- 
mental functions of textile companies. Technical problems of plant site 






194 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

selection, plant design and layout, and selection of equipment. Layout of 
a mill by each student. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
period per week.) 

TX 490. Development Project I Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor; Elective 
A problem of independent study assigned to seniors in the major field of 
study serving also as the laboratory period for senior level courses. (Labora- 
tory hours arranged.) 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Textile Technology 

TX 501. Textile Technology Seminar 2-2 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Permission of Instructor; Elective 
Lecture and discussion periods are designed for students who are particu- 
larly interested in the yarn manufacturing aspects of the textile industry. 
Subject matter will include such various aspects as training methods, safety 
programs, modern mill design, specialized techniques in setting rates, em- 
ployee relations, and developments that arise from technical meetings. 
(Two 1-hour lectures per week.) Mr. Grover, Gradute Staff. 

TX 521. Textile Testing II 3-0 

Prerequisite: TX 327 

Elective 

Advanced techniques for measuring properties of natural and man-made 

fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Interrelations of raw material quality, -processing 

characteristics, and end product properties. The application of the laws of 

physical sciences to evaluation of textile materials. (Two 1-hour lectures 

and one 3-hour laboratory per week.) Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey. 

TX 522. Textile Quality Control 0-3 

Prerequisite: TX 521 
Elective 

Quality control systems for textile operations. Defect prevention methods, 
isolation of processes contributing to substandard quality, relationship 
between quality control department and operating division. Laboratory 
design, equipment and personnel selection, installation of quality control 
systems. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week.) 

Messrs. Hamby, Stuckey. 

TX 525. Advanced Textile Microscopy 2-2 

Prerequisite: TX 327 
Elective 

Experiments, lectures and demonstrations in more advanced techniques 
of textile microscopy. Detailed studies of structures of fibers covered in 
lecture series, supplemented by experiments on lecture topics. Detailed 
study of all types of microscopes and their uses in textiles. Preparation of 
slides for photography. Uses of photomicrographic equipment. Lectures 
and laboratories arranged. Mr. Stuckey. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 195 

TX 551. Complex Woven Structures 4-4 

Prerequisites: TX 303, TX 478 
Elective 

The development of design specifications for complex fabrics as related 
to fabric geometry, functional and aesthetic properties and manufacturing 
limitations. (Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week.) 

Mr. Berry. 

TX 575. Fabric Analytics and Characteristics 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 365 or TX 366 or TC 511 

Analysis and study of textile fabrics to determine the composite effects of 
yarn and fiber properties. Fabric design features that are related to me- 
chanical as well as aesthetic properties. Engineering and fabrics based on 
utilization of other mixtures and homogeneous blends of natural and 
man-made fibers. (Three 1-hour lectures per week.) 

Messrs. Berry, Porter. 

TX 590. Special Projects in Textiles 1 to 3 

Prerequisites: TX 327, Senior Standing, Permission of Instructors, Elective 
Special studies in either the major or minor field of the advanced under- 
graduate or graduate student. These special studies will take the form of 
current problems of the industry, independent investigations in the areas of 
textile testing and quality control, seminars and technical presentations, 
both oral and written. Staff. 

Textile Chemistry 

TC 501. Seminar in Textile Chemistry 0-2 

Prerequisite: TC 403 

Required of Seniors in Textile Chemistry 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal sources 
of textile chemical literature and to emphasize the importance of keeping 
abreast of developments in the field of textile chemistry. Particular atten- 
tion is paid to the fundamentals of technical writing. (Reports. Lectures 
arranged.) Mr. Campbell, Staff. 

TC 512. (CH 512) Chemistry of High Polymers 0-3 

Prerequisite: CH 431 

Elective 

Principles of condensation and free radical polymerization; kinetics and 

molecular wright description; copolymerization and composition; emulsion 

polymerization; structure. (Three 1-hour lectures per week.) Mr. Cates. 

TC 521. Textile Chemical Analysis III 3-3 

Prerequisite: TC 421 or Permission of Instructor 

Elective for Students in Textile Technology; No Credit Allowed for Stu- 
dents Majoring in Textile Chemistry 

The work includes a survey of organic chemistry, with emphasis on organic 
surfactants, warp sizes, and fabric finishes of all types; the identification of 
fibers by chemical means; the qualitative and quantitative analysis of fiber 
blends by chemical means, the identification of finishes; the evaluation tech- 
niques for dyed and finished materials. (Two 1-hour lectures and one 3- 
hour laboratory period per week.) Staff. 



196 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

TC 561. (CH 561) Chemistry of Fibers 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 223 
Required of Seniors in Textile Chemistry 

A lecture course emphasizing the theory of fiber structure; the relationship 
between the chemical structure and physical properties of natural and man- 
made fibers; the nature of the chemical reactions which produce degrada- 
tion of fibers; the production of man-made fibers. (Three 1-hour lectures 
per week.) Mr. Rutherford. 

General Textiles 

TX 581. Instrumentation and Control 3-3 

Prerequisite: PY 212 

Required of All Seniors in Textiles and Textile Chemistry 

A lecture series with coordinated laboratory exercises designed to familiarize 

the student with the theory and application of instruments and control 

apparatus that he will find in the modern textile plant. The studies cover 

the measurement and control of temperature, humidity, pressure, flow and 

liquid level, the application of control apparatus to chemical processes and 

physical finishing of textile products. (Two 1-hour and one 2-hour laboratory 

period per week.) Mr. Asbill. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

TX 601, TX 602. Yarn Technology 3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Studies of advanced techniques in textile production; the technological as- 
pects of fiber properties in relation to processing; studies of research findings 
and application of these to processing equipment. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby. 
TC 605. Physical Chemistry of Dyeing 3-3 

Prerequisite: CH 433 

Development of principles of thermodynamics, emphasizing applications in 
dye and fiber chemistry. Mr. Cates. 

TC 606. Chemistry of Fiber-Forming High Polymers 3-0 

Prerequisite: CH 431 

Structure and properties of fibers; thermodynamics of sorption and solution; 
solution properties; molecular weight determination; flow properties; me- 
chanical properties. (Three 1-hour lectures per week.) 

Mr. Cates. 

TX 621. Textile Testing III 2-2 

Prerequisite: TX 522 or Equivalent 

Design of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instru- 
ments required for specific needs: performance of tests and analysis of data 
on industrial problems; specialized physical tests; inter-laboratory tests and 
analysis; study of A.S.T.M. specifications and work on task groups for the 
A.S.T.M. Society. Mr. Hamby. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 197 

TX 631. Synthetic Fibers 0-2 

Prerequisite: TX 430 or TX 436 or Equivalent 

Lectures and projects on advanced problems relative to the properties and 

processing of man-made continuous filament and staple fiber yarns. 

Messrs. Grover, Hamby. 

TX 641, TX 642. Advanced Knitting Systems and Mechanisms 3-3 

Prerequisite: TX 441 or Equivalent 

A critical study of inventions which have contributed to the development of 
the modern knitting industry; knitting needles and their adaption for 
specific uses; means for mounting them for individual and en masse opera- 
tion; construction and functioning of cooperating elements including sliders, 
jacks, sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, narrowing and tensioning and 
draw-off motions, regulating mechanisms, timing and control chains and 
cams. Use will be made of patent literature which covers important develop- 
ments in the hosiery industry. (Three 1-hour lectures per week.) 

Mr. Shinn. 

TX 643, TX 644. Knitting Technology 3-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Eight Credits in Knitting Technology 
Problems of specific interest to the knitting industry will be assigned for 
study and investigation. The use of experimental methods will be empha- 
sized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for publication. 

Graduate Staff. 

TX 651, TX 652. Fabric Development and Construction 3-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing 

Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of 

woven fabrics. Mr. Porter. 

TX 698. Seminar 1-1 

Discussion of scientific articles of interest to textile industry; review and dis- 
cussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff. 

TX 699. Textile Research Credits by Arrangement 

Problems of specific interest to the textile industry will be assigned for study 
and investigation. The use of experimental methods will be emphasized. 
Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for publication. The 
master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. 

Graduate Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Graduate Faculty 

Professors: Bernard Stephen Martof, Head, Frederick Schenck Barkalow, 
Jr., Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Reinard Harkema, Don William Hayne, 
Morley Richard Kare, Ralph Winston Stacy, Thomas Lavelle Quay 

Professor Emeritus: Bartholomew Brandner Brandt 

Adjunct Professor: Theodore R. Rice 

Associate Professors: William Walton Hassler, Francis Eugene Hester, 
Grover Cleveland Miller, John Anthony Santolucito 

Assistant Professors: Charles Walter Alliston, Robert E. Lubow 

The Department of Zoology offers to qualified students the opportunity 
to earn the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Students 



198 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

may specialize in many areas: behavior, general ecology, population dynamics, 
limnology, fisheries biology, wildlife biology, the taxonomy, ecology and life 
histories of parasites, comparative morphology and systematics of vertebrates, 
comparative and developmental physiology, endocrinology, sensory physiol- 
ogy, and the dynamics of respiration and circulation. 

The department is located in Gardner Hall where facilities for a wide 
variety of research activities are available. Several ponds and pools near 
Raleigh are used for graduate studies as are certain parks and recreation 
areas. A research station is available at Hatteras for studies in marine and 
estuarine fisheries; additional field facilities occur in the Roanoke River, 
Albemarle Sound and Chowan River areas. 

By mutual agreement, a student may choose to do his research with any 
member of the graduate staff. A student will make up his plan of study after 
discussing his interests and objectives with his major professor and advisory 
committee. Those courses will be selected which will best prepare him for his 
particular interests. Advanced courses in other departments provide a variety 
of subjects for minor fields of study: botany, entomology, genetics, statistics, 
biochemistry, psychology, and other related sciences. The student is given 
the opportunity to develop a high order of independent thought, broad 
knowledge, technical skills, and thorough training in investigative techniques. 
Strong emphasis is placed on active participation in seminars, practice in the 
methods of original research and preparation of manuscripts for publication 
in scientific journals. 

A variety of positions are open to students holding advanced degrees. 
There is a great need for professional zoologists in teaching and research in 
institutions of higher learning and in industry. Research personnel are 
especially in demand in behavior, physiology and the paramedical sciences. 
Numerous positions in the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Soil Conservation 
Service, the Forest Service, and the Park Service are open to zoologists. 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZO 501. Ornithology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

The biology and classification of birds. Field trips for the study and identifi- 
cation of local forms, including trips to Lake Mattamuskeet in February 
and the coast in May. Individual research projects on nesting populations. 

Mr. Quay. 

ZO 513. Comparative Animal Physiology 3-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 

The comparative physiology of selected systems. Topics will be chosen for 
detailed consideration in lectures, collateral reading, and class discussion. 
Each student will, in addition, prepare a term report. A few topics for study 
may be determined by the interests of the students and by their needs as may 
be expressed by the supervisor of their major work. 

Mr. Santolucito. 

ZO 520. Fishery Science 3-0 

Prerequisites: BS 100 and Approval of Instructor 

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles and methods of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 199 

fishery science. Current theories and practices of fish management will be 
studied. Life history and biology of important game and commercial species. 
Survey of fishery resources. Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 521. Fishery Science 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 520 

An analysis of fishery research methods and objectives. Detailed studies of 
the procedures for estimating fish populations, annual reproduction, mor- 
tality rates, growth rates, and exploitation rates. The relationship between 
natural fluctuations in fisheries and environmental factors. Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 522. Animal Ecology 3_0 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

The general principles of the inter-relations among animals and between 

animals and their environments— land, freshwater, marine. Mr. Quay. 

ZO 524. (PO 524) Comparative Endocrinology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 301 or Equivalent 

Study of the endocrine system with respect to its physiological importance 
to metabolism, growth, and reproduction. Laboratory techniques and dem- 
onstrations. Mr. Garren. 

ZO 532. (See GN 532. Biological Effects of Radiations.) 
ZO 540. (See GN 540. Evolution.) 

ZO 541. Ichthyology 0-3 

Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor 

The classification and ecology of selected groups of fishes. Lectures, labora- 
tories, and field trips dealing with the systematic positions, life histories, 
interrelationships, and distribution of the particular groups of fishes selected 
in accordance with the needs and interests of the class. Mr. Hassler. 

ZO 542. Herpetology 0-3 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

The biology of amphibians and reptiles. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips 
dealing with systematics, life histories, anatomy, behavior, and ecology. 
(Offered 1964-65 and alternate years.) Mr. Martof. 

ZO 544. Mammalogy 3-0 

Prerequisites: BS 100, ZO 201, and Approval of Instructor 

The classification, identification, and ecology of the major mammalian 

groups. Mr. Barkalow. 

ZO 545. Histology 4-0 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

The microscopic anatomy of animal tissues. Staff. 

ZO 550. (See GN 550. Experimental Evolution.) 

ZO 551, ZO 552. Wildlife Science 3-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 201 

The principles of wildlife management and their application are studied 
in the laboratory and in the field. Mr. Barkalow. 

ZO 561. Animal Embryology 0-4 

Prerequisite: BS 100 

The study of fundamental principles which apply in the achievement of 

complex animal structure. Mr. Alliston. 



200 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ZO 581. Parasitology I 4-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 223 

The study of the morphology, biology, and control of the parasitic protozoa 

and helminths of man, domestic and wild animals. Mr. Harkema. 

ZO 582. (ENT 582) Medical and Veterinary Entomology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 

A study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic arthropods 

of man, domestic and wild animals. Messrs. Farrier, Harkema. 

ZO 590. Special Studies Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor 

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in Zoology, 
accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three 
credits allowed toward the bachelor's degree, six toward the master's degree 
and nine toward the doctorate. Staff. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

ZO 603. Advanced Parasitology 0-3 

Prerequisite: ZO 581 

The study of the theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, 

physiology, and immunology of animal parasites. Mr. Harkema. 

ZO 604. (ANS 604) Experimental Animal Physiology 4-0 

Prerequisite: ZO 513 or Equivalent 

A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in 

physiological investigation. Messrs. Ulberg, Wise. 

ZO 614. Cell Physiology 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 301 and Approval of Instructor 

A study of those fundamental physiological properties at the cellular level 
which are common to nearly all organisms. Lectures, discussions, and critical 
reports (oral and written) to promote acquaintance with general literature 
and recent advances. Mr. Santolucito. 

ZO 627. Zoogeography 3-0 

Prerequisites: ZO 522 and Approval of Instructor 

The geographic distribution of animals, with primary emphasis on land and 

fresh-water vertebrates. Mr. Quay. 

ZO 690. Seminar 1-1 

The presentation and defense of current literature papers dealing either 
with the findings of original research or with fundamental biological con- 
cepts. Staff. 

ZO 699. Research in Zoology Credits by Arrangement 

Prerequisites: Twelve Semester Credits in Zoology and Approval of Instructor 
Original research related to the student's thesis. A maximum of six credits 
is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the doctorate. 

Staff. 




Agricultural Engineering — Human energy requirements under simulated work-loads and environmental 
variables are given quantitative description. 



Chemical engineering and civil 
engineering graduate students and 
Faculty cooperate on highway re- 
search. Recording temperature 
measurements of test strips on a 
North Carolina highway is part 
of the bituminous highway project. 





Textiles — Graduate students test a fabric in the Gas Chromatograph, 
a device for analyzing volatile products arising from thermal decomposi- 
tion of high polymers. The Gas Chromatograph is just one of many re- 
search aids in laboratories of the Department of Textile Chemistry. 



Civil Engineering — An experimental study on an aluminum alloy connection of a 
geodesic dome under axial loads is conducted by a civil engineering professor investiga- 
ting the stability of connecting elements. 





Nuclear Engineering — This impos- 
ing concrete form shields State's 
nuclear reactor, housed in the Bur- 
lington Nuclear Laboratories, center 
for research on peacetime applica- 
tion of atomic energy. State was 
the first school in the United States 
to own a nuclear reactor. 




Library — Among State's research facilities is the D. H. Hill Library with holdings of 
ver 279,000 volumes. The library has a well-rounded collection for graduate study, 
ecent acquisitions reflect increasing campus interest in the liberal arts and strong 
■search programs in the fields of science and engineering. 





Design — Students work out a problem in structural design. The three depart- 
ments of the School of Design are located in Brooks Hall. 



Engineering Research — The ultra high temperature plasma crystal growing facili 
is an integral part of the materials research program. 





Agricultural Research — Vital to the multi-million dollar agricultural research activi- 
ties are the extensive greenhouse facilities for crop and horticulture sciences. 



Animal Science — Spacious, well- 
equipped laboratories offer grad- 
uate students excellent opportunity 
for research and study. Students of 
animal science frequently use 
diagnostic laboratories in their 
course of study. 





Applied Mathematics — Researchers in applied mathematics employ the intricate 
machinery of the Goodyear Electronic Differential Analyzer in their work. 




Wood Technology — Research in forestry and wood products is leading to the develop- 
ment of new processes, techniques, and uses for woods. A veneer cutting investigation 
is made by these students in wood technology. 



Food Science — The research staff 
is constantly seeking ways of im- 
proving the important dairying in- 
dustry. Modern facilities, such as 
this steam-vacuum equipment, is 
aiding in research to meet the chal- 
lenge of new products. 




Engineering — Research problems frequently call for specialized equipment. Here 
graduate students in engineering carry out their research with the aid of the Van de 
Graaff control and instrumentation panel. 





Computing Center — The IBM 1410 Tape System provides the computing facility for 
faculty and students in research and instruction. Two IBM 1620's and a LINC III 
furnish additional computing capabilities for some departments. 




Civil Engineering — Students in a physical testing laboratory conduct stress analysis 
study on an aluminum beam. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 209 

* GRADUATE FACULTY 

AT 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

AT RALEIGH 

Sidney Addelman, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Charles Walter Alliston, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Raul E. Alvarez, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Michael Amein, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Clifton A. Anderson, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Donald Benton Anderson, Professor of Botany and Vice President of Aca- 
demic Affairs of The University of North Carolina. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Richard Loree Anderson, Professor of Experimental Statistics and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Roy Nels Anderson, Professor of Education and Head of Department of 

Occupational Information and Guidance. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
•Jay Lawrence Apple, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Arthur A. Armstrong, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Frank B. Armstrong, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Botany and Bac- 
teriology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Clarence Monroe Asbill, Jr., Professor of Textile Machine Design and De- 
velopment and Head of Department. 

B.S., Clemson College. 
Leonard William Aurand, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
William Wyatt Austin, Jr., Professor of Metallurgical Engineering and Head 

of Department of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Richard Charles Axtell, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Aycock, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Thomas Sanderson Baldwin, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Ernest A. Ball, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 



* Membership in the graduate faculty may be in either of two categories: (1) full status or 
(2) associate status. Full status permits a faculty member to engage in any and all phases 
of the graduate programs of the University. Associate members may teach courses at the 
graduate level and serve as chairman of master's advisory committees. 

* On leave until November, 1965 



210 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Walter Elmer Ballinger, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
Clifford Warren Barber, Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D. Cornell University. 
William John Barclay, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Aldos Cortez Barefoot, Jr., Associate Professor of Wood Products. 

Doctor of Forestry, Duke University. 
Frederick Schenck Barkalow, Jr., Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Key Lee Barkley, Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Elliott Roy Rarrick, Professor of Animal Science and Head of Animal Dairy 

and Husbandry Section. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
William Victor Bartholomew, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Edward Guy Batte, Professor of Animal Science and Head of Veterinary 

Section. 

D.V.M., Texas A 8c M. 
Ernest Oscar Beal, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
Homer Edwin Beam, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Ed.D., University of North Carolina. 
Kenneth Orion Beatty, Jr., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Burton Floyd Beers, Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Norman Robert Bell, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

M.S., Cornell University. 
Thomas A. Bell, Associate Professor of Food Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
William Callum Bell, Professor of Ceramic Engineering in Engineering 

Research. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Willard Harrison Bennett, Burlington Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Eugene Edwin Bernard, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of Leeds. 
Ernest Bezold Berry, Assistant Professor of Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 
Bibhuti Bhushan Bhattacharyya, Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., London School of Economics. 
Richard Hugh Bigelow, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Ilham Ahmet Birkan, Research Instructor of Textiles. 

Ph.D., Technical University of Istanbul. 
John William Bishir, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Charles Edwin Bishop, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Agricultural Economics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
William Joseph Block, Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 211 

William Lowry Blow, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Thomas Nelson Blumer, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
John Francis Bogdan, Professor of Textiles and Director of Processing 

Research. 

B.T.E., Lowell Textile Institute. 
Edgar John Boone, Professor of Rural Sociology and Assistant Director of 

Extension. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Carey H. Bostian, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Henry Dittimus Bowen, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Charles Raymond Bramer, Professor of Civil Engineering and Acting Head 

of Department. 

E. M., Michigan College of Mining and Technology. 
Bartholomew Brandner Brandt, Professor Emeritus of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Charles H. Brett, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Kansas State College. 
Richard Bright, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., State University of Iowa. 
Charles A. Brim, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 
Henry Seawell Brown, Associate Professor of Geological Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Marvin L. Brown, Jr., Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Wesley Gordon Bruce, Visiting Professor of Entomology. 

M.S., Kansas State College. 
Roberts Cozart Bullock, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Carl Lee Bumgardner, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Fred Virgil Cahill, Jr., Professor of History and Political Science and Dean 

of the School of General Studies. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
John Tyler Caldwell, Professor of Political Science and Chancellor. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

B.S., Bates College. 
Malcolm Eugene Campbell, Professor of Textiles and Dean of the School of 

Textiles. 

B.S., Clemson College. 
William V. Campbell, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Thomas Franklin Cannon, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
George L. Capel, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 



212 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering and Director 

of Instruction for School of Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Roy Merwin Carter, Professor of Wood Technology. 

M.S., Michigan State College. 
Edward Vitangelo Caruolo, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
David Marshall Cates, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
John Wesley Cell, Professor of Mathematics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Douglas Scales Chamblee, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D. Iowa State College. 
Norman M. Chansky, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and 

Psychology. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
John Montgomery Clarkson, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Albert J. Clawson, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Carlyle Newton Clayton, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Grover Cleveland Cobb, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Fred Derward Cochran, Professor of Horticulture and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Columbus Clark Cockerham, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Eloise Snowden Cofer, Assistant Director, Agricultural Extension (Home 

Economics) . 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Norval White Conner, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of 

Department of Engineering Research. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 
William Stokes Connor, Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
Freeman Waldo Cook, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
John Oliver Cook, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., New York University. 
Maurice Gayle Cook, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Arthur W. Cooper, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
William Earl Cooper, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Alonzo Freeman Coots, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Will Allen Cope, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Harold Maxwell Corter, Professor of Psychology and Director of Psychological 

Clinic. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
Arthur James Coutu, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 213 

Frederick Russell Cox, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Gertrude Mary Cox, Professor Emeritus of Experimental Statistics. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 
Frank Rankin Craig. Professor of Poultry Science. 

D.V.M., University of Georgia. 
Paul Day Cribbins, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
George A. Cummings, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Edmund Pendleton Dandridge, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Walter Carl Dauterman, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Donald Gould Davenport, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

M.S., Cornell University. 
Charles Bingham Davey, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin. 
Henry Mauzee Davis, Adjunct Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
William Robert Davis, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Doktor der Naturwiss, University of Hanover, Germany. 
James William Dickens, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Emmett Urcey Dillard, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
George Osmore Doak, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Walter J. Dobrogosz, Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Wesley Osborne Doggett, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
William Emmert Donaldson, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Jesse Seymour Doolittle, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Graduate 

Administrator. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State College. 
Robert Alden Douglas, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Louis A. Dow, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Lawrence William Drabick, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and 

Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Donald W. Drewes, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
John Wesley Dudley, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
John W. Duffield, Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Arthur Raymond Eckels, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

D. Eng., Yale University. 
Preston William Edsall, Professor of History and Political Science and Head 

of Department. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 



214 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

John Auert Edwards, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
William Frederick Edwards, Associate Professor of Social Studies. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Gerald H. Elkan, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Don Edwin Ellis, Professor of Plant Pathology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Eric Louis Ellwood, Professor of Wood Science and Technology and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Munir R. El-Saden, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
John Frederick Ely, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering and Engineering 

Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Donald Allen Emery, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
John Lincoln Etchells, Professor of Food Science and Botany and Bacteri- 
ology. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
James Brainerd Evans, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Ralph Eigil Fadum, Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the School 

of Engineering. 

S.D., Harvard University. 
Maurice H. Farrier, Associate Professor of Entomology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
James K. Ferrell, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Alva Leroy Finkner, Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Charles Page Fisher, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
James Walter Fitts, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Leon David Freedman, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Daniel Fromm, Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Alan Stuart Galbraith, Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Gene John Galletta, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Gerald Garb, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Bertram Howard Garcia, Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
Monroe Evans Gardner, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Henry Wilburn Garren, Professor of Poultry Science and Head of Depart- 
ment. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 215 

Joachim Gaylor, Research Instructor of Textiles. 

Ph.D., Technische Hochschule. 
Dan Ulrich Gerstel, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Forrest William Getzen, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
William Best Gilbert, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Edward Walker Glazener, Professor of Poultry Science and Director of In- 
struction for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
William Alexander Glenn, Adjunct Associate Professor of Industrial Engi- 
neering and Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Lemuel Goode, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

M.S., University of West Virginia. 
Guy Vernon Gooding, Assistant Adjunct Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Bruce Edward Goodwin, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 
Gilbert Gottlieb, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Arnold H. E. Grandage, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Ralph Weller Greenlaw, Associate Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Walton Carlyle Gregory, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
John Edward Griffith, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics and 

Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Harry Douglas Gross, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Elliott Brown Grover, Abel C. Lineberger Professor of Textiles and Head 

of Department of Textile Technology. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
George Albert Gullette, Professor of Social Studies and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Edward DeWitt Gurley, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Frank Edwin Guthrie, Professor of Entomology and Assistant Dean of the 

Graduate School for Research. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Frank Arlo Haasis, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
William Cullen Hackler, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Robert John Hader, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
William Jackson Hall, Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 



216 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Dame Scott Hamby, Burlington Industries Professor of Textiles. 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
Charles Horace Hamilton. William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D.. University of North Carolina. 
John Valentine Hamme, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Durwin M. Hanson, Professor of Industrial Education and Head of Depart- 
ment. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Karl P. Hanson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Michigan. 
Warren Dunvard Hanson, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
James W. Hardin, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Reinard Harkema, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Cleon Wallace Harrell, Associate Professor of Economics. 

M.A., University of Virginia. 
Walter Joel Harrington, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Clarence Arthur Hart, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Lodwick Charles Hartley, Professor of English and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Paul Henry Harvey, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Crop Science and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Hassan Ahmad Hassan, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Francis Jefferson Hassler, Professor of Agricultural Engineering and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
William Walter Hassler, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
Arthur Courtney Hayes, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Don W. Hayne, Visiting Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Frank Lloyd Haynes, Jr., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Teddy Theodore Hebert, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Walter A. Hendricks, Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

M.A., George Washington University. 
William Ray Henry, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Laurence Jay Herbst, Assistant Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Robert Taylor Herbst, Adjunct Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Francis Eugene Hester, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 217 

Charles Horace Hill, Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Thomas I. Hines, Professor of Recreation and Park Administration and Head 

of Department. 

M. A., University of North Carolina. 
George Burnham Hoadley, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Head of 

Department. 

D.Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Charles S. Hodges, Jr., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Ernest Hodgson, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Oregon State University. 
Abraham Holtzman, Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
William Calvin Hood, Assistant Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., Montana State University. 
Dale Max Hoover, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Maurice W. Hoover, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
John William Horn, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S.C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Daniel Goodman Horvitz, Adjunct Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Ivan Hostetler, Professor of Industrial Arts Education and Head of Depart- 
ment. 

Ed.D., University of Missouri. 
Barney Kuo-Yen Huang, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
George Hyatt, Jr., Professor of Animal Science and Director of Agricultural 

Extension Service. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Loren Albert Ihnen, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Makoto Itoh, Visiting Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Hiroshima University. 
William A. Jackson, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Gerald Blaine James, Adjunct Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Ed.D., University of Illinois. 
Herman Brooks James, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Dean of the 

School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Benjamin Anderson Jayne, Professor of Wood Science and Technology. 

B.S., University of Idaho. 
John Mitchell Jenkins, Jr., Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Harley Young Jennings, Professor of Textile Research. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Elmer Hubert Johnson, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Joseph Clyde Johnson, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ed.D., Peabody College. 
Paul R. Johnson, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



218 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

William Hugh Johnson, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Edgar Walton Jones, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Guy Langston Jones, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Ivan Dunlavy Jones, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Louis Allman Jones, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College. 
Kenneth Allan Jordan, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Charles Howard Kahn, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Joseph S. Kahn, Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Eugene J. Kamprath, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Morley Richard Kare, Professor of Poultry Science and Zoology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Abdel-Aziz Ismail Kashef, Visiting Lecturer of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Gerald Howard Katzin, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Kenneth Raymond Keller, Professor of Crop Science and Assistant Director 

in Charge of Tobacco Research. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Harry Charles Kelly, Professor of Physics and Dean of Faculty. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Joseph Wheeler Kelly, Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Arthur Kelman, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Plant 

Pathology and Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Henderson Grady Kincheloe, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Richard Adams King, M. G. Mann Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
James Bryant Kirkland, Professor of Agricultural Education and Dean of the 

School of Education. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
David M. Kline, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Glenn Charles Klingman, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Richard Bennett Knight, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Illinois. 
Toyoki Koga, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Tokyo University. 
Ken-ichi Kojima, Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Benjamin Granade Koonce, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 219 

John Clement Koop, Visiting Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
William Wurth Kriegel, Professor in Charge of Ceramic Engineering. 

Dr. Ing., Technische Hochschule, Hanover, Germany. 
Leaton John Kushman, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

M.S., George Washington University. 
Robert Walter Lade, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
John Ralph Lambert, Professor of Social Studies. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Joe Oscar Lammi, Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
♦Harold Augustus Lamonds, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Roy Axel Larson, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
James Giacomo Lecce, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
James Murray Leatherwood, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Thomas Benson Ledbetter, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Joshua Alexander Lee, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Richard Shao-Lin Lee, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
James Edward Legates, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Animal Science and Head of Animal Breeding Section. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Samuel George Lehman, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Washington University. 
Carlton James Leith, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Jack Levine, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
William Mason Lewis, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
David Allen Link, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert W. Llewellyn, Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

M.S., Purdue University. 
Richard Henry Loeppert, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
George Gilbert Long, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Roy Lee Lovvorn, Professor of Crop Science and Director of Research in the 

School of Agriculture. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Robert E. Lubow, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Poultry Science, and 

Zoology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 

* On leave until July, 1964 



220 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

George Blanchard Lucas, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Henry Laurence Lucas, Jr., William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor 

of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
James Fulton Lutz, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Joseph Thomas Lynn, Associate Professor of Physics and Graduate Admini- 
strator. 

M.S., Ohio State University. 
•Glenn C. McCann, Associate Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Ph.D., Washington State College. 
Charles B. McCants, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Robert E. McCollum, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Clarence Leslie McCombs, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Ralph Joseph McCracken, Professor of Soil Science and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Charles Russell McCullough, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., Purdue University. 
Donald McDonald, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., University of Illinois. 
Patrick Hill McDonald, Professor of Engineering Mechanics and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
John Joseph McNeill, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Francis Edward McVay, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
James Gray Maddox, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Alexander Russell Main, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cambridge University. 
T. Ewald Maki, Carl Alwin Schenck Professor of Forest Management. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Carroll Lamb Mann, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

C.E., Princeton University. 
Thurston Jefferson Mann, Professor of Genetics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Edward George Manning, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Edward Raymond Manring, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State. 
Culpepper Paul Marsh, Associate Professor of Rural Sociology. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
David Boyd Marsland, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
David Hamilton Martin, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
Bernard Stephen Martof, Professor of Zoology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

* On leave until July, 1965 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 221 

David Dickenson Mason, Professor of Experimental Statistics and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Gennard Matrone, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Dale Frederick Matzinger, Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Jackson R. M auney, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Selz Cabot Mayo, Professor of Rural Sociology and Head of Department; 

Head of Department of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Professor of Physics. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Professor of Physics and Dean of the School of 

Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Lawrence Eugene Mettler, Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Donald Milholland, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Conrad Henry Miller, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Darrell Alvin Miller, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Plant Breeding. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Grover Cleveland Miller, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Howard G. Miller, Professor of Psychology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Philip Arthur Miller, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State. 
Raymond Jarvis Miller, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Walter Joseph Mistric, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., A & M College of Texas. 
Adolphus Mitchell, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

M.S., University of North Carolina. 
Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor Emeritus of Entomology. 

D.S., Harvard University. 
Richard Douglas Mochrie, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Robert Harry Moll, Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Robert James Monroe, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Frank Harper Moore, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Robert Parker Moore, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Charles G. Morehead, Associate Professor of Occupational Information and 

Guidance. 

Ed.D., University of Kansas. 



222 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Donald Edwin Moreland, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Marvin Kent Moss, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Carey Gardner Mumford, Professor of Mathematics and Assistant to Dean 

of the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
W. Ray Murley, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Charles Franklin Murphy, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Raymond LeRoy Murray, Burlington Professor of Physics and Head of the 

Department of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
Richard Monier Myers, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
Howard Movess Nahikian, Professor of Mathematics and Graduate Admini- 
strator. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Gene Namkoong, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Richard Robert Nelson, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Joseph T. Nerden, Professor of Industrial Education. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Herbert H. Neunzig, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Slater Edmund Newman, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Lowell Wendell Nielsen, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Stuart Noblin, Professor of History and Political Science. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Glenn Ray Noggle, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology and Head of De- 
partment. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Charles Joseph Nusbaum, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Bernard Martin Olsen, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Guy Owen, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Mehmet Nicolti Ozisik, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of London. 
Hayne Palmour, III, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Hubert Vern Park, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Jae Young Park, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
John Mason Parker, III, Professor in Charge of Geological Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Ernest Caleb Pasour, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 223 

Richard Roland Patty, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State. 
Ralph James Peeler, Jr., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D. North Carolina State. 
Jerome J. Perry, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D. University of Texas. 
Thomas Oliver Perry, Associate Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Roger Gene Petersen, Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Walter John Peterson, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Chemistry and Dean of the Graduate School. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
Wilbur Carroll Peterson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Lyle L. Phillips, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Walter Henry Pierce, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Richard Coleman Pinkerton, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert McLean Pinkerton, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

B.Sc, Bradley University. 
George Waverly Poland, Professor of Modern Languages and Head of De- 
partment. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Daniel Townsend Pope, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Joseph Alexander Porter, Jr., Professor of Textiles. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Ira D. Porterfield, Professor of Animal Science and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Nathaniel T. Powell, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Richard Joseph Preston, Professor of Forestry and Dean of the School of 

Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Charles Harry Proctor, Associate Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Charles Ray Pugh, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Thomas Lavalle Quay, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
John William Querry, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 
Robert Lamar Rabb, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Allen Huff Rakes, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Sridhar M. Ramachandra, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Harold Arch Ramsey, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 



224 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

John Oren Rawlings, Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Horace Darr Rawls, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Preston Harding Reid, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Willis Alton Reid, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Theodore R. Rice, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Harvard. 
Frances M. Richardson, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., University of Cincinnati. 
Jackson Ashcraft Rigney, Professor of Experimental Statistics and Director 

of Agricultural Mission to Peru. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 
William Milner Roberts, Professor of Food Science and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Cowin Cook Robinson, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Harold Frank Robinson, Professor of Genetics, Director of Institute of 

Biological Sciences, and Assistant Director of Research, Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 

Ph.D., Nebraska University. 
Odis Wayne Robison, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
John Paul Ross, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Paul James Rust, Associate Professor of Psychology and English. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Henry Ames Rutherford, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Head of 

Department. 

M.S., George Washington University. 
Hans Sagan, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 
John Anthony Santolucito, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Joseph Neal Sasser, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Leroy C. Saylor, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Clarence Cayce Scarborough, Professor of Agricultural Education and Head 

of Department. 

Ed.D., University of Illinois. 
Edward Martin Schoenborn, Jr., Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head 

of Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Joachim-Dietrich Schobel, Associate Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Doktor— Eng., Tech. Hochschule. 
George John Schumacher, Visiting Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
* Herbert Temple Scofield, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 



* On leave until September, 1965 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 225 

James Arthur Seagraves, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
John Frank Seely, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Heinz Seltmann, Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Luther Shaw, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Ching Sheng Shen, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Francis Webber Sherwood, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert T. Sherwood, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
William Edward Shinn, Chester H. Roth Professor of Knitting and Head of 

Knitting Department, School of Textiles. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Darrell Rhea Shreve, Professor of Mathematics and Director of Computing 

Laboratory. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Richard Lee Simmons, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Edward Carroll Sisler, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Charles Smallwood, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering and Graduate Admini- 
strator. 

M.S., Harvard University. 
William Wesley Garry Smart, Jr., Associate Professor of Animal Science and 

Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Frederick Otto Smetana, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Southern California. 
Benjamin Warfield Smith, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Professor of Entomology and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Frank Houston Smith, Professor of Animal Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Rufus Hummer Snyder, Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
James Maurice Spain, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Marvin Luther Speck, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Food Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Herbert Elvin Speece, Professor of Mathematics and Education. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
William Eldon Splinter, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Edward M. Stack, Professor of Modern Languages. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Ralph Winston Stacy, Professor of Biomathematics, Experimental Statistics, 

and Zoology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 



226 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Hans Heinrich Anton Stadelmaier, Professor of Mineral Industries. 

Dr. rer. nat., Technische, Hochschule, Stuttgart, Germany. 
Edward Paul Stahel, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Alfred J. Stamm, Professor of Wood Technology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Robert George Douglas Steel, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Stanley George Stephens, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Genetics. 

Ph.D., Edinburgh University, Scotland. 
William Damon Stevenson, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering and 

Graduate Administrator. 

M.S., University of Michigan. 
Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Professor of Animal Science and Assistant Director 

of Research in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Robert Franklin Stoops, Research Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
David Lewis Strider, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Raimond Aldrich Struble, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 
William Clifton Stuckey, Jr., Associate Professor of Textiles. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Jack Suberman, Professor of English and Director of Summer Sessions. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Charles Wilson Suggs, Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Joseph Gwyn Sutherland, U.S.D.A. Agricultural Economist. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Paul Porter Sutton, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Ralph Clay Swann, Professor of Chemistry and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Ernst W. Swanson, Professor of Economics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Fred Russell Tarver, Jr., Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Donald Loraine Thompson, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
David Harry Timothy, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Tsuan Wu Ting, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
George Stanford Tolley, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Huseyin Cavit Topakoglu, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.Sc, Technological Institute of Istanbul. 
William Douglas Toussaint, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Samuel B. Tove, Professor of Animal Science and Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 227 

Horace Maynard Trent, Adjunct Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Anastasios Christos Triantaphyllou, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Hedwig Hirschmann Triantaphyllou, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Erlangen, Germany. 
James Richard Troyer, Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Robert Wesley Truitt, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Head of 

Department. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
William Preston Tucker, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Lester Curtis Ulberg, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Robert Phillip Upchurch, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Mehmet Ensar Uyanik, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Jan van Schilfgaarde, Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Hubertus Robert van der Vaart, Professor of Experimental Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of Leiden, Netherlands. 
Richard J. Volk, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Harvey Edward Wahls, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Monroe Eliot Wall, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Thomas Dudley Wallace, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and 

Experimental Statistics. 

M.S., Oklahoma State University. 
Richard Gaither Walser, Professor of English. 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Arthur W. Waltner, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Daniel Shou-ling Wang, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Frederick Gail Warren, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
David S. Weaver, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Jerome Bernard Weber, Assistant Professor of Cop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Sterling Barg Weed, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State. 
Frederick Lovejoy Wellman, Visiting Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Bertram W. Wells, Professor Emeritus of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Oscar Wesler, Professor of Experimental Statistics and Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Crop Science and Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



228 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Raymond Cyrus White, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., West Virginia University. 
David C. Whitenberg, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., A & M College of Texas. 
John Kerr Whitfield, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

M. S., North Carolina State. 
Larry Alston Whitford, Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Rudolph Willard, Visiting Professor in Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Cliff R. Willey, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Dudley Williams, Professor of Physics and Head of Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
James Clifford Williams, III, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Southern California. 
Porter Williams, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

M.A., Cambridge University; University of Virginia. 
James Claude Williamson, Jr., Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

M.S., North Carolina State. 
Ralph E. Williamson, Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology and 

Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Nash Nicks Winstead, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Sanford Richard Winston, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Lowell Sheridan Winton, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
George Herman Wise, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of 

Animal Science and Head of Animal Nutrition Section. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Milton Garland Woltz, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
James Woodburn, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Dr. Engr., Johns Hopkins University. 
William Walton Woodhouse, Jr., Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
James T. Yen, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
David Allan Young, Jr., Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Kansas. 
James N. Young, Associate Professor of Rural Sociology and Assistant Direc- 
tor of Instruction in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 
Talmage Brian Young, Associate Professor of Industrial Arts Education. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Paul Z. T. Zia, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Bruce J. Zobel, Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Carl Frank Zorowski, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 



INDEX 



Administration, Officers of 5, 6 

Administrative Board: 

University of North Carolina, Raleigh, 

members 5 

University of North Carolina, Chapel 

Hill, members 6 

University of North Carolina, 

Greensboro, members 6 

Admission: 

full graduate standing 

provisional admission 18 

unclassified graduate students 

public school personnel 

graduate-special 

Advisory Committee 23, 30 

Agricultural Economics 40 

Agricultural Education 44, 82 

Agricultural Engineering 44 

Agriculture 47 

Animal Science 48 

Anthropology 1 84 

Assistantships 38 

Bacteriology 51 

Biological Sciences 50 

Biological Sciences, Institute of 17 

Botany 51 

Calendar 7 

Ceramic Engineering 155, 157 

Chemical Engineering 55 

Chemistry 60 

Civil Engineering 65 

Computing Facilities 16 

Course of Study 23, 30 

Course Load 20, 23, 30 

Course Numbers 40 

Crop Science 72 

Degrees 20-35 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 29-35 

admission to candidacy 34 

course of study 30 

dissertation 32 

examinations 32 

languages 31 

residence 30 

summary of procedures 34 

Economics 75 

Education 80 

Electrical Engineering 94 

Engineering Mechanics 100 

Engineering Research, Department of .. 13 
English: 

examination in 25, 31 

requirements for foreign students ..25, 31 

Entomology 1 05 

Examinations: 

Master's 25 

Ph.D 32 

physical 19 

Examining Committee 26, 32 

Executive Council 5 

Experimental Statistics 108 

Fees 35-37 

Fellowships 38 

Fields of Instruction 40 

Food Science 119 

Foreign Language 24, 26, 31 

Forestry 122 

Genetics 1 28 

Geological Engineering 156, 160 

Grades 24 

Graduate Assistantships 38 

Graduate Credit: 

for correspondence courses 23 

for extension courses 23 

for faculty members 20 

for seniors 20 



Graduate Degrees 20-35 

Graduate Faculty: 

conditions of membership in 209 

members of 209 

(See list under each department) 

Graduate Record Examinations 18 

Graduate School, organization of 13 

History 131 

Horticultural Science 134 

Industrial Arts 83 

Industrial Education 85 

Industrial Engineering 137 

In-State Students, definition of 37 

Institute of Biological Sciences 17 

Institute of Statistics 15 

Language Requirements: 

for Master of Science 24 

for Master's Degree in a Professional 

Field 26 

for Doctor of Philosophy 31 

Library 14 

Map, Campus ."I 

Master's Degree, Summary of procedures 27 

Master of Agriculture 27 

Master of Science Degree 21-26 

class work 24 

courses of study 23 

credits 23 

examinations 25 

grades 24 

language requirements 24 

summary of procedures 27 

residence 24 

thesis 25 

Master's Degree in a Professional 

Field 26-27 

language requirements 26 

other requirements 27 

thesis requirements 26 

Mathematics 1 40 

Mechanical Engineering 146 

Metallurgical Engineering 156, 163 

Mineral Industries 155 

Modern Languages 165 

National Teachers Examination 18, 27 

North Carolina Agricultural 

Experiment Station 13 

North Carolina State, history of 11 

Nuclear Engineering 166 

Nuclear Reactor Project 16 

Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies 16 
Occupational Information and 

Guidance 87 

Out-of-State Students, definition of .... 37 

Philosophy 1 69 

Physical Examinations 19 

Physics ]69 

Plant Pathology 175 

Political Science J31 

Poultry Science 178 

Procedures: 

for Master's degree 27 

for Doctor of Philosophy degree 34 

Psychology 89 

Registration 19 

Religion 169 

Residence Facilities 39 

Rural Sociology 179 

Sociology ]«4 

Soil Science 187 

Statistics, Experimental 108 

Statistics, Institute of 15 

Textiles 190 

Thesis 25 

Tuition and Fees 35-37 

Zoology 197 



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